Go Back   The Ford Barn > General Discussion > Early V8 (1932-53)

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-11-2020, 05:05 PM   #1
jrvariel48
Senior Member
 
jrvariel48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 995
Default Rebuilt motor start up

I had my 8BA rebuilt and I'd like to test run it before it gets put in the car.
I would like to know EXACTLY what to do.

Here's some of the questions I have.

Do I need to install a radiator and coolant or can I run without it?
(I only plan on running it to check for oil pressure and leaks and whatever else I should be looking for)

I've read about priming the motor with oil, so I don't think that'll be a problem for me to handle.

Should I run an oil filter? I think it should, but want to input. It was plumbed for 95% oil filtering.

Should the clutch and pressure plate be installed?

Will it run it with a gravity feed fuel bottle or do I need a fuel pump? (Single two barrel carb)

Please let me know if I'm missing anything.

Thank you, Joe
jrvariel48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2020, 06:41 PM   #2
FortyNiner
Senior Member
 
FortyNiner's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: u-rah-rah-Wisconsin
Posts: 754
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

Perhaps I'm too simple minded - certainly possible - but by the time you mess around with all the bracing, plumbing, and electrical work to get an engine ready to test it could be in the car. That was my approach. Obviously, you get to decide. Hope the startup meets your expectations.
__________________
19 and 49 F1 - jes' like Henry II built
1946 Deluxe - as Henry built it
FortyNiner is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Old 01-11-2020, 07:28 PM   #3
Brian
Senior Member
 
Brian's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Masterton, New Zealand
Posts: 2,529
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

Should I run an oil filter? I think it should, but want to input. It was plumbed for 95% oil filtering.


If you run sans the filter, ensure the blocking grubscrew is removed from the oilway....
__________________
Unfortunately, two half wits don't make a whole wit!
Brian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2020, 07:39 PM   #4
Hal Beatty
Senior Member
 
Hal Beatty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Bellingham, WA
Posts: 104
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

New cam and lifters? If so, you'll need to run it at 2,000-2,500 rpm for 20 minutes to break them in... even though flatheads don't run the valve spring pressures that overheads do I'd want to do a good break-in on these parts.
Hal Beatty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2020, 07:49 PM   #5
Jim in Wisconsin
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 211
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

It'll run on gravity feed. You'll need a radiator for sure. I've run motors on stands - they get hot in just a few minutes.
It doesn't matter if the clutch is on it or not, as long as the flywheel in on. Make sure the flywheel bolts are tight!
Jim in Wisconsin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2020, 10:53 PM   #6
jrvariel48
Senior Member
 
jrvariel48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 995
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

Quote:
Originally Posted by FortyNiner View Post
Perhaps I'm too simple minded - certainly possible - but by the time you mess around with all the bracing, plumbing, and electrical work to get an engine ready to test it could be in the car. That was my approach. Obviously, you get to decide. Hope the startup meets your expectations.
It's really not too bad. I've dove a lot of motors this way, just not a fresh rebuild.
I also have to index the bellhousing for the T5 trans and I won't be able to do that in the car.
Thanks
jrvariel48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2020, 10:54 PM   #7
jrvariel48
Senior Member
 
jrvariel48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 995
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian View Post
Should I run an oil filter? I think it should, but want to input. It was plumbed for 95% oil filtering.


If you run sans the filter, ensure the blocking grubscrew is removed from the oilway....
Thank you Brian. I've read about some disasters here on the barn about that grub screw!
jrvariel48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2020, 10:55 PM   #8
jrvariel48
Senior Member
 
jrvariel48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 995
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hal Beatty View Post
New cam and lifters? If so, you'll need to run it at 2,000-2,500 rpm for 20 minutes to break them in... even though flatheads don't run the valve spring pressures that overheads do I'd want to do a good break-in on these parts.
Yessir, new cam and lifters. New everything!
Can this break in be done after the motor is pre-tested and back in the car?
Thanks
jrvariel48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2020, 10:56 PM   #9
jrvariel48
Senior Member
 
jrvariel48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 995
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim in Wisconsin View Post
It'll run on gravity feed. You'll need a radiator for sure. I've run motors on stands - they get hot in just a few minutes.
It doesn't matter if the clutch is on it or not, as long as the flywheel in on. Make sure the flywheel bolts are tight!
Thanks Jim, I can get that set-up in a jiffy!
Thank you
jrvariel48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2020, 02:20 PM   #10
Hal Beatty
Senior Member
 
Hal Beatty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Bellingham, WA
Posts: 104
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrvariel48 View Post
Yessir, new cam and lifters. New everything!
Can this break in be done after the motor is pre-tested and back in the car?
Thanks
Yeah... if you want to put the cam and lifters at risk.

Personally I wouldn't attempt to start that engine until you are ready to run it at high rpm for 20 min's or so as you are depending upon the oil thrown off of the crank and rods to adequately lubricate the cam lobes and lifters until they break in.
Hal Beatty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2020, 03:25 PM   #11
tubman
Senior Member
 
tubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Minnesota, Florida Keys
Posts: 5,486
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

I built an engine test stand about 10 years ago and have used it a bunch. I have had two flatheads, an early hemi, and an Olds Rocket on it so far, with at least one more to come. Probably not worth it though if you are only doing one engine. They're great for the 20 minute cam break-in on a new engine (easier to control), but don't over-do it. I particularly like them for checking out used engines to see what you really have. The hemi and a Mercury I checked were both unknown used engines and both turned out to be in excellent shape.
tubman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2020, 04:30 PM   #12
Karl Wolf
Senior Member
 
Karl Wolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Mill Valley,Ca.
Posts: 1,389
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

I bench ran a used 59AB,
wood blocks to hold the engine in place
used a radiator held in place by the hoses.
fed the ford fuel pump from a can.
original cast iron exhaust manifolds. No muffler... LOUD.
Oil pressure gauge.

Could have run it as long as I wanted...

Karl
Karl Wolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2020, 04:41 PM   #13
cas3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: sw minnesota
Posts: 2,008
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

the junk yards used to run em laying in an old tire, no radiator, rev the hell out of it to show us kids how good it was. used a spray bottle for fuel. run it until your finger is tired of pumping the bottle
cas3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2020, 07:56 PM   #14
Brian
Senior Member
 
Brian's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Masterton, New Zealand
Posts: 2,529
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

My opinion....people say that with new cam and lifters, the motor needs to be run at 2000 RPM for 20 minutes in order to run those components in.

New rings need to be run under load to get them bedded in correctly.
Therefore, achieve both jobs at once; get vehicle running, then DRIVE it.
__________________
Unfortunately, two half wits don't make a whole wit!
Brian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2020, 08:03 PM   #15
Talkwrench
Senior Member
 
Talkwrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 2,387
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian View Post
My opinion....people say that with new cam and lifters, the motor needs to be run at 2000 RPM for 20 minutes in order to run those components in.

New rings need to be run under load to get them bedded in correctly.
Therefore, achieve both jobs at once; get vehicle running, then DRIVE it.
Thats what I did.. load it up and run it reasonably hard. Back yourself if you have done the work !
__________________
"Came too close to dying to stop living now!"
Talkwrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2020, 05:00 AM   #16
jrvariel48
Senior Member
 
jrvariel48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 995
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

OK, putting the motor in the car to run it is not a problem.
One thing I must check before I do that is the bellhouse indexing.
To do that, I have to hand turn the motor.
I'm being told not to do that because it'll wipe the lube off the cam lobes.
The motor would have to be spun a minimum of two times, one to get the numbers and one to check after adjusting.
If I install the motor in the car and drive it, I run the risk of destroying the input shaft bearing...again. I don't want to do that.
I'm open to suggestions.
Thanks everyone.
jrvariel48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2020, 08:37 AM   #17
GOSFAST
Senior Member
 
GOSFAST's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 960
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrvariel48 View Post
OK, putting the motor in the car to run it is not a problem.
One thing I must check before I do that is the bellhouse indexing.
To do that, I have to hand turn the motor.
I'm being told not to do that because it'll wipe the lube off the cam lobes.
The motor would have to be spun a minimum of two times, one to get the numbers and one to check after adjusting.
If I install the motor in the car and drive it, I run the risk of destroying the input shaft bearing...again. I don't want to do that.
I'm open to suggestions.
Thanks everyone.
Hi Joe, I'm telling you, it would work fine indicating that hsg on ANY other 8BA block, it will work.

Done this hundreds of times on the "stick" Chevy's we've done. If you indicate a scattershield on any "stock" Chevy block, NOT an aftermarket one (SB's and BB's are the same), and then use it on still another block later on, you'll be safe, believe me!

But here's the "catch", we've never used any offset dowel pins or stepped ones to locate the new shield on any builds, nor have we "redrilled" new holes for any larger pins, we simply used the Lakewood "welded-washer" setup on each housing. You would indicate the hsg to the designated block using the indicator and the bolts to "center" it then weld the washers to the hsg while in position on the block. There was clearance, usually about .010"/.015" between the hsg pin holes and the existing dowels. This method allowed that same hsg to fit other OEM blocks without having to go all through it again! It works, we've probably done a couple hundred over the years! Lakewood G.M kit photo below only for comparison.

Now, for the initial firing, prime the entire unit, 4 qts of oil, with an external priming tank, leave the "grub" screw OUT (not in, good catch below here guys) this means no filter during the fire-up, and wrap it up. After it's all broken in, INSTALL the "grub" screw and plumb in the filter! Should be fine!

Thanks, Gary in N.Y.

P.S. Here's a shot of the Chevy setup I'm speaking about, for the Flathead you'd need to make a couple "weldable" washers. once those washers are tacked/welded to that hsg it will now fit other OEM blocks with no issues, been there, done it! If you happen to need "longer" Flathead pins that's not a real problem either, the pins would be "straight", same diameter as the factory pins to fit the block, no offsets! Indicate the hsg, weld the washers in place, done.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Lakewood Bellhousing Indexing Locaters.jpg (54.4 KB, 21 views)

Last edited by GOSFAST; 01-13-2020 at 01:03 PM. Reason: Correct info (again)
GOSFAST is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2020, 09:15 AM   #18
JSeery
Senior Member
 
JSeery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Wichita KS
Posts: 13,586
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

"Now, for the initial firing, prime the entire unit, 4 qts of oil, with an external priming tank, leave the "grub" screw in place (this means no filter during the fire-up), and wrap it up. After it's all broken in, remove the "grub" screw and plumb in the filter! Should be fine!"

Not sure I understand this, isn't the "grub" screw blocking the oil passage? I would think you would be stating it the other way around, the "grub" screw has to come out without the filter and back it with the filter. A mistake in this area will be catastrophic!!!
JSeery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2020, 09:55 AM   #19
flatjack9
Senior Member
 
flatjack9's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Oshkosh, Wi
Posts: 3,556
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

I agree w/JSeery
flatjack9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2020, 10:29 AM   #20
GOSFAST
Senior Member
 
GOSFAST's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 960
Default Re: Rebuilt motor start up

Quote:
Originally Posted by JSeery View Post
"Now, for the initial firing, prime the entire unit, 4 qts of oil, with an external priming tank, leave the "grub" screw in place (this means no filter during the fire-up), and wrap it up. After it's all broken in, remove the "grub" screw and plumb in the filter! Should be fine!"

Not sure I understand this, isn't the "grub" screw blocking the oil passage? I would think you would be stating it the other way around, the "grub" screw has to come out without the filter and back it with the filter. A mistake in this area will be catastrophic!!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by flatjack9 View Post
I agree w/JSeery
Good catch, guys!

Thanks, Gary in N.Y.

P.S. "Fixed", I shouldn't post till I'm entirely awake!!
GOSFAST is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:23 AM.