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Old 04-27-2019, 05:40 PM   #1
adileo
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Default Thinking out of box

So today a good friend (35 three window couple with juice brakes) attend
our first car show of season. We started talking about installing new brake pad on my 39 and his 35 (which has same brakes).

Neither of us are experts with these brakes. We started to discuss ways of viewing into the system while making the adjustments. After a few minutes we came up with cutting a piece of sheet metal the same size as the inner drum with a center hole large enough to slip up to the brake shoes. With that, one would be able to adjust the shoes and see if top and bottom of shoes are hitting evenly onto drum.

What’s your thoughts.
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1939 Deluxe coupe
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Old 04-27-2019, 06:16 PM   #2
Ggmac
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Default Re: Thinking out of box

If the idea is to visualize the adjustment , I would drill a small hole in the backing plate and use the bore cameras available on Amazon for $30 . Then plug the hole with a rubber plug/grommet . If your thinking of having a full size gauge ( lack of better word ) I'd be concerned about runout of your actual drum /axle . Even if only a few thousand it would be enough .
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Old 04-27-2019, 07:45 PM   #3
Ken/Alabama
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Default Re: Thinking out of box

This is the procedure I use for the Lockheed brakes. Found these instructions years ago.

Adjusting '39-'42 Brakes: This is from a collection of tips sent to me from "rumble seat"

I used to hate these brakes because of the adjustable double anchor when I was a mechanic in the mid fifties. Then a fellow mechanic showed me a Ford Service bulletin. Ever since then, I have preferred these to the '46-'48 units since I can get a better adjustment.

These are Lockheed brakes which use eccentric washers in conjunction with non-eccentric anchor pins to position the shoes. The top of the shoe is controlled by an eccentric cam (usually 11/16") located near the top of the shoe. The anchor pins, located at the bottom of the backing plate, control the shoe position by turning the eccentric washers at the bottom of the shoe. These anchor pins have locating on the elongated 1/4" adjuster. The locating marks may be a dot or an arrow, I'm assuming everything is in good condition and not rusty or frozen.

Step 1: Loosen the anchor pin large lock nuts (usually 3/4") on both shoes of one wheel just barley enough to permit turning the 1/4" anchor pin adjusters. Now, turn both of the 1/4" adjusters so the locator marks face directly towards each other. This next point is important .... All further adjustments are made by turning the anchor pins (1/4") and eccentric (11/16") downwards.

Step 2: Back off the upper eccentric cam adjusters on both shoes until the wheel rotates freely.

Step 3: Now turn one of the upper eccentric (11/16") until the wheel cannot be turned.

Step 4: Now turn it's 1/4" anchor pin adjuster downward until the wheel just turns freely. This lowers the shoe and moves the toe of the shoe away from the drum and results in fuller shoe contact.

Step 5: Now go back to Step 3 and do it and step 4 again to the same shoe. Repeat as necessary until turning the 1/4" anchor pin adjuster will no longer free up the wheel. Back off both anchor pin adjuster and upper eccentric just enough so the wheel has a slight drag. Tighten the anchor pin lock nut (3/4") without letting the anchor pin adjuster move. Now do the other shoe the same way.
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Old 04-27-2019, 09:47 PM   #4
ford38v8
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Default Re: Thinking out of box

Andy, KRW made a gauge that permitted full view and measurement of clearance. It installed as a hub does, and had a single arm up to measure the clearance at the shoe surface. Good luck finding one, but something of this sort, made from a scrap drum would provide a much more accurate tool than sheet metal. I wish I had one just for kicks, as I don't find the adjustments to be that difficult.
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Old 04-27-2019, 09:57 PM   #5
Tinker
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Default Re: Thinking out of box

Don't forget to arc the shoes.
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Old 04-28-2019, 07:28 AM   #6
Jersey Devil
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Default Re: Thinking out of box

Andy

Nice to see you yesterday at the Roebling show. Your 39 coupe is very nice and the original lacquer paint is exceptional. It shows that you are a caring owner.

Tom
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Old 04-28-2019, 09:44 AM   #7
adileo
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Default Re: Thinking out of box

Tom, thanks it’s always great seeing you at a show. Really enjoy our conversations. Your compliment means a lot, since both of your classics are two of finest in New Jersey.

Hope to see you again soon.
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