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Old 12-08-2018, 11:10 AM   #21
tubman
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Default Re: Tig Welding

I have a mild case of Atrial Fibrillation that I didn't even know I had until my doctor diagnosed it about 25 years ago. It is being treated with blood thinners, but that's it. My doctor warned me about welding, and even told me to stay away from the magneto on my race car. I did replace the mag with a Mallory flattop (I only run exhibitions anyway), but have generally ignored his advice about welding (I only do Stick and MIG), as I thought his concerns were overblown. I have never had a problem. (Now watch what happens!)
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Old 12-08-2018, 11:10 AM   #22
34PKUP
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Default Re: Tig Welding

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Originally Posted by rotorwrench View Post
Chain mail would be a better shield than solid armor. Shielded wires are used a lot in aviation to protect communications systems from outside "noise interference" or EMF. The shielding wire mesh is tied to ground on both ends of the wire. Reciprocating engines have shielded high tension leads where she shield is grounded on both ends. The P-leads are also shielded between the ignition switch and the mags as well as the retard starting vibrators. All this stuff is to allow the NAV/COM radios and NAV devices to function normally.


There may be a way to fabricate a shielded outer wear that would be effective but it would have to be studied and tested to find out what the best combination of materials would be. It would likely be a metal wire woven cloth that could be grounded in a manner that might be effective. The government has done and is still doing a lot of research on EMF shielding due to the possibility of atomic devices or special EMF generating equipment being used as weapons.
Seems to me that the shielding used in aviation and other applications is not because it shields any better than something solid, but because it is flexible and is better suited for the application.
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Old 12-08-2018, 01:12 PM   #23
Flathead Fever
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Default Re: Tig Welding

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Originally Posted by Frank Miller View Post
I'm thinking, why couldn't they make a shielded vest that would absorb stray EMF?
That was what I thought too. But I read last night that there is no device manufactured that you can put on to block the EMF. That doesn't mean one can't be invented.
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Old 12-08-2018, 01:29 PM   #24
Flathead Fever
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Default Re: Tig Welding

Here is a website on welding EMF. They have developed a computer program that generates a report telling you your EMF exposure. The report comes from a separate website that requires a payment to get the report. It might be worth it to

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSPjV3PKXKk


There are lots of YouTube, EMF measuring videos.

You might try just buying a meter and measuring it yourself. I checked eBay and there are all kinds of EMF meters, dirt cheap. Then you could contact the manufacturer with some real data.
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Old 12-08-2018, 09:07 PM   #25
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Default Re: Tig Welding

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Originally Posted by Kahuna View Post
I say: WHY take the chance?

I agree here. You have someone that want's to learn about cars and can weld? Take care and be careful!
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Old 12-08-2018, 11:47 PM   #26
TomT/Williamsburg
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Default Re: Tig Welding

Gary, I as well as many others here on this board, the HAMB, and many other car nuts have bought your products. I am sure none of us would want you to risk your health to do so. You all ready have a certified welder doing the heavy welding - let them do it all. You are not throwing in the towel - it's just good business - and your health, your knowledge, and your contributions to the hobby are more important. I met you in '13 at Bonneville with the Rolling Bones and I enjoyed your company - stay safe my friend.
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Old 12-11-2018, 11:04 AM   #27
barnfind
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Default Re: Tig Welding

Here's an interesting discussion and ideas on the Miller Forum:
https://forum.millerwelds.com/forum/...ency-questions

I got my first TIG setup a few months ago and the MFG manual warns about keeping
the power source line as short as possible along with several suggestions and warnings for reducing EMF exposure.

Found this web site discussing various EMF sources and meters.
https://www.emfanalysis.com/emf-meters/

Amazon has EMF absorbing fabric if you want to make a protective shirt or jacket or ??
Search for "Unfinished Silver Fabric for Earth Connection/Grounding"

If it were me, I would find a local tech school and get some free labor in exchange for some old ford and fabricating knowledge.
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Old 12-11-2018, 11:21 AM   #28
19Fordy
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Default Re: Tig Welding

Tom/T nailed it. Don't play EMF roulette?
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Old 06-10-2019, 05:47 PM   #29
Krylon32
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Default Re: Tig Welding

Update: Just finished the fab work on a customer 33/34 chassis. Used my tig to do it all, even used filler rod where needed. It takes a bit longer to get the metal to flow at 160 amps, but no ill effects so far. Now my finish welder can do his thing.
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Old 06-10-2019, 06:22 PM   #30
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Default Re: Tig Welding

Good to hear!
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Old 06-10-2019, 07:10 PM   #31
Bored&Stroked
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Default Re: Tig Welding

All I know is that my butt would be puckering the first time I stepped down on my Miller pedal! I give you credit . . . and I imagine you started at low amps and worked your way up. Best of luck Gary - you are a credit to our world and we all want you around to be a part of it. Take care,

B&S
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Old 06-10-2019, 07:12 PM   #32
Ggmac
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Default Re: Tig Welding

I'm wondering if a resistance spot welder is ok ? The magnetic field it creates is darn strong .
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Old 06-11-2019, 07:15 AM   #33
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Default Re: Tig Welding

I had an old Linde 500 amp Constant Current/Constant Voltage welder with all the bells and whistles (at the time). adjustable high-freq, water cooled torch, pre/post flow timers etc etc.
When I would light that baby off it would shut down the signal on the neighbor's [for 1/2 a block] teevee and radio.

Granted the newer equipment is much more sophisticated but I don't think I would risk it.
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