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Old 08-17-2013, 04:29 PM   #21
columbiA
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Default Re: steering box rebuild.

When I rebuilt my 2-tooth gear,I found that the old worm & sector were in good condition.I had the sector hsg machined to fit needle brgs as well as boring the outer end of hsg to fit a modern oil seal.The inner end of hsg was cut back .140" to provide clearance for a Torrington needle thrust brg to replace the brass washer.I used the lower plate with the tube to prevent oil leaks into light switch.I also used the short P -arm along with Teflon ball seats & new steering balls.It has not leaked any oil in over 14,000 miles.To me,it steers just as easy as an F -100 unit & looks original.I have mentioned this several times in the past,but it seems that no one bothers to check for previous posts on the same subject


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Old 02-23-2014, 10:16 AM   #22
Growley bear
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Default Re: steering box rebuild.

I just my Model A out for a shake down after 2 months in the shop. One of the items on the list was to rebuild the two tooth steering gear. I repaired the threaded end of the steering shaft with the kit from Snyder's-- installed new sector shaft bushings and a very good used original sector shaft. I adjusted the bearing preload and used a dial indicator to set the worm and sector clearance per Les Andrews book. This is a time consuming project but the end result was well worth the effort. I have a shortened steering arm and the Teflon inserts in the tie rod ends and drag link and it is so smooth that I had to look a couple of times to make sure that I was driving the same Model A.

Chet
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Old 02-23-2014, 10:41 AM   #23
RockHillWill
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Default Re: steering box rebuild.

I personally am of the opinion that I would NOT use the needle bearings under any conditions as my concern is that regardless of the bore/fit/hardness concerns or adjustments the roller bearings are not being properly utilized. The rollers in the roller bearing are meant to be in constant rotation and sized by calculating that the roller bearing 'roller' diameter is of such a diameter compared to the shaft diameter that the 'start/stop' points of each diameter no not overlap each other in a specified time frame.(similar to multiple valve springs). The way the roller bearings are used in a steering box the roller in the roller bearing never make one continuous rotation and therefore contacts the same spot on the sector shaft causing a high impact area that repeats itself with EACH steering wheel movement.

This is only my thinking, but it seems to be without question that a properly sized bushing used with a properly hardened shaft is the most efficient way to cope with the short range reversing loads, as no matter the clearance, the load is absorbed over MOST of the length of the bushings and MOST of the diameter of the sector shaft. A simple look at the end view of the contact areas of the two roller/shaft diameters quickly displays the fact that the entire load is placed at the INTERSECTION of two tangential diameters as opposed to the OVERLAPPING contact areas created by two concentric diameters.

The steering input loads are the same regardless of the bearing arrangements, but with the roller to roller condition the unit load numbers are increased GREATLY, and I would think that greatly reduces longevity. Additionally, if only one of the roller bearings should fail, dislodge and hang up between the remaining nearest 'good' rollers, I could easily envision a locking up of the steering box. I have seen this in machine failures.

It is the back and forth movement as opposed to the full rotation of the roller bearing and the high unit loading that gives me the greatest concern.


As always, this is just a thought.
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Last edited by RockHillWill; 02-23-2014 at 10:50 AM.
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Old 02-23-2014, 10:51 AM   #24
Growley bear
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Default Re: steering box rebuild.

Roller bearings could damage a good sector shaft. Henry had a reason for using bushings rather than roller (needle) bearings.

Chet
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Old 02-23-2014, 12:15 PM   #25
Tom Wesenberg
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Default Re: steering box rebuild.

I also agree with Will, and have seen that condition many times with needles in U joints in the drive driveshafts on newer cars, like 50's - 70's cars.
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Old 02-23-2014, 01:23 PM   #26
Growley bear
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Default Re: steering box rebuild.

A tip for someone who may not have disassembled a two tooth steering box. I tried following the directions to remove the sector shaft end play adjustment screw but the screw won't back out as the end that contacts the sector shaft is usually somewhat mushroomed. I remove the sector shaft housing and shaft first then remove the lock nut from the adjusting screw and remove the screw through to the inside of the housing.

Chet
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Old 03-09-2018, 01:28 PM   #27
MrBruce
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Default Re: steering box rebuild.

Speaking from experience, I had to try the needle bearings when they first hit the market along with my touring buddy (we both did). I was concerned right away with the fit of the sector shaft and the housing with needle bearings (not tight like bushings). I ran them for a while and then didn't like the adjustment and pulled them out (both of us did) and went back to bushings honed to fit the shaft (no play when honed). That was over 27 years ago and still working great. About time to re-do steering, engine, brakes, tires, and trans bearings. Just my experience with them. Bruce
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