Go Back   The Ford Barn > General Discussion > Model A (1928-31)

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-14-2012, 08:38 AM   #1
DR
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 24
Default Painting a Model A 1930

Hello,

It has been some time since the old girl was painted. Where is the best place to buy paint, and what kind should I use? Also how much paint will be required to paint the under body, fenders, and body? I am trying to restore this properly and could use some assistance. I will likely be buying the paint in the U.S. Canadian standards has went to water base paints not good from what I am hearing. I am referring to Automotive paints.

thanks

Last edited by DR; 08-14-2012 at 09:46 AM. Reason: clarification
DR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2012, 09:03 AM   #2
Terry, NJ
Senior Member
 
Terry, NJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bucks Co, Pa
Posts: 3,420
Default Re: Painting a Model A 1930

I think you're refering to house paint, not auto paint. Well, You have much to learn! I'm in the same position and my head is spinning. V.O.C.s is part of it, laquer is another (avoid). Etching primer and filling primer. Phosphoritic acid body wash. Wet or Dry sandpaper. HVLP spray guns. And Preparation, Preparation, Preparation! As a friend, who is in this business said to me," a $10,000 paint job can't save $300 worth of bad body work" You will learn about body fillers and when to use them. And I haven't even touched on damage repair yet. Yes for us amateurs, it is a long job. My theory is to repair everything I can, "rough in" the body filler and let a Pro finish and paint the car. I will also "Prime" some parts. I hope this helps!
Terry




Quote:
Originally Posted by DR View Post
Hello,

It has been some time since the old girl was painted. Where is the best place to buy paint, and what kind should I use? Also how much paint will be required to paint the under body, fenders, and body? I am trying to restore this properly and could use some assistance. I will likely be buying the paint in the U.S. Canadian standards has went to water base paints not good from what I am hearing.

thanks
Terry, NJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Old 08-14-2012, 09:13 AM   #3
Terry, NJ
Senior Member
 
Terry, NJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bucks Co, Pa
Posts: 3,420
Default Re: Painting a Model A 1930

Some manufacturers (US) But not all!
PPG, Kirker paints, Sherwin Williams, DuPont, Magnet paints. Body guys have an unwritten rule that if you use a certain manufacturer's primer, it's best that you stick with their paints too. Kirker makes a "kit" for beginners and DIYers that is inexpensive and I've heard good things about. Go to all their sites and read up on each.
Terry
Terry, NJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2012, 09:46 AM   #4
DR
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 24
Default Re: Painting a Model A 1930

thanks
DR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2012, 11:25 AM   #5
Bob C
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: So Cal
Posts: 6,856
Default Re: Painting a Model A 1930

This is from a post on Auto Body Store.com
bhawk
A New Member


Join DateJun 2006Posts12

I'm in Canada and as of December 2010 they outlawed solvent based color for auto refinishing, so we have to use water borne color coats. They allow 2.1 VOC clears.
I sprayed one car a few years ago with solvent based urethane base coat\clear coat in my home shop and the job came out very well. Thanks to Len and others on this site who helped me through it.
Now, my son wants me to paint his truck, but I have to use water borne color and I can't get much info from anyone on how to DIY in a home shop.
So, hopefully Len will begin to use it and pass on some tips on how to spray a car at home for those of us that restore a car once every few years.
I did read somewhere that water borne color doesn't change much over time, so one can spray a hood and door today, and do the trunk lid tomorrow, and the rest of the body a few days later and the colors will still match. Anyone know if that is true? That would be good for the home booth guy like me. Thanks to all on this site for sharing experience and tips.
Bob C is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2012, 01:56 PM   #6
Purdy Swoft
Senior Member
 
Purdy Swoft's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Alabama
Posts: 7,808
Default Re: Painting a Model A 1930

When I was in the colision repair business, Some of the major paint companies offered a limited lifetime warranty for qualified professional painters. It was required that you used their full line and not mix brands of primer, hardners,reducers and so forth. I used Sherwin Williams at the end. Single stage urethane seems to be the most durable, even if left outside for extended periods. You can spend a small fortune on paint, necessary additives and primers. If the car is stored inside it is not a critical as to the type finish that is used. A major consideration should be that paints and primers that use an activator or isocyanate hardner is poisonous. To be safe when useing activated paints and primers is to use a painters suit with a mask that provides fresh air for breathing. It will be kind of expensive for a one time use. The easiest system for a novice home painter is either acrylic lacquer or nitro cellulose lacquer. Lacquer dries fast and doesn't get full of dust and bugs like enamel types, whether urethane or otherwise. If you get a run or other defect in lacquer, it can be sanded out and resprayed in a matter of minutes, not so with others. Acrylic lacquer is a hard finish but will not hold up well if left outside. Acrylic lacquer won't fill scratches greater than what is left by 320 sandpaper. Nitro type lacquer is softer but fills much coarser scratches. Most older painters probably sprayed lacquer type paints for years with no paint mask. The biggest problem with lacquers is finding suitable thinners. I use the slowest grade thinner that i can find with lacquers. Good usable lacquer thinner is expensive, sometimes over thirty dollars per gallon and getting very hard to find. Don't even think about thinning lacquer paints with the clean up type thinner sold at Walmart. Macs in Lockport NY. probably still has PPG acrylic lacquer. I know that they use to list almost all of the original colors but they are pricey. Hibernia restorations handles nitro type lacquer and acrylic lacquer and can custom mix the model A colors phone 973-627-1882 . Nitro cellulose lacquer is less expensive. Smart shopper, in KY is a good source for name brands and low cost paint and body supplies. phone 800-541-0399 and ask for their free catalog. I like Featherfill primer and get the freshist supply from Eastwood. Featherfill is a very high build primer that contains NO poison isocyanates and is arround sixty bucks per gallon. The hardner is included as in four tubes of peroxide as used with fiberglass resin, it fills better than any primer that I've ever used.. It ius best to use dark primer with dark colors so if it gets scratched, it won't be as obvious and it covers better. Featherfill is offered in light gray or black. There are plenty of choices, I've used lots of different brands on mine, even Rustoleum but that another story , too long to get into now.
Purdy Swoft is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2012, 02:16 PM   #7
PetesPonies
Senior Member
 
PetesPonies's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Maryland and South Carolina
Posts: 307
Default Re: Painting a Model A 1930

DR . . if you wish, you may PM me and I'd be happy to sort out exactly what you need based on what you can do etc. There are many ways to get a quality paint job and sometimes laying out everything on a forum just opens up cans and cans of worms. But tell me your experience and equipment and I'd be glad tp help.
__________________
Pete's Ponies
Mustang RUSToration & Performance
PetesPonies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2012, 03:31 PM   #8
V4F
Senior Member
 
V4F's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: ca.
Posts: 2,510
Default Re: Painting a Model A 1930

oregon still has good auto paint !
__________________
V4f
V4F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2012, 08:39 PM   #9
doriens 1930
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 14
Default Re: Painting a Model A 1930

Dont be affaid of water based paint .just remember air flow you can get hand held venturi fans from paint jobber.Get a good line of paint and use the complete line dont mix and match .Sherwin-williams has a great line and so does bafs. I have both lines in my shop at this time the base is the only water the rest is still solvent. water base is just as user friendly as reg. base coats just spray and dry each coat before appling next coat and dont pound the color on it will be wet for days. again air flow is the key. and use all waterbase cleaners you dont went any solvent residue on your panels. As with any paint job its all in the prep work good luck.
doriens 1930 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:56 PM.