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Old 05-07-2021, 05:17 PM   #1
springerpete
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Default dropping the pan

I'd like opinions on what is involved here. There is very little room between the pan and the bolt heads to fit a 1/2" socket. I have a thin wall socket but still had problems. What do you folks do ? It is worse on the rear of the engine . Always willing to see other opinions.
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Old 05-07-2021, 05:25 PM   #2
Synchro909
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Default Re: dropping the pan

Getting at those bolts is tight at the front and the back. My cars are drivers so I cut a slot in the heads of the bolts and use a square shanked screw driver. You clearly have hex heads so just keep at it. They'll all give up the fight in the end.
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Old 05-07-2021, 05:46 PM   #3
jb-ob
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Default Re: dropping the pan

Pete,

Be easy on yourself, jack up the front end and turn the steering to one side, locked. That will move the tie rod away from the front of the oil pan.

Yes a thin wall deep socket will reach, but when re-assembling only use a 1/4 drive ratchet so you don't find out how easy it is to snap a bolt in an difficult spot.......jb
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Old 05-07-2021, 05:47 PM   #4
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Default Re: dropping the pan

Try using a 1/4" drive socket set, it works well on the rear pan bolts too.
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Old 05-07-2021, 05:48 PM   #5
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Default Re: dropping the pan

Be sure to turn your wheels all the way to one side or the other. This gets your tie rod out of the way. A quarter inch socket set works good.
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Old 05-07-2021, 05:57 PM   #6
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Default Re: dropping the pan

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There's been numerous occasions fixing things where I needed to make/alter my own tools. Almost always has to do with access or clearance. In this case, what about buying the right size offset box wrench, and cut the rim off slightly as needed:


Wrench.jpg


All this tool needs to do is function as a breaker bar, you can spin it out the rest of the way with something else. If you need more leverage, slide a pipe over it.
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Old 05-07-2021, 06:00 PM   #7
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Old 05-07-2021, 07:05 PM   #8
Tom Endy
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Default Re: dropping the pan

Get some threaded stock the same thread size as the pan bolts. cut four pieces about two inches long and put a nut on them. Remove two bolts on each side and screw the four studs in place. Now when you take the other bolts out you will be able to let the pan drop onto the studs when the gasket breaks loose. They also come in handy when re-installing.

Remove the dripper tray to clean out the bottom of the pan. Use a long wooden hammer handle (a baseball bat works better). Put it down in the hole for the oil pump, Put your foot on the top of the pan and give a sharp thrust of the handle.

Use your foot to reinstall the dipper tray. Make sure you have it in place in the slots correctly.

When you re-install the pan glue the gasket to the top of the pan, do not put sealer on the top of the gasket, use axle grease. This way it will be easier to remove next time and you won't have to scrape pieces of gasket off the engine pan rails.

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Old 05-07-2021, 07:05 PM   #9
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Default Re: dropping the pan

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flathead View Post
Try using a 1/4" drive socket set, it works well on the rear pan bolts too.
In my tools the 1/4" drive deep socket has a thinner wall than the short socket, so I use the 1/4" drive deep socket. (I think the 1/4" deep sockets are Craftsman I bought back when Craftsman was still Craftsman).

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Old 05-07-2021, 07:16 PM   #10
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Default Re: dropping the pan

I use a 1/4” socket with a six inch extension and pan guides.
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Last edited by 700rpm; 05-07-2021 at 10:20 PM.
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Old 05-07-2021, 07:52 PM   #11
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Default Re: dropping the pan

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Originally Posted by Tom Endy View Post
Get some threaded stock the same thread size as the pan bolts. cut four pieces about two inches long and put a nut on them. Remove two bolts on each side and screw the four studs in place. Now when you take the other bolts out you will be able to let the pan drop onto the studs when the gasket breaks loose. They also come in handy when re-installing.


Tom Endy
i use Oil Pan Guides that are made for this purpose.
https://www.snydersantiqueauto.com/P...earchByKeyword
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Old 05-08-2021, 12:25 AM   #12
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Default Re: dropping the pan

I've never used guides to put the sump back on. I hold the A frame with one hand so that my forearm is under the sump. Once I lift it high enough to get my arm under it, it is easy to lift it into place by bending my wrist. I have a screw already set up in a socket on the battery powered (very low powered) rattle gun. One goes in VERY easily. The next is no more difficult, then you're pretty much finished.
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Old 05-08-2021, 10:05 AM   #13
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Default Re: dropping the pan

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Originally Posted by mercman from oz View Post
3/4" is a little big for the pan bolts
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Old 05-08-2021, 10:58 AM   #14
springerpete
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Default Re: dropping the pan

Wow, thanks for all the suggestions. My issue is clearance between the bolt head and the pan flange. I did turn the wheels for extra space. I could not find a 1/4" drive, thin wall deep socket but I do have a regular deep socket and just up the street is a machine shop. I will have them thin it out till it fits. Pan came down easily and tray came out when I dropped the pan on a layer of cardboard. Thanks again for all the suggestions, I've made notes fopr use later. Bill
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Old 05-08-2021, 01:10 PM   #15
Flathead
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Default Re: dropping the pan

Cheap foreign made sockets are ideal to grind down for special applications like this and should be strong enough for pan bolts. Good use for an odd or homeless socket.
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Old 05-08-2021, 01:54 PM   #16
Mister Moose
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Default Re: dropping the pan

Quote:
Originally Posted by springerpete View Post
My issue is clearance between the bolt head and the pan flange.
Why did they make the flange so close to cause interference with normal tools?
What tool did the factory use? (Rhetorical question)
What tool do the rebuilders use?
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Old 05-08-2021, 03:42 PM   #17
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Default Re: dropping the pan

Back about 1965 I had a fellow come up to me and asked about my coupe. he asked if I had problems with removing the pan bolts. He then said that he had a special speed wrench made for this. the next day he came by where I worked and handed it to me. A great gift and used many times. there must be more of these out there.
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Old 05-08-2021, 07:47 PM   #18
shew01
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Default Re: dropping the pan

Quote:
Originally Posted by noyo55 View Post
Back about 1965 I had a fellow come up to me and asked about my coupe. he asked if I had problems with removing the pan bolts. He then said that he had a special speed wrench made for this. the next day he came by where I worked and handed it to me. A great gift and used many times. there must be more of these out there.

Iím curious. Could you post a picture?


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Old 05-09-2021, 09:27 AM   #19
katy
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Default Re: dropping the pan

I just R&Rd the pan on my A yesterday, used a regular 6 point, 3/8" drive, S-K socket, no interference problems.

FWIW, that socket has been in use for over 60 years, so it's probably a little sloppy.
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Last edited by katy; 05-10-2021 at 10:40 AM. Reason: Addition
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Old 05-10-2021, 08:03 AM   #20
Patrick L.
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Default Re: dropping the pan

I just use a wobble socket. Its easy enough to grind the wall thinner if needed. After awhile the tool box gets full of stuff that has been specially 'adjusted'.
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