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Old 12-18-2019, 10:51 PM   #1
Clem Clement
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Default Oil change process

I have not run my restored 40MEREC since mid July. She waits for a oil change which I am fully remiss in doing. I'm in cardio rehab so my tin waits. The oil is dark

do I start it her and warm up the setting oil before draining out the oil; or drain it static? I do not have a filter.
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Old 12-18-2019, 10:53 PM   #2
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Default Re: Oil change process

You always want to drain the oil warm as it decreases viscosity and drains out better.


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Old 12-19-2019, 04:18 AM   #3
51 MERC-CT
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Default Re: Oil change process

Since the car has not been run for a long period of time, the old crappy oil has drained into the oil pan.
Starting it to warm it up just pumps that oil that has managed to drain out of any lubricated parts back into the system.
In your case it really does'nt matter if it drains better or quicker.
Just drain it cold and let it do so for as long as it takes to stop dripping.
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Old 12-19-2019, 07:18 AM   #4
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Default Re: Oil change process

I understand the "garage floor" cardio experience. I drain it cold. As stated no need to wake up the sleeping crud. Take out the drain plug and let it drain overnight. Next day replace the filter and fil put in the new oil... Chap
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Old 12-19-2019, 09:56 AM   #5
Clem Clement
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Default Re: Oil change process

Thanks. In 6 months the big lumps should be at the bottom. When I gain strength I'll do it. Interestingly the restorer painted the big plug. I'll have to figure out how to release it without messing up the paint.
Merry Christmas
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Old 12-19-2019, 09:57 AM   #6
Tim Ayers
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Default Re: Oil change process

A few times, I've drained them cold and then refilled with the cheapest oil I can find. Run the cheap oil for a warm up cycle and then drain that warm.

Once the cheap oil is drained, I refill with good stuff. Seems to catch the left overs from the cold drain.

Just another approach on how to do it
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Old 12-19-2019, 10:00 AM   #7
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Default Re: Oil change process

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Ayers View Post
A few times, I've drained them cold and then refilled with the cheapest oil I can find. Run the cheap oil for a warm up cycle and then drain that warm.

Once the cheap oil is drained, I refill with good stuff. Seems to catch the left overs from the cold drain.

Just another approach on how to do it
Agree with Tim, this is the approach I would take.
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Old 12-19-2019, 10:03 AM   #8
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Default Re: Oil change process

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Originally Posted by Clem Clement View Post
Thanks. In 6 months the big lumps should be at the bottom. When I gain strength I'll do it. Interestingly the restorer painted the big plug. I'll have to figure out how to release it without messing up the paint.
Merry Christmas
I would use something like an Exacto knife to cut around where the plug meets the pan.
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Old 12-19-2019, 12:27 PM   #9
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Default Re: Oil change process

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clem Clement View Post
Thanks. In 6 months the big lumps should be at the bottom. When I gain strength I'll do it. Interestingly the restorer painted the big plug. I'll have to figure out how to release it without messing up the paint.
Merry Christmas
Put masking tape on two sides and use a BIG crescent wrench - not a pair of Channel Locks like most tend to use. Or, maybe a big-ass socket. I have a crescent wrench the size of God - works well for that big ole' plug. No idea as to why Henry had to make it that way . . .
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Old 12-19-2019, 01:05 PM   #10
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Default Re: Oil change process

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Ayers View Post
A few times, I've drained them cold and then refilled with the cheapest oil I can find. Run the cheap oil for a warm up cycle and then drain that warm.

Once the cheap oil is drained, I refill with good stuff. Seems to catch the left overs from the cold drain.

Just another approach on how to do it
Not to say this is wrong, I would do this if it was sitting for years without starting. For six months it's probably not really necessary. With that said, if mine is pretty dirty, I will drain the pan ,wait for it to stop dripping and pour a half quart of new oil in the filler to push any left old oil out.


If you are using synthetic or blend, it's not a good idea to flush with mineral type oil.
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Old 12-19-2019, 02:54 PM   #11
Tim Ayers
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Default Re: Oil change process

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Originally Posted by solidaxle View Post
Not to say this is wrong, I would do this if it was sitting for years without starting. For six months it's probably not really necessary. With that said, if mine is pretty dirty, I will drain the pan ,wait for it to stop dripping and pour a half quart of new oil in the filler to push any left old oil out.


If you are using synthetic or blend, it's not a good idea to flush with mineral type oil.
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Old 12-19-2019, 02:59 PM   #12
Seth Swoboda
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Default Re: Oil change process

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Originally Posted by Bored&Stroked View Post
Put masking tape on two sides and use a BIG crescent wrench - not a pair of Channel Locks like most tend to use. Or, maybe a big-ass socket. I have a crescent wrench the size of God - works well for that big ole' plug. No idea as to why Henry had to make it that way . . .
It was the precursor to speedy lube. Fast drain times.
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Old 12-19-2019, 03:24 PM   #13
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Default Re: Oil change process

Just changed the 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee cold. What I learned: Too may years of "old school", where you wind up with hot oil running down you hands and arms. Now on to the "cold oil change" for the 53' Merc and my wifes 70 Cougar. Thanks guys for the lesson learned.
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Old 12-19-2019, 03:34 PM   #14
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Default Re: Oil change process

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Ayers View Post
A few times, I've drained them cold and then refilled with the cheapest oil I can find. Run the cheap oil for a warm up cycle and then drain that warm.

Once the cheap oil is drained, I refill with good stuff. Seems to catch the left overs from the cold drain.
What he said. When you consider what it protects, oil is cheap.
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Old 12-19-2019, 04:17 PM   #15
51 MERC-CT
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Default Re: Oil change process

Speaking of a better way than crawling under the car to drain oil, this is a thread that I started about a year ago.-----


https://www.fordbarn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=253773
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Old 12-20-2019, 10:17 AM   #16
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Default Re: Oil change process

Does the idea of draining the warm old oil and then putting in a quart of kerosene
(without the engine running) help in draining out the old oil and sledge that may have accumulated?

Add fresh oil after kerosene has drained out. QUESTION: Will the residual kerosene harm the engine by doing this?
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Old 12-20-2019, 11:06 AM   #17
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Default Re: Oil change process

Old timers way back when would get hold of a customer's gummed up, neglected smoker. Drain the oil fill it with kero let it sit idling until the smoke quit (the rings now were free ) drain and fill with fresh oil. The neighbors loved it. NOT!

BTW Hydraulic Lifters ended such therapy.
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Last edited by A bones; 12-20-2019 at 11:15 AM. Reason: BTW
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Old 12-20-2019, 11:56 PM   #18
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Default Re: Oil change process

A few years ago in the early 50s when I was in High School I worked in a SERVICE STATION. Note service. Well we would flush engines. 1/2 oil and 1/2 kerosene and run the engine until good and warm. Drain the engine and put fresh oil in.
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Old 12-21-2019, 12:11 AM   #19
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Default Re: Oil change process

Quote:
Originally Posted by 19Fordy View Post
Does the idea of draining the warm old oil and then putting in a quart of kerosene
(without the engine running) help in draining out the old oil and sledge that may have accumulated?

Add fresh oil after kerosene has drained out. QUESTION: Will the residual kerosene harm the engine by doing this?


Likely won't do any good. The kerosene will just make a beeline for the drain opening and be gone. To do any good, it has to slosh around in the engine awhile. And while many engines have been flushed (supposedly) with kerosene or Diesel fuel and survived, I don't want my engine's oil diluted with a non-lubricant!
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Old 12-21-2019, 12:33 AM   #20
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Default Re: Oil change process

Clem I bet your fine just draining the oil and doing a oil change. Better then not doing a oil change. If you didn't know the engine, then a pan drop.


Don't worry!


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