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Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #1
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Default Wheels




I have several wheels and most of them have a little bit of a warp in them. Does any body have an Idea of how to get the wrap out. Or know any one that does that.They are to good to trash. Leon



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Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #2
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Default Wheel Straightening







<font size=4> Leon, I have commented on this many times before and it basically boils down to unless you or a buddy can true them up for free, or next to nearly free, then they are indeed "trash".



I true wheels and have the jig to do it but the set-up time, and the correct process that must be done is something that takes time ...and time is money. It is not uncommon to spend 2-3 hours completely truing up a wheel. By the time you factor in labor, then it is not worth what most people will give.



Many will tell you that they have used a press that will straighten the wheel in a few short minutes. The problem is that this method is just like putting sawdust in a noisy transmission. It works for a short time and then the metal's memory takes over again. When dealing with metal, there are two basic fundamental elements that take place. You either shrink it or stretch it. When a spoke is bent, it almost always is stretched. The spokes were designed to be under tension thus when the spoke or rim is bent, the tension is released. Putting the wheel in a press and pushing the rim back into the former shape does not shrink the stretched spoke back into tension. Thus, the only way to truly true a wheel is to use a shrinking method --and the torch with a flame is the most common method. This involves placing the wheel on a jig to indicate where the troubled areas are, and then systematically start shrinking the wheel's spokes. Where this get's even more tense is that for every action there is a reaction somewhere else on the rim. In other words, shrinking in one area usually pulls it in another area.



I hope I have given you some insight. Your wheels may indeed be worth saving but you almost must do it yourself to do it economically.







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Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #3
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Default Re: Wheel Straightening







Brent wouldn't he be better off buying new wheels from Snyders or the like? Nothing like new unpitted metal, however I haven't seen the new ones yet to judge. You're right labor eats up the difference real fast.



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Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #4
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Default Re: Wheel Straightening









The original wheels weren't all that straight when they were new.



Almost any straightening would be better than nothing if a wheel severely wobbled.



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Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #5
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Default New Wheels







A guy in our club bought 6 new wheels for his 29. He said they sure ride nice, and are very true. The spoke where it meets the rim isn't flared like the original. Instead, the rim has a little bump torwards the center, where it meets the spoke. Had they taken care of this one detail, the new wheels would be almost impossible to tell from originals.



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Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #6
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Default Re: Wheel Straightening







Well said Brent, I was one of the people that thought that all that was needed was a press. I do believe the proper way to do it is as you say. I sure would like to know more about metal stretching and shrinking as it is an interesting subject for me. It would scare me a little to try it myself. There must be a lot of trial and error in getting the skill. Thanks for the info. Dale



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Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #7
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Default Repo New Wheels







Saw the Snyder wheels at Chickasha. Typical repo part. The spokes are not welded at the inside of the rim and look horrible. They go to all the trouble of producing a part, but don't do the detail work to make the thing right. They would sell a lot more if they were correct.



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Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #8
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Default Wheel Straightening







<font size=4> Leon, I have commented on this many times before and it basically boils down to unless you or a buddy can true them up for free, or next to nearly free, then they are indeed "trash".



I true wheels and have the jig to do it but the set-up time, and the correct process that must be done is something that takes time ...and time is money. It is not uncommon to spend 2-3 hours completely truing up a wheel. By the time you factor in labor, then it is not worth what most people will give.



Many will tell you that they have used a press that will straighten the wheel in a few short minutes. The problem is that this method is just like putting sawdust in a noisy transmission. It works for a short time and then the metal's memory takes over again. When dealing with metal, there are two basic fundamental elements that take place. You either shrink it or stretch it. When a spoke is bent, it almost always is stretched. The spokes were designed to be under tension thus when the spoke or rim is bent, the tension is released. Putting the wheel in a press and pushing the rim back into the former shape does not shrink the stretched spoke back into tension. Thus, the only way to truly true a wheel is to use a shrinking method --and the torch with a flame is the most common method. This involves placing the wheel on a jig to indicate where the troubled areas are, and then systematically start shrinking the wheel's spokes. Where this get's even more tense is that for every action there is a reaction somewhere else on the rim. In other words, shrinking in one area usually pulls it in another area.



I hope I have given you some insight. Your wheels may indeed be worth saving but you almost must do it yourself to do it economically.







<table><tr><td><font face="arial">
<ul>[*]MY WEBSITE[/list]

 
Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #9
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Default Re: Wheel Straightening







Brent wouldn't he be better off buying new wheels from Snyders or the like? Nothing like new unpitted metal, however I haven't seen the new ones yet to judge. You're right labor eats up the difference real fast.



<table><tr><td><font face="arial">


 
Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #10
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Default Re: Wheel Straightening









The original wheels weren't all that straight when they were new.



Almost any straightening would be better than nothing if a wheel severely wobbled.



<table><tr><td><font face="arial">


 
Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #11
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Default New Wheels







A guy in our club bought 6 new wheels for his 29. He said they sure ride nice, and are very true. The spoke where it meets the rim isn't flared like the original. Instead, the rim has a little bump torwards the center, where it meets the spoke. Had they taken care of this one detail, the new wheels would be almost impossible to tell from originals.



<table><tr><td><font face="arial">


 
Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #12
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Default Re: Wheel Straightening







Well said Brent, I was one of the people that thought that all that was needed was a press. I do believe the proper way to do it is as you say. I sure would like to know more about metal stretching and shrinking as it is an interesting subject for me. It would scare me a little to try it myself. There must be a lot of trial and error in getting the skill. Thanks for the info. Dale



<table><tr><td><font face="arial">


 
Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #13
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Repo New Wheels







Saw the Snyder wheels at Chickasha. Typical repo part. The spokes are not welded at the inside of the rim and look horrible. They go to all the trouble of producing a part, but don't do the detail work to make the thing right. They would sell a lot more if they were correct.



<table><tr><td><font face="arial">


 
Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #14
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Posts: n/a
Default Wheel Straightening







<font size=4> Leon, I have commented on this many times before and it basically boils down to unless you or a buddy can true them up for free, or next to nearly free, then they are indeed "trash".



I true wheels and have the jig to do it but the set-up time, and the correct process that must be done is something that takes time ...and time is money. It is not uncommon to spend 2-3 hours completely truing up a wheel. By the time you factor in labor, then it is not worth what most people will give.



Many will tell you that they have used a press that will straighten the wheel in a few short minutes. The problem is that this method is just like putting sawdust in a noisy transmission. It works for a short time and then the metal's memory takes over again. When dealing with metal, there are two basic fundamental elements that take place. You either shrink it or stretch it. When a spoke is bent, it almost always is stretched. The spokes were designed to be under tension thus when the spoke or rim is bent, the tension is released. Putting the wheel in a press and pushing the rim back into the former shape does not shrink the stretched spoke back into tension. Thus, the only way to truly true a wheel is to use a shrinking method --and the torch with a flame is the most common method. This involves placing the wheel on a jig to indicate where the troubled areas are, and then systematically start shrinking the wheel's spokes. Where this get's even more tense is that for every action there is a reaction somewhere else on the rim. In other words, shrinking in one area usually pulls it in another area.



I hope I have given you some insight. Your wheels may indeed be worth saving but you almost must do it yourself to do it economically.







<table><tr><td><font face="arial">
<ul>[*]MY WEBSITE[/list]

 
Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #15
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Wheel Straightening







Brent wouldn't he be better off buying new wheels from Snyders or the like? Nothing like new unpitted metal, however I haven't seen the new ones yet to judge. You're right labor eats up the difference real fast.



<table><tr><td><font face="arial">


 
Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #16
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Wheel Straightening









The original wheels weren't all that straight when they were new.



Almost any straightening would be better than nothing if a wheel severely wobbled.



<table><tr><td><font face="arial">


 
Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #17
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default New Wheels







A guy in our club bought 6 new wheels for his 29. He said they sure ride nice, and are very true. The spoke where it meets the rim isn't flared like the original. Instead, the rim has a little bump torwards the center, where it meets the spoke. Had they taken care of this one detail, the new wheels would be almost impossible to tell from originals.



<table><tr><td><font face="arial">


 
Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #18
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Wheel Straightening







Well said Brent, I was one of the people that thought that all that was needed was a press. I do believe the proper way to do it is as you say. I sure would like to know more about metal stretching and shrinking as it is an interesting subject for me. It would scare me a little to try it myself. There must be a lot of trial and error in getting the skill. Thanks for the info. Dale



<table><tr><td><font face="arial">


 
Old 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM   #19
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Repo New Wheels







Saw the Snyder wheels at Chickasha. Typical repo part. The spokes are not welded at the inside of the rim and look horrible. They go to all the trouble of producing a part, but don't do the detail work to make the thing right. They would sell a lot more if they were correct.



<table><tr><td><font face="arial">


 
 

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