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Old 02-28-2016, 02:18 AM   #1
bluedog
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Default Timing Question

I attempted to do the timing on my 1930 tourer today according to the Les Andrews method. After numerous attempts I could not get the points indicator light to come on until about 5 stops down on the spark advance lever. I observed that when the spark advance is moved nothing happens at the distributor until about 3 stops down due to free play in the linkages. Due to this and control rod length issues I am also a fair way off getting full advance
Being RHD new or reproduction control rods are hard to come by in the correct length.
Does anyone have any suggestions to reduce the freeplay, or sources of adjustable control rods? The socket end of each control rod is bigger than the ball joints.

Greg
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Old 02-28-2016, 02:31 AM   #2
Mike V. Florida
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Default Re: Timing Question

Yea your going to need to get rid of that play. Here in the states vendors sell a "Spark Control Rod Adjustable Sleeve"
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Old 02-28-2016, 11:16 AM   #3
Tom Wesenberg
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Default Re: Timing Question

Are the balls too worn, or are the ends of the links too large?
You can always cut and weld linkages, or make an adjustable sleeve for the cut links.
I'm not familure with the RHD, but if you have a bellcrank and the pivot hole has slop, then that needs to be welded and drilled, or install a bushing to remove the slop.
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Old 03-01-2016, 12:55 AM   #4
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Default Re: Timing Question

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Originally Posted by Tom Wesenberg View Post
Are the balls too worn, or are the ends of the links too large?
You can always cut and weld linkages, or make an adjustable sleeve for the cut links.
I'm not familure with the RHD, but if you have a bellcrank and the pivot hole has slop, then that needs to be welded and drilled, or install a bushing to remove the slop.
Probably a bit of both. One rod is an after market adjustable one and has some slop. I have ordered a new set of rods and will see how that goes.
If the balls are worn what is the best way to fix them?

Greg

Last edited by bluedog; 03-01-2016 at 05:50 AM. Reason: Typo
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Old 03-01-2016, 02:33 AM   #5
Tom Wesenberg
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Default Re: Timing Question

I've never had to build them up, but a bit of brazing would probably be the easiest fix.
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Old 03-01-2016, 08:50 AM   #6
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Default Re: Timing Question

I read somewhere, that if you use Les' timing instructions, you'll be OFF, BY ABOUT 5 degrees??
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Old 03-01-2016, 09:10 AM   #7
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Default Re: Timing Question

A lot of people run their car with the spark down just half way. If you car has a nice cackle with the spark up, and has good power with it down fully, you may be ok by just leaving things alone. Your full down position should be close to half way down on a system with little slop.
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Old 03-01-2016, 09:40 AM   #8
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Default Re: Timing Question

Farmer Fix: Move the spark retard lever down to those 2-3 clicks and then re-time it again using the same method. This should compensate for that wear you are experiencing with the worn linkage and disti gear. So when you want to be at full retard just move the lever all the way up. This was common back in the day.....
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Old 03-01-2016, 04:57 PM   #9
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Default Re: Timing Question

Again the old mention of the NuRex timing tool may be a help here. In using this tool, it gets things close and once that is done, then you can use the other methods people always mention to "High" tune it or it may be right on. BTW all the vendors sell this tool.
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Old 03-01-2016, 05:23 PM   #10
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Default Re: Timing Question

I attribute my need for 15 degrees adjustment to worn out everything. Les's method got me close. I straightened my rod also. It was bent to clear a horn mount. Moved that out of the way.
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Old 03-01-2016, 05:24 PM   #11
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Default Re: Timing Question

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Originally Posted by Fred K-OR View Post
Again the old mention of the NuRex timing tool may be a help here. In using this tool, it gets things close and once that is done, then you can use the other methods people always mention to "High" tune it or it may be right on. BTW all the vendors sell this tool.
It was certainly handy to have one of the NuRex timing tools along last summer when one of the guys in our group had to change out his distributor for some reason or another. Several of the guys fiddled with it for half an hour and never did get it timed so that it would run correctly (or even start). I finally took the situation in hand, and with the help of the NuRex tool, he was on his way in less than 5 minutes.
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Old 03-01-2016, 08:58 PM   #12
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Default Re: Timing Question

After you've experienced Model A's for quite awhile, if it starts & runs, you can fine tune the TIMING by EAR!
I've tiped the procedure, many times! Find it on "search" as I'm too TUCKERED out to tipe it agin!
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Old 03-04-2016, 11:15 PM   #13
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Default Re: Timing Question

What I did was slightly bend the control rod so that you have full contact with the far side of the notch in the distributer housing when the lever is all the way up and when all the way down you should have contact at the closest side of the notch. Do this before you time your spark. Other wise you have to rotate your steering column to make the correction.
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Old 03-05-2016, 12:27 PM   #14
Fred K-OR
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Default Re: Timing Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlG View Post
It was certainly handy to have one of the NuRex timing tools along last summer when one of the guys in our group had to change out his distributor for some reason or another. Several of the guys fiddled with it for half an hour and never did get it timed so that it would run correctly (or even start). I finally took the situation in hand, and with the help of the NuRex tool, he was on his way in less than 5 minutes.
The NuRex is a good investment even though it may not be the "best" way to time your rig.

After I rebuilt my distributor, after putting it in my coupe, I timed it the way that many of you have used for years. It started and ran great. Then I checked it with the NuRex and was able to see exactly where the wrench should show on the 4th plug stud. So in the future when using the NuRex, I will know exactly where to set it to get the best timing. In the past when I used the NuRex, I did not know exactly when to stop it on the 4th plug stud. It does make a difference going a fraction of a revolution plus or minus when turning the cam and lining up with the 4th stud.

Anyway that has been my experience with the NuRex. It is worthwhile it to have it in your tool box to use when needed as CarlG pointed out or anytime you want to time doing it the "lazy" way.
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