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Old 01-16-2020, 05:05 PM   #1
Beater
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Default inside paint

who know what the paint is that you see the inside of engines and transmitions painted with red oxide color and why
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Old 01-16-2020, 05:46 PM   #2
Bob C
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Default Re: inside paint

Glyptal
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Old 01-16-2020, 06:22 PM   #3
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Default Re: inside paint

did ford do this on the A from the factory?
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Old 01-16-2020, 06:30 PM   #4
Will N
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Default Re: inside paint

No this was not done at the factory. The Glyptal is supposed to seal porous cast iron, and promote better oil circulation as the oil will shed from the paint and drain down to the pan. Which is what happens anyway when the cast iron gets seasoned after a few miles of use. IMHO, just another add on option an engine rebuilder can pocket.
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Old 01-16-2020, 10:40 PM   #5
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Default Re: inside paint

Standard equipment on later Hudson’s supposed to help oil flow and seal the castings.Must have worked my ex 49 Hudson is still around.
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Old 01-16-2020, 11:46 PM   #6
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Default Re: inside paint

The red oxide sealer used on the inside of engines and gear boxes is used to seal the porous castings, and also used to prevent any lose scale on the inside of the castings from coming lose and getting into the wrong places. Actually very necessary to have, but not absolutely necessary. I spent many years in building power trains for Skagit Corporation in Sedro-Woolley and we sealed all of our gear boxes with a red oxide lacquer sealer made by the Preservative Paint Company.
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Old 01-17-2020, 12:57 PM   #7
Jim Brierley
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Default Re: inside paint

If it's not put in there, it won't cause any troubles. IMO, not worth doing.
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Old 01-17-2020, 04:51 PM   #8
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Default Re: inside paint

I read somewhere that it can also lessen the chance of rust from condensation in vehicles that are not driven frequently or, driven for short trips and do not get up to temp. Seemed a bit of a stretch to me at the time but can't rule it out.
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Old 01-17-2020, 05:29 PM   #9
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Default Re: inside paint

Glyptal was a brand name company formed by Thomas Edison during the early General Electric years. Always the inventor, he wanted a branch company that would develop different coating materials to take the harsh environment of the internal workings of electric motors and generators. The Glyptal 1201 was one of the first high temp alkyd resin enamel protective coatings. The company was spun off in 1985 but is still a manufacturer of quite a few different formulations of electrical insulation coatings. The 1201 formula is the one generally used for the inner surfaces of iron castings for engine blocks, power transmissions, electric generators, and electric motors & drives as well as a lot of other electrical devices & terminals. The stuff can take temperatures up to 135 C and bathing in motor oil pretty well. It's been in use for stuff like this since it became available back in 1914. The more it gets baked, the harder it becomes. Folks that use in in engines swear by it since many have overhauled the same engines more often than most for irrigation pumps where they wear them out pretty regularly. We ran our pumps for several weeks straight on the farm when I was a kid. We would shut them down to transfer to a different pipeline and do regular hourly maintenance. They basically ran all summer long with only brief stoppages.
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Old 01-17-2020, 11:05 PM   #10
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Default Re: inside paint

Glyptal works well BUT you must have the surface very clean and grease free of the stuff will not adhere to the surface and can flake off. New castings are not a problem but an enging that has been in surface has to really clean.


A casting that had been painted on the inside with Glyptal is very easy to clean when doing an overhaul.


Chris W.

Last edited by CWPASADENA; 01-17-2020 at 11:05 PM. Reason: TYPO
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Old 01-18-2020, 01:51 PM   #11
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Default Re: inside paint

https://www.google.com/search?client...lating+Varnish
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