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Old 11-09-2019, 11:02 AM   #1
History
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Default Cracked Block

After changing a leaking and worn out water pump I noticed a wet spot under the water pump. Looks like the engine block has been let freeze at some point and cracked about a 3 inch long crack. It just seeps like you see around the head gaskets on some A engines but I'm sure will be a problem when I finally get on the road for any distance. Since I don't know if the engine is a worn out junker yet I've decided to try and JB Weld the crack. I figure since there is no pressure and I prep this correctly it should work and if it doesn't I can always go the distance and have it brazed or lock-stitched.

I've drained the coolant and removed the radiator so I could get to the crack. I've used a dremel to V the crack and expose clean metal around so the epoxy has something to stick to. I will drill at each end to stop further cracking. Should I tap those holes and put screws in? I've found another product similar to JB Weld and they even have a video on repairing an engine block. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=y-AT8f9J4_E


I read I believe a member here who said they have done this but used a vacuum and super glue before the JB Weld. Sounds reasonable to me and like a good idea but I don't know if there are any chemical reactions of the glue, antifreeze and the JB Weld?

I know some of you will say don't try this and I get that but I'm not willing to throw much capitol at this at the moment. I think I'm going to go for it and if it works or fails I'll post about it. You can point and say I told you so then. I believe it's all in the preparation but we will see.

Opinions anyway ????
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:07 AM   #2
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Default Re: Cracked Block

smear it with epoxy, maby in 5-10years you will have to do it again
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:51 AM   #3
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Default Re: Cracked Block

I did it on a Model T head with a nasty crack. Worked great. After it was well cured I refilled it, then when that was well cured I filed and sanded it smooth, then paint. Never leaked, couldn't tell there had ever been a crack. You may want to carefully inspect the rest of the block, frost cracks often times show up along the side of the engine. I used the original JB weld, the quick type doesn't seem quite as good. make sure you do a good job of mixing it. Sounds like your prep is good.
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Old 11-09-2019, 03:21 PM   #4
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Default Re: Cracked Block

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurt in NJ View Post
smear it with epoxy, maby in 5-10years you will have to do it again
Kurt, Does "epoxy" mean JB Weld or something else?
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Old 11-09-2019, 03:25 PM   #5
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Default Re: Cracked Block

JB Weld was developed for the Army specifically for fixing cracked cast iron engines. It's been used for this purpose on millions of engines with very good success.
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Old 11-09-2019, 03:38 PM   #6
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Default Re: Cracked Block

My car is gradually losing the joy that I had. I'm going from one repair to the next. And that for a 35,000 "Top Show Car". In this year I spent almost 4000 for spare parts.

My big frustration is that today I wanted to replace the valve cover after the timing gear renewed and see that suddenly cooling water in the valve chamber is high. Where the fine crack comes from is unclear.

Comparable unfortunately with the theme starter.
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Old 11-09-2019, 03:55 PM   #7
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Default Re: Cracked Block

Quote:
Originally Posted by History View Post
... but I don't know if there are any chemical reactions of the glue, antifreeze and the JB Weld?.

Opinions anyway ????
History, guten Abend you depressed suffering comrade!

I've made the experience that epoxy resins are very resistant to engine oil, but not against antyfreese (Glysantin). Because these are polyglycols that dissolve plastics.

The compromise solution would be to use only water with corrosion protection and drain it in winter.


I try it.
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Old 11-10-2019, 01:24 AM   #8
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Default Re: Cracked Block

Rest assured, if nothing else works, it can be saved by TIG welding.
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Old 11-10-2019, 02:56 AM   #9
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Default Re: Cracked Block

Yes you can drill the ends of the crack and push soft wire into the holes & 'peen' it in place with a tiny hammer. Or tap and screw small machine screws in it. Don't drive them in too hard.

I've always wanted to try making a dovetail style cut in the cracks of a water jacket and put tiny holes either side, and solder in some white metal. Never have & hope i never have to.

This video, rough, but it worked well.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Er0BZVfzyqk
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Old 11-10-2019, 09:50 AM   #10
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Default Re: Cracked Block

History:
That's a common place for it to crack from ice damage, I would also look on drivers side of block as well. It can be fixed permenantly through metal stitching.
https://www.jandm-machine.com/metalStitching.html
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Old 11-10-2019, 09:55 AM   #11
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Default Re: Cracked Block

Hello Werner:
That is stress crack we see often , It also can be repaired by metal stitching.
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Old 11-10-2019, 03:32 PM   #12
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Default Re: Cracked Block

Good evening together,

I'm unlucky! After sanding the crack in the engine block today, I've seen that it's more than 4 inches long. From the back in the 90 bend to the front to the outlet channel.

Therefore JB Weld can not help, because the crack runs between the two outlet holes and gets very hot.

I am at a loss as to whether this can be welded. "Stichin '" - I've looked at -, that I not useable because of the unfavorable surface curvature.
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Old 11-10-2019, 04:42 PM   #13
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Default Re: Cracked Block

This guy migs a cast iron pan. I havent tried this yet but will next time https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JS8OLJ07emg
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Old 11-10-2019, 04:56 PM   #14
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Default Re: Cracked Block

In the old days, we used "Water Glass". Sodium Silicate, you can buy it at a pharmacy. It was an egg preservative. You start up the A, let it warm up good. Then put 4oz of water glass in radiator. Put cap on and drive it. What happens is once the water glass hits air (crack) it hardens up. Been using it on old cars and tractors for years. Sounds Hoaky, but it works......
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Old 11-10-2019, 07:22 PM   #15
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Default Re: Cracked Block

What rod do you use to tig weld cast iron?
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Old 11-10-2019, 08:19 PM   #16
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Default Re: Cracked Block

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1928Mustang View Post
What rod do you use to tig weld cast iron?
ER70.
If you need more info, email me.
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Old 11-11-2019, 02:35 PM   #17
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Default Re: Cracked Block

Hallo and good evening,



in my engine block, the now 5 inch long crack is very deep too into the material. I try to weld this into a special TIG company. Maybe with success.

Does anyone know what that iron ore cast material it was at the building time?



And, by the way: Is there something important, which has to be considered before I lift the engine?



I thank you in advance!
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Citroen 11 CV, 1947
Honda CB 450 K 1, 1968
Hercules Wankel Rotary Engine, 1976 (Canadian version)
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Old 11-11-2019, 03:50 PM   #18
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Default Re: Cracked Block

A (good) welder can fix that crack. Amateurs usually cannot.
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Old 11-11-2019, 08:56 PM   #19
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Default Re: Cracked Block

at the ends of the crack drill a small hole then hammer in a piece of sorda now get a can of zotight follow instructions your problem is over
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Old 11-12-2019, 01:45 AM   #20
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Default Re: Cracked Block

Good moning Richard,


please tell me, what is "sorda", what is "zotight"?


Thanks.
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