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Old 08-04-2020, 01:49 PM   #21
Jack Shaft
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Default Re: Electronic ignition advise

Adaptive dwell is one of the advantages of electronic ignition consistent coil soak yields consistent voltage regardless of gap.With manual timing its moot ,doesnt matter how hot or cold the spark is when the timing doesn't match rpm..
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Old 08-04-2020, 02:26 PM   #22
Purdy Swoft
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Default Re: Electronic ignition advise

I would think that leaving the ignition on could ruin any coil .
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Old 08-04-2020, 02:31 PM   #23
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Default Re: Electronic ignition advise

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Originally Posted by Jack Shaft View Post
Adaptive dwell is one of the advantages of electronic ignition consistent coil soak yields consistent voltage regardless of gap.With manual timing its moot ,doesnt matter how hot or cold the spark is when the timing doesn't match rpm..
Some have been known to use Mallory distributors with the Pertronix coil .
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Old 08-04-2020, 03:19 PM   #24
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Default Re: Electronic ignition advise

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Originally Posted by Purdy Swoft View Post
I would think that leaving the ignition on could ruin any coil .
Maybe so but I was referring to the Pertronix Ignition module being ruined if you leave the ignition on.
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Old 08-05-2020, 04:27 PM   #25
Purdy Swoft
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Default Re: Electronic ignition advise

Sorry, I know nothing about electronic ignition , that is the main reason that I don't use it . I just figure that leaving the ignition switch on isn't a good idea if the engine isn't running whether it be electronic or points ignition . .
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Old 08-06-2020, 09:37 AM   #26
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Default Re: Electronic ignition advise

Y-Blockhead: FYI

FSI uses Pertronix Ignitor II modules.

Instruction sheet For Zipper says module will be damaged if key is left on with engine not running.
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Old 08-06-2020, 04:59 PM   #27
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Default Re: Electronic ignition advise

It is funny that I have been told several times “it is very reliable, mine only quit once and now I carry a spare”.

I have driven 27k miles and never had an ignition failure with my 1930 Tudor with points.

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Old 08-06-2020, 08:00 PM   #28
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Default Re: Electronic ignition advise

Purdy did the use of the Flamethrower coil require 12 volt conversion?
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Old 08-06-2020, 09:02 PM   #29
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Default Re: Electronic ignition advise

I was told that the twelve volt version gave best results . This is mentioned on another thread here yesterday I think .
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Old 08-07-2020, 12:45 AM   #30
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Default Re: Electronic ignition advise

I have FSI ignition on mine, love it! Yes I carry an extra module, just like you carry spare points.
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Old 08-07-2020, 02:36 PM   #31
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Default Re: Electronic ignition advise

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Originally Posted by fredski53 View Post
I have FSI ignition on mine, love it! Yes I carry an extra module, just like you carry spare points.
Same.

98,000 miles on my NU-Rex. 1st module.
32,000 miles on my '31 S/W FSI 1st module.

I've worked on a couple cars with electronic ignition and the problem has always been an intermittent ground to the module.

But I also have 2 Model A's with the standard system and don't have trouble with those either. I have replaced the points, condensers and distributor bushings a couple times.
I don't have a strong preference.
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Old 08-07-2020, 03:32 PM   #32
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Default Re: Electronic ignition advise

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Originally Posted by Dave in MN View Post
Same.

98,000 miles on my NU-Rex. 1st module.
32,000 miles on my '31 S/W FSI 1st module.

I've worked on a couple cars with electronic ignition and the problem has always been an intermittent ground to the module.

But I also have 2 Model A's with the standard system and don't have trouble with those either. I have replaced the points, condensers and distributor bushings a couple times.
I don't have a strong preference.

I get totally what you all are saying.

I guess the thing is most of us claim to be Model-A 'restorers', ...and Yes, most of us like to upgrade things to better our vehicles. I guess if someone wants to install an electronic system just because it makes them feel better or happier, -then I say go for it. I guess I just struggle with the justification some hobbyists use when they claim they need the electronic ignition for more reliability and to be able to tour with their Model-A. A lot of misinformation out there on stuff like this.

Now this is just me personally, but having to invest $50.00 +/- for a spare module as a "just in case", and then going thru the hassle to exchange an electronic module on the side of the road seems pointless when about $20.00 gives you a set of points and condenser to carry if the need ever arose which can be exchanged and set in just a few moments. I suppose this discussion is just like choosing a suitable oil for a Model-A. No right or wrong answer.
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Old 08-14-2020, 12:35 PM   #33
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Default Re: Electronic ignition advise

Thanks for the TONS of info guys! I read every one and great arguments from both sides.
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Old 08-14-2020, 01:59 PM   #34
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Default Re: Electronic ignition advise

Here are a few thoughts of electronic ignition systems. Yes, they are great in modern cars that were designed for it from the ground up. If they do fail, you will find five parts stores in a 20 mile range that will have the parts on the shelf. No so much with any conversion kit.

I have two 1978 motorcycles. On one I did an "upgrade" to electronic ignition about ten years ago. It was trouble-free and maintenance free for about eight years. It ran beautifully...until it didn't. When it failed I barely limped home the 45 miles on two cylinders on a major highway. It was terrifying. My testing with a multi-meter was inconclusive. It took two weeks of back and forth mail to get the module tested, confirmed bad, and replaced. The replacement module was nearly $200.00 and the module failure damaged the coil...another $100.00.

My second bike I left with points. I took the time to really teach myself to maintain, adjust, and understand them (the Model A was a huge help in this regard). I keep a spare distributor plate in my storage compartment. It has new points and condensers, has been run-in tested, and I marked it so I know exactly where to set it so the timing is right. This spare set-up takes up about as much space as ham sandwich and cost less than $50.00. When I did have a breakdown, I had it swapped out and was back on the road in 15 minutes.

The Model A's original system is so easy and inexpensive to maintain, I would never consider changing it. Also, I prefer the original set up to the so-called 'modern points." The original points are easier to adjust, and I can do it without feeler gauges by simply counting the turns.

Whatever you decide, I wish you all the best.

Ken
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Old 08-17-2020, 06:57 AM   #35
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Default Re: Electronic ignition advise

Quote:
Originally Posted by KGBnut View Post
Here are a few thoughts of electronic ignition systems. Yes, they are great in modern cars that were designed for it from the ground up. If they do fail, you will find five parts stores in a 20 mile range that will have the parts on the shelf. No so much with any conversion kit.

I have two 1978 motorcycles. On one I did an "upgrade" to electronic ignition about ten years ago. It was trouble-free and maintenance free for about eight years. It ran beautifully...until it didn't. When it failed I barely limped home the 45 miles on two cylinders on a major highway. It was terrifying. My testing with a multi-meter was inconclusive. It took two weeks of back and forth mail to get the module tested, confirmed bad, and replaced. The replacement module was nearly $200.00 and the module failure damaged the coil...another $100.00.

My second bike I left with points. I took the time to really teach myself to maintain, adjust, and understand them (the Model A was a huge help in this regard). I keep a spare distributor plate in my storage compartment. It has new points and condensers, has been run-in tested, and I marked it so I know exactly where to set it so the timing is right. This spare set-up takes up about as much space as ham sandwich and cost less than $50.00. When I did have a breakdown, I had it swapped out and was back on the road in 15 minutes.

The Model A's original system is so easy and inexpensive to maintain, I would never consider changing it. Also, I prefer the original set up to the so-called 'modern points." The original points are easier to adjust, and I can do it without feeler gauges by simply counting the turns.

Whatever you decide, I wish you all the best.

Ken
Thanks Ken, I do appreciate the info!
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