Go Back   The Ford Barn > General Discussion > Model A (1928-31)

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-06-2018, 05:19 PM   #1
Great Lakes Greg
Senior Member
 
Great Lakes Greg's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,369
Default Radiator flow rate

Is there an accepted seconds measure for a radiator to drain it's contents? By this, I mean fill the radiator to the top while holding my hand over the bottom pipe. Remove my hand and count the seconds to a full drain.
Great Lakes Greg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2018, 07:38 PM   #2
father-son
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Kennesaw, GA
Posts: 24
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

there is a good Jack Bahm youtube video on this
father-son is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Old 07-06-2018, 09:01 PM   #3
redmodelt
Senior Member
 
redmodelt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 5,066
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

Just remember flow rate does not mean you have a good radiator. As radiators age, the fins loose contact with the tubes and you loose thermal transfer. In other words, you could have one that flows great but cools like poo.
__________________
I know the voices aren't real but damn they have some good ideas!
redmodelt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2018, 09:08 PM   #4
Synchro909
Senior Member
 
Synchro909's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 4,959
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

Quote:
Originally Posted by redmodelt View Post
Just remember flow rate does not mean you have a good radiator. As radiators age, the fins loose contact with the tubes and you loose thermal transfer. In other words, you could have one that flows great but cools like poo.
Ditto, ditto, ditto.
__________________
If schools stay closed too long, parents will find a vaccine before the scientists.
Synchro909 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2018, 09:33 PM   #5
Big hammer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Land of Lincoln
Posts: 1,958
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

When I had my radiator out of an engine change, I turned the radiator upside down and tried the flow test. What I found out is the rush of water flushed out about a shot glass of rust flakes! It emptied in about two seconds or less, the radiator may be 80 years old, but low mileage. For me it was a piece of mind wanted the best chance for the freshly rebuilt engine because a new engine needs help removing heat.
__________________
Don't force it with a little hammer tap, tap, tap
get a bigger hammer tap done
Big hammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2018, 10:18 PM   #6
daren007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Saint Cloud Mn
Posts: 572
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

You can pass the flow rate and still have partially clogged tubes.
daren007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2018, 03:04 AM   #7
Steve Plucker
Senior Member
 
Steve Plucker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Walla Walla, Washington USA
Posts: 5,819
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

HA...Greg, I have always wondered that myself!

My thought however would be to take a few known originals which are super clean, fill with water as you suggest, and measure the AMOUNT of water in each.

Then compare those findings with some that have been in use for a while of the same types and just see what the difference would be in the discharge to determine a "clogged" raidator.

Interesting question!

Pluck
__________________
www.plucks329s.org

Walla Walla (WA) Sweet A's since 1993

MARC/MAFCA member since 1978

Ford Model AA Truck Club since 1998

(LIONEL/MTH Toy Train Collector, Orange Crush Soda Collector, Steel Beer Can Collector, Old Gas Pump Collector)
Steve Plucker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2018, 05:55 AM   #8
Jacksonlll
Senior Member
 
Jacksonlll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Michigan-- Member of Oakleaf of MARC
Posts: 1,426
Send a message via ICQ to Jacksonlll
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

That filling the radiator and letting it drain is a very poor test of anything. If you question your flow rate, and you are running hot, then that old radiator is plugged. Most are and people try band aids until they buy a new one. Not worth the hassle. You asked about flow rate. It should flow about 36 GPM.
Jacksonlll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2018, 06:49 AM   #9
WHN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Connecticut Shoreline
Posts: 1,101
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

The syphon flow design of a Model A engine is 36 to 38 gpm.

This is needed to give you the 20 degree temperature difference between top of engine (outlet) and bottom of engine (inlet). Approximately 180 degrees top, 160 degrees bottom.

Most overheating problems that I have seen were fixed with a correct “new” radiator.

Paint, clogging, loose fins, leaking, anyone one or combination of all could be a problem.

A new radiator is just another item to check off on your “need to have” for a good runner list. Enjoy.
WHN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2018, 07:16 AM   #10
Kurt in NJ
Senior Member
 
Kurt in NJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: on the Littlefield
Posts: 5,157
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

the cross section area of the combined tubes it much larger than the hose nipples ---many can be clogged and still get all the flow that can go through the hose nipples
Kurt in NJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2018, 10:14 AM   #11
BILL WILLIAMSON
Senior Member
 
BILL WILLIAMSON's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: FRESNO, CA
Posts: 12,558
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

When Chief had a radiator out, for awhile, he kept it FACE down & FULL of water. Then backflushed it, before he installed it. "Sometimes" he filled it with a LYE solution, to clean it better.
Chiefs' Son--Bill W.
__________________
"THE ASSISTANT GURU OF STUFF"
BILL WILLIAMSON is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2018, 11:18 AM   #12
Ernie Vitucci
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Scottsdale, Arizona
Posts: 344
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

If an 'A' is over heating, then the radiator may be the problem. Also one needs to check timing and it is best to remove the head and vacuum and blow compressed air through the water jackets, paying particular attention to the area at the back of the block. I worked on one yesterday and the water jacket in the engine was pretty full of all sorts of bits of stuff. Once cleaned out, we pressure tested the block with 40 pounds of air and it was fine. A new 'BEST' head gasket with copper coat on both sides and then cleaned out the water jacket in the head the same way and put it back together. About 6 hours work...the old girl fired right up and seemed happy. Ernie in Arizona
Ernie Vitucci is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2018, 12:12 PM   #13
Railcarmover
BANNED
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 1,262
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

We have an industrial hot water pressure washer at the shop with quality chemical degreaser.Ive saved two radiators so far by flushing back and forth till the radiator gets good and hot.Water pump grease, debris and even some hard water deposits came out...at 500 bucks plus for a new one its worth a try..
Railcarmover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2018, 12:44 PM   #14
Great Lakes Greg
Senior Member
 
Great Lakes Greg's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,369
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

Thank you for all of the answers. The car in question does not run hot, but rather pushes out water at high speeds (50 plus). It really makes a mess on the hood and windshield. The overflow tube is not plugged. New gasket on the cap, but it sneaks past the Quail flip top. I wanted to check if the radiator was handling what the pump is throwing at it. We are going to try a 160 thermostat to slow the flow down.
Great Lakes Greg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2018, 01:38 PM   #15
WHN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Connecticut Shoreline
Posts: 1,101
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

Quote:
Originally Posted by Great Lakes Greg View Post
Thank you for all of the answers. The car in question does not run hot, but rather pushes out water at high speeds (50 plus). It really makes a mess on the hood and windshield. The overflow tube is not plugged. New gasket on the cap, but it sneaks past the Quail flip top. I wanted to check if the radiator was handling what the pump is throwing at it. We are going to try a 160 thermostat to slow the flow down.
Be careful with thermostats. Model As were not designed to work with one. Remember, the Model As cooling system is mainly syphon flow, the pump is really only of any help at higher speeds.

Are you missing the top plate inside the radiator? It sounds to me like its not there. Or is your radiator not allowing the flow of coolant to past down and out the bottom equal to the out flow from engine?

Look in your radiator, there should be a plate there so what you are explaining will not happen.
WHN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2018, 02:14 PM   #16
BILL WILLIAMSON
Senior Member
 
BILL WILLIAMSON's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: FRESNO, CA
Posts: 12,558
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

Stock caps eliminate messin' up yo' car.
Bill Clean
__________________
"THE ASSISTANT GURU OF STUFF"
BILL WILLIAMSON is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2018, 02:57 PM   #17
1crosscut
Senior Member
 
1crosscut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 1,382
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

Sounds like your main trouble is an ill fitting cap. I've seen some add an additional gasket made from a piece of inner tube to get a tighter fit. Keep working at getting a tight seal and the mess will go away.
Try running with a standard cap and allow the radiator to seek its comfortable water level. Too often a radiator is filled to the top and it will puke coolant out anyplace it can until if settles in at a level it is comfortable with. As long as the tubes in the radiator are covered you don't need to add any coolant.
__________________
Dave

It'll feel better when it quits hurting.
1crosscut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2018, 07:35 AM   #18
eagle
Senior Member
 
eagle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Eagle Bend, MN
Posts: 1,593
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

From experience with my A, it sounds like first thing is you need to get your cap TIGHT. I have a repro Quail and NO leaks. Second off, don't refill your radiator over the baffle. I add a quart to mine every spring, when I run it then it pukes some out the overflow and then is fine for the rest of the summer. Finds the level it wants and stays there. Not sure why I always add in the spring but I guess it gives me some peace of mind. Remember, the water pump SUCKS the water through the engine and radiator, it can't "pile it up" in the top tank.
__________________
"There are some that can destroy an anvil with a teaspoon and shouldn't be allowed to touch anything resembling a tool."
eagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2018, 09:29 AM   #19
BILL WILLIAMSON
Senior Member
 
BILL WILLIAMSON's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: FRESNO, CA
Posts: 12,558
Default Re: Radiator flow rate

REMEMBER, rust flakes stuck in the upper radumator tubes, is the most COMMON cause of OVERHEATING!!---Be SURE to backflush it, once or twice a year!!!
No matter how much we clean the block & head, this OOOLD CAST IRON is just like a "factory", that produces ONLY RUST FLAKES, on a continual basis.
Rusty Bill W.
__________________
"THE ASSISTANT GURU OF STUFF"
BILL WILLIAMSON is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:11 PM.