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Old 03-25-2020, 06:32 PM   #1
1948F-1Pickup
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Default Flathead V8 radiator

Two upper hose brass connections, sweated onto the brass upper tank.
One of them looks like the photo. Weep/seep..... whatever you want to call it.

I'm having to top the radiator off after every drive. (Whether the water level is above or below the fitting, same result) I'm assuming the water level needs to be at or slightly above the top of the core.
My gut reaction is I should try to re-solder the problem fitting.
Water temp may get to a blistering 165-degrees at the maximum.
No water in the oil pan, no water out the exhaust and none on the ground. Water is going somewhere.

Could I be losing 1 quart of water out the leaking seam at the connector? It isn't visibly "wet." You can see the evidence though.

Anyone ever solder something like this radiator fitting? (acid core solder)
Historically, my past results haven't been too impressive.
I may try it anyway as I loath taking the radiator out of this vehicle and then having to re-establish the water level after you reinstall..... which seems to take about 2 months.
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Old 03-25-2020, 06:40 PM   #2
RKS.PA
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Default Re: Flathead V8 radiator

Have you considered an epoxy sealer alternative to soldering? Is that even practical? Not a lot of pressure....4lbs?
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Old 03-25-2020, 06:47 PM   #3
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Default Re: Flathead V8 radiator

Maybe take out the radiator go to a shop and have it serviced anyway that way it will be soldered up again . After that arrange with them to come back and have it pressure tested and see if you have a leak elsewhere. Of course mind how much pressure they put in . And if I where you Id put in 180 thermostats.
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Old 03-25-2020, 11:17 PM   #4
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Default Re: Flathead V8 radiator

Don't even think about some high school kid fix. Nothing short of a professional job done at a real radiator shop will do.
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Old 03-25-2020, 11:41 PM   #5
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Default Re: Flathead V8 radiator

F-1 - Rick does outstanding work and he is over in Azusa.
http://www.classicautoradiator.com/
Ricks Radiator
693 E Arrow Hwy, Azusa, CA 91702
Phone: (626) 967-7518
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Old 03-26-2020, 01:55 AM   #6
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Default Re: Flathead V8 radiator

If itīs only the soldering that has gone bad that should be an easy fix...for a radiator shop...canīt imagine they would charge you for more then an hour...
If itīs a crack due to fatigue in the metal then itīs a different story..
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Old 03-26-2020, 03:18 AM   #7
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Default Re: Flathead V8 radiator

It looks like a fatigue crack heading up towards the centre of the tank.

I just soldered a repair on my 33 tank where it had cracked. I used a section of copper pipe and split it out to make a small sheet. I soldered it over the crack and made what I would consider to be a good repair.

If you want to try soldering it, don't try and do it with the rad in place. Take it off and clean it meticulously. A wire wheel in a drill works good. Abrasive paper and wire wool is good too.

Lay the rad down so the area to be soldered is horizontal. Cut your patches. Clean everything to bright metal.
Put solder on the radiator and then put the patch over and heat it until the solder melts and the two fuse together. Then carefully apply solder around the edge to make sure.

Use lots of flux before and during the job.

I did take some video of my repair but it will not be ready to put on youtube for a while yet.

I took my rad from having multiple leaks to holding water nicely.

If your repair does not work, two minutes at a radiator shop will have your failed repair melted off there and they can have a go. In other words you won't screw it up for them by having a go first.

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Old 03-26-2020, 03:21 AM   #8
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Default Re: Flathead V8 radiator

the trick will be getting rid of the crud that has accumulated in the seam by crud i mean coolant and calcium etc with out doing that your wasting your time . Find a good rad shop and let them work their magic it pays in the long run. By the look of that photo that neck isnt far from total failure and you can bet it wont happen in your driveway
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Old 03-26-2020, 04:26 AM   #9
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Default Re: Flathead V8 radiator

If you are going to solder it...rivets has to come out to be able clean both sides.
Stainless wirebrush !! any leftovers from sandpapers or other abrasive will work against you.
Solder water(flux) in bottle and a brush.
Low temp solder made for radiators...if you try using hightemp for plumbing there is a fair chance you melt another place and create more leaks.
Rose bud tip in an Oxy/Acethylene torch.
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Old 03-26-2020, 11:37 PM   #10
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Default Re: Flathead V8 radiator

Rose Bud tip!
That’s about like using a bon fire to cook a marshmallow!
A bit too much heat for a radiator. A smaller brazing tip will work just fine.
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Old 03-27-2020, 12:20 AM   #11
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Default Re: Flathead V8 radiator

Quote:
Originally Posted by RalphM View Post
Rose Bud tip!
That’s about like using a bon fire to cook a marshmallow!
A bit too much heat for a radiator. A smaller brazing tip will work just fine.
Multiple flame tip then...my translation was perhaps a bit off
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Old 03-27-2020, 02:35 AM   #12
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Default Re: Flathead V8 radiator

I used to use a oxy acetylene flame but very gentle. I recently used a very simple el cheapo blowtorch. Nothing fancy.

My technique is to be ready to flick the flame away the moment I feel it is getting too hot. Flick it away.. Bring it back..Flick it away.. etc.

Like most things I am self taught so I may be doing it different to others. Maybe completely wrong, but I normally manage to make the repair.

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Old 03-27-2020, 03:50 PM   #13
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Default Re: Flathead V8 radiator

I chased the same issue. I think the aging tanks fatigue cuz the engine vibration is transmitted thru the hose & pipe.
I had work done at a shop and he found and soldered up the fatigued areas as well as rodding.
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Old 03-27-2020, 04:24 PM   #14
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Default Re: Flathead V8 radiator

Quote:
Originally Posted by CA Victoria View Post
I chased the same issue. I think the aging tanks fatigue cuz the engine vibration is transmitted thru the hose & pipe.
I'm thinking this is spot on.
I'll probably end up taking it out and on down to Rick's Radiator.
Not looking forward to either part of the R&R.
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Old 03-27-2020, 04:46 PM   #15
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Default Re: Flathead V8 radiator

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1948F-1Pickup View Post
I'm thinking this is spot on.
I'll probably end up taking it out and on down to Rick's Radiator.
Not looking forward to either part of the R&R.
I'd be more worried about the "paying for it" part in this day and age.
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Old 03-27-2020, 07:10 PM   #16
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Default Re: Flathead V8 radiator

Maybe try the really cheap fix, before going to all that trouble. May be possible to do with the radiator in the car.

My radiator was showing some light calcium deposits around the joints of top hose connectors to top tank, and tank to core edge. Wire brushed the heck out of the whole top tank, brushed on a thin layer of FlexSeal ("As Seen on TV"}. Let the FlexSeal set up for two days and then painted the top tank black. After about a year and 2,000 miles with a 7 lb cap, no leaks or signs of failure of the FlexSeal.

Radiator FlexSeal small.jpg

Radiator Calcified small.jpg
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