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Old 02-05-2019, 09:09 PM   #1
Jynx
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Default 30w oil

was told the other day that one of the fellas was using 30w diesel oil in his car any pros or cons from what i read it has different detergents
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Old 02-05-2019, 09:31 PM   #2
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Default Re: 30w oil

I use Shell Rotella 30W diesel oil; the previousowner mentioned that the zinc in the oil helps with the babbit bearings.
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Old 02-06-2019, 12:59 AM   #3
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Default Re: 30w oil

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Originally Posted by sinbad339 View Post
I use Shell Rotella 30W diesel oil; the previousowner mentioned that the zinc in the oil helps with the babbit bearings.
Zinc is a type of extreme pressure additive to prevent/reduce cam lobe/lifter wear in engines with high valve spring pressure. It had nothing to do with Babbitt bearings. Not needed there.
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Old 02-05-2019, 10:05 PM   #4
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Default Re: 30w oil

Don't think Rotella has zinc any more. Its a moot point in an A as zinc was not an additive when the Model A was new. Zinc was introduced for the high compression engines of the 50's and 60's
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Old 02-05-2019, 11:26 PM   #5
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Default Re: 30w oil

30W is fine for summer, I use 10W30 year around.
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Old 02-06-2019, 10:35 AM   #6
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Default Re: 30w oil

Note that the temperatures are in Centigrade (Celsius).
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Old 02-06-2019, 03:36 PM   #7
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Default Re: 30w oil

Valvoline VR1 racing oil has zinc, get at NAQPA
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Old 02-06-2019, 03:43 PM   #8
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Default Re: 30w oil

Hey Jynx, if you look for previous posts regarding motor oils you will find enough opinions to keep you busy for days. At the risk of being labeled a heretic I doubt that you could find a motor oil for automobiles that would not be adequate for a Model A.
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Old 02-06-2019, 04:10 PM   #9
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Default Re: 30w oil

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Hey Jynx, if you look for previous posts regarding motor oils you will find enough opinions to keep you busy for days. At the risk of being labeled a heretic I doubt that you could find a motor oil for automobiles that would not be adequate for a Model A.
I agree with that. Engine oils in the day were not very good. Even the cheapest oil available today is light years ahead of anything they had back then.
I use what ever oil is on special at the shops - usually 20W50. With a 180F thermostat, the engine temperatures are high enough that it does fine.
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Old 02-10-2019, 12:27 AM   #10
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Default Re: 30w oil

Quote:
Originally Posted by leo View Post
Hey Jynx, if you look for previous posts regarding motor oils you will find enough opinions to keep you busy for days. At the risk of being labeled a heretic I doubt that you could find a motor oil for automobiles that would not be adequate for a Model A.
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I agree with that. Engine oils in the day were not very good. Even the cheapest oil available today is light years ahead of anything they had back then.
I use what ever oil is on special at the shops - usually 20W50. With a 180F thermostat, the engine temperatures are high enough that it does fine.

You guys got that right! Use what every you want that will get you on the road.
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Old 02-06-2019, 06:59 PM   #11
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Default Re: 30w oil

I use Walmart brand 20-W-50
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Old 02-07-2019, 11:37 AM   #12
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Default Re: 30w oil

Rotella oil is fine for a Model A
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Old 02-07-2019, 11:50 AM   #13
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Default Re: 30w oil

I agree with Synchro909. Oils today are so much better than in 1930 that anything would be better. We shouldn't get all wrapped around recommendations from 1930. They were fine for the technology of the day, but we've come a long way in lubrication!

As to viscosity, modern multi-viscosity oils mean you don't have to change oil between summer and winter. The chart posted by katy in post #6 shows the whole picture. I use 20W-50 myself in my old Fords and have never had a problem. 10W-40 would be fine also.
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Old 02-07-2019, 03:05 PM   #14
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Default Re: 30w oil

Hello.


I am not sure if I have understood the core question correctly.

For vintage cars, a low viscosity can have the disadvantage that the shaft bearings leak leaking oil. Otherwise, a multi-grade oil is always better than a single range.

The most important is the API classification. Because of the non-ferrous metal compatibility. You should not go higher than "SC". Petrol engine oil API SC has anti-corrosion inhibitor, detergent cleaner, HD heavy duty additives. That is enough!

However, the oil still has to be changed many times (max. <1000 miles) because it runs without a filter and only then can the abrasion chips be taken out.
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Old 02-07-2019, 08:20 PM   #15
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Default Re: 30w oil

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Originally Posted by Werner View Post
Hello.


I am not sure if I have understood the core question correctly.

For vintage cars, a low viscosity can have the disadvantage that the shaft bearings leak leaking oil. Otherwise, a multi-grade oil is always better than a single range.

The most important is the API classification. Because of the non-ferrous metal compatibility. You should not go higher than "SC". Petrol engine oil API SC has anti-corrosion inhibitor, detergent cleaner, HD heavy duty additives. That is enough!

However, the oil still has to be changed many times (max. <1000 miles) because it runs without a filter and only then can the abrasion chips be
taken out.

From what I have read, not an expert.


One major reason for using multi grade oil is a large portion of wear occurs during motor warm up until the oil/motor is at operating temperature. Straight 30 weight thickens considerably at colder/cooler temps. A multi-grade like 10w30 will thicken to what a straight 10 grade oil thickens to at a cold temperature.


A lot of motors when the temp in late fall/early spring/winter do not warm up all the way unless using a thermostat or if partially blocking the radiator. So the straight weight 30 oil is thicker than ideal all at all times.


Use of a magnetic oil plug can catch quite a bit of the metallic bits that might be floating around in the oil, but if you are especially concerned about this the motor can be converted to an oil filter system. The figure most mentioned here is changing oil every 500 miles. Oil is cheap compared to chances of premature motor wear.
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Old 02-10-2019, 01:54 PM   #16
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Default Re: 30w oil

Quote:
Originally Posted by Werner View Post
Hello.


I am not sure if I have understood the core question correctly.

For vintage cars, a low viscosity can have the disadvantage that the shaft bearings leak leaking oil. Otherwise, a multi-grade oil is always better than a single range.

The most important is the API classification. Because of the non-ferrous metal compatibility. You should not go higher than "SC". Petrol engine oil API SC has anti-corrosion inhibitor, detergent cleaner, HD heavy duty additives. That is enough!

However, the oil still has to be changed many times (max. <1000 miles) because it runs without a filter and only then can the abrasion chips be taken out.
that is very old world thinking. just like the guys who tell you to use non detergent oils . why? if your engine is in good shape and bearings and rings tight, lighter oil flows better, and protects better than heavy oils with less chance of burning
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Old 02-09-2019, 12:20 PM   #17
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Default Re: 30w oil

The model A engine needs a certain amount of viscosity to cushion the bearings . Ford recommended 20w for winter and 40 w for summer . I use multi grade oil , but figure that a 10w whatever would be too thin to give the necessary viscosity for the older engines when warm . There is more to it than quick flow , in my opinion .
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Old 02-14-2019, 01:38 PM   #18
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Default Re: 30w oil

Wear happens with cold, thick oil.


At no point in normal operation will a 0W-40 get thinner than the SAE40 - they are both the same viscosity when hot, which is when they are the thinnest.


They BOTH thicken as they cool.



A 0W-40 works better than a SAE40, because it thickens less when cold - they're both as thin as each other when hot though. The difference is that the 0W will flow better cold, giving the best of both worlds.



It's a somewhat moot point though - not too many people are going to pay for 0W-40 and dump it every 1000 miles though!


Ours usually runs a 15W-40, more for cost/availability than anything.


How many model A owners even drive enough miles for the oil to impact the engine longevity anyway???
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Old 02-14-2019, 01:47 PM   #19
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Default Re: 30w oil

Quote:
Originally Posted by Allanw View Post
Wear happens with cold, thick oil.


At no point in normal operation will a 0W-40 get thinner than the SAE40 - they are both the same viscosity when hot, which is when they are the thinnest.


They BOTH thicken as they cool.



A 0W-40 works better than a SAE40, because it thickens less when cold - they're both as thin as each other when hot though. The difference is that the 0W will flow better cold, giving the best of both worlds.



It's a somewhat moot point though - not too many people are going to pay for 0W-40 and dump it every 1000 miles though!


Ours usually runs a 15W-40, more for cost/availability than anything.


How many model A owners even drive enough miles for the oil to impact the engine longevity anyway???

x2 - You did a much better job of describing what I was trying to say.
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Old 02-14-2019, 01:49 PM   #20
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Default Re: 30w oil

Quote:
Originally Posted by Allanw View Post
Wear happens with cold, thick oil.


At no point in normal operation will a 0W-40 get thinner than the SAE40 - they are both the same viscosity when hot, which is when they are the thinnest.
This makes sense to me but I remember reading in the owners manual for my Jeep that 5w-30 is only recommended for sustained temps below freezing AND that using 5w-30 in higher temps would lead to an increase in oil consumption compared to the 10w-30 recommended for above freezing use.

If they both flow like SAE 30 when hot (which they should), why would oil consumption change?
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