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Old 04-27-2020, 01:25 PM   #1
BUBBAS IGNITION
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Default Coil , coil , coil

Hd to dig this up for another customer per email thought i would share . I have bought almost 200 of these over the last couple years and had a very low failure rate .....been a good alternative to the more expensive Bosch Blue ( my favorite ) Doesnt require a external resistor ......

https://www.amazon.com/Beru-Blue-Pri...8011518&sr=8-1
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Old 04-27-2020, 02:04 PM   #2
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Default Re: Coil , coil , coil

Thanks for the tip. Back in the day, we used to run Beru spark plugs in our snowmobiles. As I remember, they were very good. The only thing wrong withm was that the insulator on them was PINK.
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Old 04-27-2020, 11:51 PM   #3
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Same for me. I used Beru plugs in my Ski-Doo Elan back in 70`s. They were good...
Thanks for the tip.
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Old 04-28-2020, 07:03 AM   #4
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The best coil for a 1932 to 1948 Ford is a stock Ford coil rebuilt by
Skip Haney in Florida. He has been doing them over 20 years and
well over 20,000 of them. Lets ask the readers how many are not
happy with their coil he rebuilt. G.M.
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Old 04-28-2020, 11:13 AM   #5
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Default Re: Coil , coil , coil

And now, after that commercial break, we will resume our regular programming about the coils used in just about every other application..
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Old 04-28-2020, 11:52 AM   #6
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Default Re: Coil , coil , coil

Quote:
Originally Posted by G.M. View Post
The best coil for a 1932 to 1948 Ford is a stock Ford coil rebuilt by
Skip Haney in Florida. He has been doing them over 20 years and
well over 20,000 of them. Lets ask the readers how many are not
happy with their coil he rebuilt. G.M.
I have one of Skip's redone for 12V. Curious if it could be used with a Petronix's unit?

Also, when does the ohm rating of a coil come into play? I've seen 1.5 & 3.2 ohms as choices.

As much as I try, I have a hard time understanding electrical theory.
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Old 04-28-2020, 01:21 PM   #7
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Default Re: Coil , coil , coil

Quote:
Originally Posted by G.M. View Post
The best coil for a 1932 to 1948 Ford is a stock Ford coil rebuilt by Skip Haney in Florida. He has been doing them over 20 years and well over 20,000 of them. Lets ask the readers how many are not happy with their coil he rebuilt. G.M.

This can't be emphasized too strongly or too often. Rebuilt coils by Skip are the best!!!...
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Last edited by petehoovie; 04-28-2020 at 03:51 PM.
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Old 04-28-2020, 01:26 PM   #8
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Default Re: Coil , coil , coil

Tim, in simple terms you are just trying to get the proper current at the points. Because the amps, resistance and voltage are all related it is easy to just look at the resistance. In a 12v system that turns out to be in the 3.0 ohm range. So if you have a 1.5 ohm coil (which was the common one for a 6v system) and you couple it with a 1.5 ohm ballast resistor you are at around 3.0 ohm overall. Or you can use a 3.0 ohm coil in a 12v system and no ballast resistor. These are just round numbers for examples, but that's the general idea.

There are advantages to running a 1.5 ohm coil with a ballast resistor, which is similar to why Ford ran the ballast resistor with the original 6v coils. But, for simplicity it is easier to just run the 3.0 ohm coils with 12v.

So, 1.5 ohm coil + 1.5 ohm ballast resistor = 3.0 total ohms
Or just a 3.0 ohm coil = 3.0 total ohms

Last edited by JSeery; 04-28-2020 at 01:36 PM.
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Old 04-28-2020, 03:04 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by tubman View Post
And now, after that commercial break, we will resume our regular programming about the coils used in just about every other application..
Take a deep breath and smile. Over time you will most
likely see more of the same. It's important new people
know how to keep their old Fords running. G.M.
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Old 04-28-2020, 03:20 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JSeery View Post
Tim, in simple terms you are just trying to get the proper current at the points. Because the amps, resistance and voltage are all related it is easy to just look at the resistance. In a 12v system that turns out to be in the 3.0 ohm range. So if you have a 1.5 ohm coil (which was the common one for a 6v system) and you couple it with a 1.5 ohm ballast resistor you are at around 3.0 ohm overall. Or you can use a 3.0 ohm coil in a 12v system and no ballast resistor. These are just round numbers for examples, but that's the general idea.

There are advantages to running a 1.5 ohm coil with a ballast resistor, which is similar to why Ford ran the ballast resistor with the original 6v coils. But, for simplicity it is easier to just run the 3.0 ohm coils with 12v.

So, 1.5 ohm coil + 1.5 ohm ballast resistor = 3.0 total ohms
Or just a 3.0 ohm coil = 3.0 total ohms
JS, It's important not to get to little or to much voltage to the coil.
To little, that is much below 3.5 and it won't start or may just catch
as you leave of the starter button. The engine is still spinning and
the voltage go's up a little and the engine fires. To much voltage
and the points arc and point life is reduced. The large diameter
original resisters are best. I don't like the skinny little replacements
they seem to get to hot for me. The main thing people have to be
careful of is leaving the ignition switch on. If the points are closed
then the coil becomes a big resister and melts the material in the
coil and can even crack the case. I know this is repetitive but if it
saves one coil it's worth it. And NO they don't work with Petronx.
G.M.
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Old 04-28-2020, 03:25 PM   #11
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Default Re: Coil , coil , coil

GM, believe that is original Ford coil information, I was responding to 12v "tin can" coils. I like Fords original design with the ballast resistor and think they are good idea for the 12v systems for the same reasons Ford used them. But in a modified vehicle you can get by without them.

I'm sure ignition switch being left on has been the death of many a coil!

On the original Ford coil/ignition circuit (which I have very limited experience with ), I believe the coils are in the .7 to .8 ohm range and the total circuit specification is 1.0 to 1.35 ohms. So that would leave the ballast resistor in the .3 to .55 range. And I think they are spec'd at .36 ohms cold and .56 ohms hot.

Last edited by JSeery; 04-28-2020 at 03:54 PM.
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Old 04-28-2020, 03:34 PM   #12
G.M.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JSeery View Post
GM, believe that is original Ford coil information, I was responding to 12v "tin can" coils. I like Fords original design with the ballast resistor and think they are good idea for the 12v systems for the same reasons Ford used them. But in a modified vehicle you can get by without them.

I'm sure ignition switch being left on has been the death of many a coil!
Maybe we should make a small thermal switch to mount on the
coil?? G.M.
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Old 04-28-2020, 03:38 PM   #13
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I am going to get Skip to run some heat tests on a coil that is
left on with the points closed to see how fast and how hot it
gets. G.M.
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Old 04-28-2020, 03:54 PM   #14
JSeery
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Maybe we should make a small thermal switch to mount on the
coil?? G.M.
Good idea! Also would be interesting to see the numbers on the coil test.
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Old 04-28-2020, 05:34 PM   #15
Tim Ayers
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Default Re: Coil , coil , coil

Quote:
Originally Posted by JSeery View Post
Tim, in simple terms you are just trying to get the proper current at the points. Because the amps, resistance and voltage are all related it is easy to just look at the resistance. In a 12v system that turns out to be in the 3.0 ohm range. So if you have a 1.5 ohm coil (which was the common one for a 6v system) and you couple it with a 1.5 ohm ballast resistor you are at around 3.0 ohm overall. Or you can use a 3.0 ohm coil in a 12v system and no ballast resistor. These are just round numbers for examples, but that's the general idea.

There are advantages to running a 1.5 ohm coil with a ballast resistor, which is similar to why Ford ran the ballast resistor with the original 6v coils. But, for simplicity it is easier to just run the 3.0 ohm coils with 12v.

So, 1.5 ohm coil + 1.5 ohm ballast resistor = 3.0 total ohms
Or just a 3.0 ohm coil = 3.0 total ohms
Thank you,
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