Go Back   The Ford Barn > General Discussion > Early V8 (1932-53)

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-03-2015, 07:45 AM   #101
farmboy
Senior Member
 
farmboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Rector, AR
Posts: 167
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

It's been really busy around the farm lately with harvest, but I have one of my guys at work that has really taken intestest in the Pop Palmer truck project. We had a little time the other morning, so demantled a lot of the bed on the truck getting ready for removal. Check out what they lined the bed with so grain wouldn't leak out through the wood... Pretty cool!
farmboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2015, 08:54 AM   #102
done4
Senior Member
 
done4's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Union Pier MI
Posts: 336
Send a message via Yahoo to done4
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

That's the way it was, porcelain signs where used every where from cars to houses and out buildings. To bad they are cut up, those are highly collectable. Hang whats left up in your barn. Nice find.
__________________
Still smokin tires and cigars
done4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Old 10-03-2015, 12:44 PM   #103
Vanspeed
Senior Member
 
Vanspeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Waterford, Mich.
Posts: 2,973
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

Wow Sinclair signs! Very cool, I would also hang those up. When I bought my 29 pickup it had a tin roof over it. After getting it off I found out it was a 1930's coca cola sign.
__________________
Respecting and Resurrecting Ford Model A's.
Vanspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2015, 06:48 PM   #104
farmboy
Senior Member
 
farmboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Rector, AR
Posts: 167
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

I haven't posted in a while from being busy in the field! But I have quite a few parts in and getting the engine professionally rebuilt. I also got the sweet looking tires to put on it when time comes! I should have a busy winter working on this ole beauty !

As I drive the cotton picker I was thinking yesterday about working on the brakes as I know that will probably be a big deal where do you think I should start? Ha ha

Thanks Bret
Attached Images
File Type: jpg image.jpg (46.5 KB, 73 views)
farmboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2015, 02:11 PM   #105
COE Dan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Now in Wichita, KS
Posts: 246
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

The '36 trucks have mechanical brakes as you likely know already. Here’s one link to diagrams and a parts list for 35-37 truck brakes (there are likely others):

http://restoreyourford.com/1935tbrake.shtml

The advantage to mechanical brakes is they never leak and mechanical adjustment is all that's required. This means your parts may still be serviceable (as opposed to a hydraulic system that likely would have been destroyed by corrosion by now).

Here’s a 10-step guide for your brake rebuilding effort:

1) Don’t dive right into disassembly.
2) Keeping everything fully assembled, clean as much crud off the parts as you can so you can see how everything connects.
3) Take pictures of everything fully assembled. Pay particular attention to where clevises connect, which side of the clevis pins the cotter pins are on (it may not matter in most cases but in some cases it may), which direction bell cranks are mounted, and where any bends or curves are and what their orientations are. I can't emphasize how helpful this will be when you go to reassemble. Shop manual diagrams often don’t cover everything you might need to know.
4) Now you can start disassembly - continue to take pictures. Sometimes it's helpful to know how you took it apart.
5) Label everything.
6) Clean everything. If you can lay out your parts on a floor in relative positions, your labels and parts will remain associated while you clean individual items.
7) Inspect all the parts for serviceability. Mechanical brakes are susceptible to worn shafts, inadvertent bends, excessive play in connections (clevis pins/holes, etc.) and such. If you can’t find specs on how much wear/play to accept - ask Ford Barn. Someone out there should be able give you good information.
8) Replace all unserviceable parts. I'm not certain on the availability of mechanical brake parts for the big trucks as I haven’t dabbled in the big ones. Conceptually, they aren’t much different than the cars
9) Reassemble. One caveat - the truck may have had the brakes modified or erroneously reassembled in the past. If so, your pictures won’t tell you that. If parts don’t look right or fit right (minus allowance given for adjustments), there may be a problem. I’d seek advice from Ford Barn for this too.
10) Adjust and drive.

If I've forgotten anything, someone please speak up. Once adjusted correctly, mechanical brakes should provide years of dependable service - just remember, the stopping power is adequate, not great, with mechanical brakes.

Can I ask where you got your tires?

Looking forward to seeing some more progress pictures,

Dan
COE Dan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2015, 09:23 PM   #106
farmboy
Senior Member
 
farmboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Rector, AR
Posts: 167
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

Quote:
Originally Posted by COE Dan View Post
The '36 trucks have mechanical brakes as you likely know already. Hereís one link to diagrams and a parts list for 35-37 truck brakes (there are likely others):

http://restoreyourford.com/1935tbrake.shtml

The advantage to mechanical brakes is they never leak and mechanical adjustment is all that's required. This means your parts may still be serviceable (as opposed to a hydraulic system that likely would have been destroyed by corrosion by now).

Hereís a 10-step guide for your brake rebuilding effort:

1) Donít dive right into disassembly.
2) Keeping everything fully assembled, clean as much crud off the parts as you can so you can see how everything connects.
3) Take pictures of everything fully assembled. Pay particular attention to where clevises connect, which side of the clevis pins the cotter pins are on (it may not matter in most cases but in some cases it may), which direction bell cranks are mounted, and where any bends or curves are and what their orientations are. I can't emphasize how helpful this will be when you go to reassemble. Shop manual diagrams often donít cover everything you might need to know.
4) Now you can start disassembly - continue to take pictures. Sometimes it's helpful to know how you took it apart.
5) Label everything.
6) Clean everything. If you can lay out your parts on a floor in relative positions, your labels and parts will remain associated while you clean individual items.
7) Inspect all the parts for serviceability. Mechanical brakes are susceptible to worn shafts, inadvertent bends, excessive play in connections (clevis pins/holes, etc.) and such. If you canít find specs on how much wear/play to accept - ask Ford Barn. Someone out there should be able give you good information.
8) Replace all unserviceable parts. I'm not certain on the availability of mechanical brake parts for the big trucks as I havenít dabbled in the big ones. Conceptually, they arenít much different than the cars
9) Reassemble. One caveat - the truck may have had the brakes modified or erroneously reassembled in the past. If so, your pictures wonít tell you that. If parts donít look right or fit right (minus allowance given for adjustments), there may be a problem. Iíd seek advice from Ford Barn for this too.
10) Adjust and drive.

If I've forgotten anything, someone please speak up. Once adjusted correctly, mechanical brakes should provide years of dependable service - just remember, the stopping power is adequate, not great, with mechanical brakes.

Can I ask where you got your tires?

Looking forward to seeing some more progress pictures,

Dan
Dan, wow thanks so much! I hope in a few weeks I can get back on the project! I found the tires at summit racing website, nobody locally here could get them
farmboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2015, 07:41 AM   #107
Don Rogers
Senior Member
 
Don Rogers's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Wildwood, MO. (near St. Louis)
Posts: 1,300
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

Heres a blowup of the brake system from your truck taken from a 1936 Ford chassis list. I hope the resolution is OK.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Brakes.jpg (110.5 KB, 37 views)
Don Rogers is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2015, 10:45 AM   #108
Bob C
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: So Cal
Posts: 6,243
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

What size tires did you get?

Bob
Bob C is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2015, 03:35 PM   #109
4dy
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 46
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

Excellent advice, especially about often overlooked things like which direction things went (pins, arms, washers, etc). Repair manual pictures often lack the detail to show these subtle differences that could make a big difference when assembling. I have some plastic boxes with lids and individual partitions that I number. I write down each nut, bolt etc for each one so the same ones go back where they came assembled back in reverse order. That should eliminate trying to figure out where left over parts belong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by COE Dan View Post
The '36 trucks have mechanical brakes as you likely know already. Hereís one link to diagrams and a parts list for 35-37 truck brakes (there are likely others):

http://restoreyourford.com/1935tbrake.shtml

The advantage to mechanical brakes is they never leak and mechanical adjustment is all that's required. This means your parts may still be serviceable (as opposed to a hydraulic system that likely would have been destroyed by corrosion by now).

Hereís a 10-step guide for your brake rebuilding effort:

1) Donít dive right into disassembly.
2) Keeping everything fully assembled, clean as much crud off the parts as you can so you can see how everything connects.
3) Take pictures of everything fully assembled. Pay particular attention to where clevises connect, which side of the clevis pins the cotter pins are on (it may not matter in most cases but in some cases it may), which direction bell cranks are mounted, and where any bends or curves are and what their orientations are. I can't emphasize how helpful this will be when you go to reassemble. Shop manual diagrams often donít cover everything you might need to know.
4) Now you can start disassembly - continue to take pictures. Sometimes it's helpful to know how you took it apart.
5) Label everything.
6) Clean everything. If you can lay out your parts on a floor in relative positions, your labels and parts will remain associated while you clean individual items.
7) Inspect all the parts for serviceability. Mechanical brakes are susceptible to worn shafts, inadvertent bends, excessive play in connections (clevis pins/holes, etc.) and such. If you canít find specs on how much wear/play to accept - ask Ford Barn. Someone out there should be able give you good information.
8) Replace all unserviceable parts. I'm not certain on the availability of mechanical brake parts for the big trucks as I havenít dabbled in the big ones. Conceptually, they arenít much different than the cars
9) Reassemble. One caveat - the truck may have had the brakes modified or erroneously reassembled in the past. If so, your pictures wonít tell you that. If parts donít look right or fit right (minus allowance given for adjustments), there may be a problem. Iíd seek advice from Ford Barn for this too.
10) Adjust and drive.

If I've forgotten anything, someone please speak up. Once adjusted correctly, mechanical brakes should provide years of dependable service - just remember, the stopping power is adequate, not great, with mechanical brakes.

Can I ask where you got your tires?

Looking forward to seeing some more progress pictures,

Dan
4dy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2015, 07:37 PM   #110
farmboy
Senior Member
 
farmboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Rector, AR
Posts: 167
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob C View Post
What size tires did you get?

Bob
6.50 20s
farmboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2015, 07:38 PM   #111
farmboy
Senior Member
 
farmboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Rector, AR
Posts: 167
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

Wow you guys are awesome thanks so much for the info! You'll be hearing more from me when I have time to tackle this!
farmboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2015, 09:59 PM   #112
farmboy
Senior Member
 
farmboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Rector, AR
Posts: 167
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

Update:

Got parts coming in for the ole flathead! Most everything will be replaced except for the crank!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg image.jpg (54.4 KB, 91 views)
farmboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2015, 01:28 PM   #113
farmboy
Senior Member
 
farmboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Rector, AR
Posts: 167
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

Update:

The engine is almost rebuilt and should have that back next week! I have taken the bed off in the front fenders as the front fenders need a little bodywork the rest is really straight. I have sent the radiator off to a fellow in Fort Smith Arkansas they can either repair that one or build an exact replica it was in pretty bad shape. I have been working on the brakes as you have probably seen some of my post they seem to be working properly, and the brake shoes to me look to be good enough for now. I still have to free up the mechanism that runs all the tire rods behind the cab better thAn it is now and then get springs for that and I think the brakes will be set! I was in awe of how well they still work! I had a seal on the back axle that was leaking at the brakes were ho I had a seal on the back axle that was leaking at the brakes were oily on one side. I found a seal at job lot that should be here today once I get that fixed in the wheels put back on I'm going to roll out side and steam clean real good and get ready to San Blast the frame, I have gotten more done on this truck before winter then I expected which is a good thing !

The engine is pretty much going to be fully rebuilt except the crank was just turn down some more it's supposed to have newer style valves that are easier to adjust also the people that are doing it are very professional and said it will be better than new The engine is pretty much going to be fully rebuilt except the crank was just turn down some more it's supposed to have newer style valves that are easier to adjust also the people that are doing it are very professional and said it will be better than new, we will see. I am fixing to tackle the gas tank and see what I have to work with there, I believe a good cleaning out and maybe a sealant on the inside and will be good to go hopefully !

That's just an update for now I really appreciate all the help I have gotten on here you guys are awesome!
Bret
Attached Images
File Type: jpg image.jpg (100.0 KB, 128 views)
farmboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2015, 03:16 PM   #114
farmboy
Senior Member
 
farmboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Rector, AR
Posts: 167
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

Here's a little video update on where I'm at with the project. We got our crop harvested yesterday so about to have more time to work on it!

http://youtu.be/ycQoXRRpJGI
farmboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2015, 07:58 PM   #115
41panelmark
Senior Member
 
41panelmark's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,138
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

Exciting to see the progress, looking good.
41panelmark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2015, 08:02 AM   #116
farmboy
Senior Member
 
farmboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Rector, AR
Posts: 167
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

Cleaning her up getting ready to sandblast!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg image.jpg (58.7 KB, 78 views)
farmboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2015, 03:54 PM   #117
Steel 35
Senior Member
 
Steel 35's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Southern OR.
Posts: 222
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

Looks like you have all the patterns for the Glass you would need; I got a old class mate to do mine and got them very cheap with a light tint, but as well in your case POP didn't have them, but I wanted them. Keep having a ball
Steel 35 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2015, 10:14 PM   #118
farmboy
Senior Member
 
farmboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Rector, AR
Posts: 167
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

Here's another little video on where I'm at. Keeping all of these to put together a video of the entire process when done! Fixing spend a ton of time blasting and sanding. Taking my time, I'll have some extra time to work on it next few months.

http://youtu.be/EK1KJT_z3ac
farmboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2015, 11:23 PM   #119
Don Rogers
Senior Member
 
Don Rogers's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Wildwood, MO. (near St. Louis)
Posts: 1,300
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

Nice progress.....Make sure you keep the pinstripe detail on the wheels. That was indicative of a 36 Demo Truck.
Don Rogers is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2015, 01:45 AM   #120
Flowmeister
Senior Member
 
Flowmeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Calgary Alberta
Posts: 133
Default Re: Saving a family treasure...(1936 1and1/2 ton)

Nice!

Really enjoying this thread.
Flowmeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:59 PM.