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Old 03-15-2012, 11:29 AM   #61
Cool Hand Lurker
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Default Re: Farmer fixes


This brings out a lot of questions, like:

Is a "rough service" bulb necessary?
Do you need a carburetor fuse?
If the bulb burns out will it cut off the gas flow?
If the bulb is too big should you add a resistor?
Does the bulb make the gas lighter for better combustion?
With a round bulb, how do you know which side should be up?
Would an LED work just as well?
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Old 03-15-2012, 12:21 PM   #62
Roadster Rich
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Default Re: Farmer fixes

I saw the message about my comment on a Model A engine in a 9N tractor and I knew I wasn't that old to be so wrong. I guess the 9N memory was wrong, but I know I drove the tractor for long enough with an old sickle bar to mow.

Here is a link that I got from a forum on old tractors that shows one.

http://www.ytmag.com/cgi-bin/viewit....oard&th=762775
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Old 03-15-2012, 11:48 PM   #63
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Default Re: Farmer fixes

Wow! Unreal! Hard to imagine that there'd be more than one of these in existence. Why someone would go to all the trouble of converting a Ferguson over to Model A power? Especially since this would have been done sometime in the '50's or even '60's. The oldest this Ferguson could be would be a 1947 TE-20; more likely a later T0-20 or TO-30.
Sure would be neat to know the history! Did someone make adapter kits, or was it all hand fabricated? The gas tank mount, throttle linkage, etc. looks pretty cobbled; definitely not factory.
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Old 03-16-2012, 01:51 AM   #64
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Default Re: Farmer fixes

The front mount for the front axle does not look substantial enough to handle the forces applied to it during normal tractor duties. Perhaps the OHV Ferguson engine was too expensive to rebuild? And the Model A engine was started with a crank?
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Old 03-16-2012, 03:43 AM   #65
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Default Re: Farmer fixes

The Ferguson I used to plow and cut hay with as a boy could be hand cranked..... here is a current picture.
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Old 03-16-2012, 07:35 PM   #66
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Default Re: Farmer fixes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadster Rich View Post
I saw the message about my comment on a Model A engine in a 9N tractor and I knew I wasn't that old to be so wrong. I guess the 9N memory was wrong, but I know I drove the tractor for long enough with an old sickle bar to mow.

Here is a link that I got from a forum on old tractors that shows one.

http://www.ytmag.com/cgi-bin/viewit....oard&th=762775
I WANT THE "CRUISE CONTROL" mounted on the front connected to the carb! Are governors for the industrial Model A motors available? I think it would be a neat accessory for driving on the interstate!
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Old 03-17-2012, 03:59 AM   #67
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Regarding the comment about the expense of overhauling the Ferguson engine: I remember going with my dad to a Tractor Supply store in 1954 or '55 where he bought an overhaul kit for our TE-20 Ferguson. It had pistons, rings, sleeves, main and rod bearings, valves, valve guides and gaskets. Cost was $50!
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Old 03-18-2012, 04:23 AM   #68
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Originally Posted by 40 Deluxe View Post
Regarding the comment about the expense of overhauling the Ferguson engine: I remember going with my dad to a Tractor Supply store in 1954 or '55 where he bought an overhaul kit for our TE-20 Ferguson. It had pistons, rings, sleeves, main and rod bearings, valves, valve guides and gaskets. Cost was $50!
Yep, and that's what made them the "good old days". In the mid 60's my boss at the service station bought a 1953 Chevy dump truck and changed it to a wrecker. He bought the rering kit from Wards for under $10. This included the rod bearings, piston rings, and gaskets. I liked it when Sears and Wards had an antique car section in their catalogs.
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Old 03-18-2012, 06:23 AM   #69
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Default Re: Farmer fixes

Me too Tom, the tires on my model A are Allstate/Sears. They are still in decent shape except for some minor cracking. They state their size as 4.50/4.75/5.00/5.25/5.50-19". One size fits all!
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Old 03-18-2012, 06:35 AM   #70
Barry B./ Ma.
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Default Re: Farmer fixes

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Originally Posted by ctlikon0712 View Post
The Ferguson I used to plow and cut hay with as a boy could be hand cranked..... here is a current picture.
Wow, nice one! What's it doing just sitting there collecting junk?
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Old 03-20-2012, 07:17 PM   #71
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Default Re: Farmer fixes

Looks like a house light switch was used here

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Old 03-03-2013, 04:43 PM   #72
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anymore?
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Old 03-03-2013, 05:38 PM   #73
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Default Re: Farmer fixes

Battery box. Easy to get to.
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Old 03-03-2013, 08:38 PM   #74
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Default Re: Farmer fixes

As for the question on the type of "weld on the head"---99% of welds, in fact, any weld that held on cast iron, was bronze, put on by hand with a torch. Torch welding, even steel welding on things like fenders, was used a whole lot back in the days. It had a lot of worpage on the thin goodies but the repair was always more important than the looks years ago! I'm near 80yrs now and still use bronze some---it's a good weld!
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Old 03-03-2013, 11:37 PM   #75
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From the rust on the welds on the head,it looks to me that it was gas welded with cast iron rod rather than brazed
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Old 03-04-2013, 01:12 AM   #76
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Default Re: Farmer fixes

Just an old truck in the woods but does anybody recognize the contraption welded to the upper cab corner?
There's a pulley sandwiched inside the rusty straps.
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Old 03-04-2013, 09:22 AM   #77
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Default Re: Farmer fixes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry B./ Ma. View Post
Wow, nice one! What's it doing just sitting there collecting junk?
amen on that Ferguson- air up the tires and get it running again!

I'd love to have one of the old AC tractors I drove as a boy but they're long gone.
the Model C was sold in the 70s and the WC in '85. so far unable to track them down.
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Old 03-04-2013, 09:46 AM   #78
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MALAK,
In a point of Model A and/or WWII history, those pickup beds were actually in some cases commercially available. People would install a pickup bed in their car in order to obtain a commercial rating in order to obtain more ration stamps for fuel etc.
I have seen these on more cars than Model A's.
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Old 03-05-2013, 11:08 AM   #79
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Default Re: Farmer fixes

Quote:
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Just an old truck in the woods but does anybody recognize the contraption welded to the upper cab corner?
There's a pulley sandwiched inside the rusty straps.
From what I have seen on many old trucks, a turn signal arm was mounted to the outside of the truck. A pull cable was hand pulled by an inside lever activating the outside turn signal arm. Our 1930 AA truck still has a signal arm mounted on it with the cable pull hardware still working.
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:34 PM   #80
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Originally Posted by SSsssteamer View Post
From what I have seen on many old trucks, a turn signal arm was mounted to the outside of the truck. A pull cable was hand pulled by an inside lever activating the outside turn signal arm. Our 1930 AA truck still has a signal arm mounted on it with the cable pull hardware still working.
That would make a neat antique car accessory, an arm that flips up and is lined with flashing LED's on both sides of the arm, and one for each side of the car.

It could mount to the door hinge and flip up by use of a small solenoid.

OK, who was looking for a retirement project?
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