Go Back   The Ford Barn > General Discussion > Model A (1928-31)

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-05-2013, 12:51 PM   #81
Rock Hornbuckle
Senior Member
 
Rock Hornbuckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Bonney Lake, Washington
Posts: 532
Default Re: Farmer fixes

Quote:
Originally Posted by columbiA View Post
A couple months ago,I did a *farmer fix* of sorts.I was driving along a country road when the engine died.The drain plug had fallen out of the carb& the gas was running out.I was beside an orchard so I looked around & found a small branch & shoved a piece of it in the hole & was able to drive home & get a plug from a spare carb.One of the great things about these cars is that it doesnt take much to keep them running.
I was driving 'ol' 29 Nellie home from a parade when the flange on the tail pipe broke off and the entire exhaust system hit the pavement. I had a roll of tie-wire used for tying rebar in the trunk. I was able to tie things up and drive her home. I had learned alot during my penniless teenage years about keeping my old Ford Coupe wired together.
__________________
'29 Standard coupe 45-A / whitewalls
'31 Fordor Deluxe 2W Briggs 170-B / blackwalls
'41 Fordor Deluxe / 2-duece flattie
'55 Ford F-100 / 302
'66 1/2 Dodge Charger
'12 SRT8 Challenger Yellow Jacket Limited Edition.

Semper Fidelis
Rock Hornbuckle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 05:57 PM   #82
oldmanandakid
Senior Member
 
oldmanandakid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Southern Nevada
Posts: 149
Default Re: Farmer fixes

Quote:
Originally Posted by 40 Deluxe View Post
Regarding the comment about the expense of overhauling the Ferguson engine: I remember going with my dad to a Tractor Supply store in 1954 or '55 where he bought an overhaul kit for our TE-20 Ferguson. It had pistons, rings, sleeves, main and rod bearings, valves, valve guides and gaskets. Cost was $50!

It wasn't too long after that I was working as a cowboy at $40. a month plus board and room. Fifty bucks was a lot of cash then. I still cringe when I have to break a $50.
oldmanandakid is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Old 03-05-2013, 10:58 PM   #83
Shadetree
Senior Member
 
Shadetree's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Cottageville, WV
Posts: 1,535
Default Re: Farmer fixes

When I was a youngster my neighbor had a 1942 Chevy pickup. A rod started knocking so we straddled a ditch with the truck and pulled the oil pan. The engine had Babbitt bearings so we found the culprit that was knocking and removed the cap. With a file we took off enough metal from the cap for a good snug fit. While we had it apart we figured it would be worthwhile to do the other five rods. We put it all back together and the engine wouldn't turn over. We towed it and it would scoot the rear tires in 3rd gear. So we straddled the ditch again and removed the pan. We shimmed all of the rods with tin from an evaporated milk can.

It lasted a few days...
__________________
Son, you will never blow an engine up in high gear.
Shadetree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 11:39 PM   #84
Craig Lewis
Senior Member
 
Craig Lewis's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Parksville B.C. Canada
Posts: 880
Default Re: Farmer fixes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadetree View Post
When I was a youngster my neighbor had a 1942 Chevy pickup. A rod started knocking so we straddled a ditch with the truck and pulled the oil pan. The engine had Babbitt bearings so we found the culprit that was knocking and removed the cap. With a file we took off enough metal from the cap for a good snug fit. While we had it apart we figured it would be worthwhile to do the other five rods. We put it all back together and the engine wouldn't turn over. We towed it and it would scoot the rear tires in 3rd gear. So we straddled the ditch again and removed the pan. We shimmed all of the rods with tin from an evaporated milk can.

It lasted a few days...
Awesome story! I say we need more of this stuff
Craig Lewis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2013, 09:27 AM   #85
Farrell In Vancouver
Senior Member
 
Farrell In Vancouver's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Pitt Meadows BC
Posts: 1,003
Default Re: Farmer fixes

Dems the Brakes:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg P4280658.JPG (198.3 KB, 334 views)
File Type: jpg P4280660.JPG (150.1 KB, 249 views)
Farrell In Vancouver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2013, 09:35 PM   #86
Fred K-OR
Senior Member
 
Fred K-OR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Stayton, Oregon
Posts: 3,793
Default Re: Farmer fixes

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Another "farmer" type fix. This is what I found on my 29 std coupe. The angle iron was welded to the front of the already well welded front cross member. It then went under the front spring to hold the spring to the cross member. Had to cut it off with a torch to get the axle out.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg DSC00001a.jpg (33.6 KB, 276 views)
__________________
Fred Kroon
1929 Std Coupe
1929 Huckster
Fred K-OR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2013, 02:31 AM   #87
dumb person
Senior Member
 
dumb person's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: South pacific island
Posts: 1,724
Default Re: Farmer fixes


i was told this picture fits this threads theme.
__________________
<Link> This is how we roll<Link>

"I'm Convinced that no one really reads posts anymore; they just fabricate what they think the post says then ramble on about red herrings."--Bob
Outcasts rules of old cars
#1 Fun is imperative, mainstream is overrated
#2 If they think it is impossible, prove them wrong
#3 If the science says it impossible you are not being creative enough.
#4 No shame in recreating something you never had
#5 If it were not for the law & physics you would be unstoppable
dumb person is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 10:08 AM   #88
Rich in Tucson
Senior Member
 
Rich in Tucson's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Tucson, Arizona
Posts: 372
Default Re: Farmer fixes

How many can you spot?

I know at least one guy who resets his timing before every drive in his car but the guy who owned this one must have really been obsessed with it.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg MrKludgeDistributor_resized.jpg (54.3 KB, 504 views)
Rich in Tucson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2013, 03:12 PM   #89
Growley bear
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 777
Default Re: Farmer fixes

Brake drum field repair.

Last edited by Growley bear; 08-10-2014 at 09:07 AM.
Growley bear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2013, 03:23 PM   #90
Tom Endy
Senior Member
 
Tom Endy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Southern California
Posts: 2,673
Default Re: Farmer fixes

Farmer fixes

Tom Endy
Attached Images
File Type: jpg P1020466.jpg (71.1 KB, 315 views)
File Type: jpg P1020469.jpg (65.1 KB, 322 views)
File Type: jpg P1020471.jpg (59.7 KB, 336 views)
Tom Endy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2013, 04:40 PM   #91
400A-64
Senior Member
 
400A-64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Grass Valley,CA
Posts: 295
Default Re: Farmer fixes

This is not a farmer fix, but "Get the job done NOW".

On the World tour(1982) I broke an axle in Syria!! We had everything to do the job EXCEPT JACK STANDS !! WE gathered rocks, Set the wheels on them (Two high) to gain enough space to pull the rear end out. We laid out a blue tarp under the car so I would stay out of the dirt. I asked to guys to grab my ankles so the could pull me out if the car shifted too much!! I was jerked out from under three times !!! 6 hours later we finished up .This was done in the darkest of nights with flashlights!.
Bruce Davis
a400usa@nccn.net
400A-64 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2013, 09:16 AM   #92
Ted Duke
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Fairfield, Virginia
Posts: 561
Default Re: Farmer fixes

I don't have pictures, but when I was a kid way back in the forties and fifties my family had a friend who had a Model A pickup, 29 I think, and as the years went by and he dinged it around the farm (or once a tree fell on it) he made quite a few patches with expired Maryland license plates attached with nuts and bolts.

P. S. I tried to buy it several times until about 1985 when his wife told me she gave it to her nephew.

Ted
Ted Duke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2014, 10:08 PM   #93
TK in LA
Senior Member
 
TK in LA's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: La Verne, Ca.
Posts: 816
Default Re: Farmer fixes

The latest acquisition had an interesting breather pipe on it. It was made from a sink drain pipe that was plugged and a hose leads under the motor just far enough to remove the vapors.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg breather.jpg (50.6 KB, 225 views)
File Type: jpg breather2.jpg (23.4 KB, 211 views)
File Type: jpg Breather3.jpg (21.4 KB, 207 views)
File Type: jpg breather4.jpg (33.0 KB, 173 views)
TK in LA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2014, 10:16 PM   #94
SeaSlugs
Senior Member
 
SeaSlugs's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Central, IL
Posts: 3,920
Default Re: Farmer fixes


lets see, headlight switch is out of picture but over on passenger side, horn on dash, knife blade and key switch.


battery tray in engine compartment, check out the massively welded head.

All was done by my great grandpa whom Ive never met or my grandpa who will be missed dearly. Both were very creative with what they had. I didnt find many mechanical scary things, occasional nut and bolt instead of pin and cotter or most creative was a square nail, spring, washer and cotter pin as a emergency brake pin...took me a bit to figure out what everything was!
__________________
1929 Model AA - Need long splash aprons!
SeaSlugs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2014, 04:21 AM   #95
Tom Wesenberg
Senior Member
 
Tom Wesenberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Mpls, MN
Posts: 27,480
Default Re: Farmer fixes

Here's another farmer fix, and of all places it's a cobbled up fan. Two blades were cut off, then the cut area was welded to the hub.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Farmer Fix Fan.jpg (56.3 KB, 255 views)
Tom Wesenberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 09:13 PM   #96
jeep44
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: canton,michigan
Posts: 312
Default Re: Farmer fixes

reviving this thread-here's a "fix" I found on my recently-acquired 31 CCPU-it's a cable clamp, and a couple of bolts, making a sort of spring shackle. New shackles are sitting in the bed, waiting for me to tackle them.


jeep44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 10:14 PM   #97
califfarmer
Member
 
califfarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Newbury Park, CA
Posts: 41
Default Re: Farmer fixes

All these posts show just how "Out standing in our fields" us farmers. I'm going to have to remember some of these ideas. When your out working you make do with what is at hand.
Go Farmers!!!!!!!!!!!!
califfarmer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 09:37 AM   #98
Lona
Senior Member
 
Lona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Gloucester, Va
Posts: 459
Default Re: Farmer fixes

My parts car in 1956 was an A running roadster with no top or hood or trunk. It had two transmissions mounted in line which I would think was fairly common in the farm community to provide extra pulling power for their home made loggers.

Also had a friend traveling across country (not an A) and threw a rod through the side of the engine. He replaced the rod and used a flattened oil can and perma-tex to plug the hole and drove it home. Don't know if he screwed the tin to the block or not.

Glen
__________________
'31 Model A Deluxe Roadster
'31 Chrysler Model 70 Sedan
'88 Pontiac Fiero GT
'36 Auburn Boattail Speedster replica
Lona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 01:02 PM   #99
BILL WILLIAMSON
Senior Member
 
BILL WILLIAMSON's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: FRESNO, CA
Posts: 12,558
Default Re: Farmer fixes

Not really a farmer fix, but Chief described a PILE DRIVER, built by the W.P.A. It was a rear end, mounted on an "AA" flatbed, run by the P.T.O, brakes operated by hand levers, reels mounted to the drums & cables up to a tower, with a HEAVY driving weight.
In the '50's, I saw similar designed rigs, used to stack HAY, using LETHAL looking BIG PRONGED FORKS. It was AMAZING to see the operator in ACTION!!! He could throw hay bales atop a HUMONGEOUS TALL STACK! Wish I had pics.
Bill W.
__________________
"THE ASSISTANT GURU OF STUFF"
BILL WILLIAMSON is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 03:42 PM   #100
JAKEFORD
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Eastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 154
Default Re: Farmer fixes

Most of these are very ingenious and to me display the determination of the people involved. They never gave up.
JAKEFORD is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:10 AM.