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Old 11-08-2013, 05:05 PM   #1
V12Bill
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Default Flooding carb

I have been having problems with my 91A - 99 carb flooding. I checked the fuel pressure from the pump and got 4# of pressure which is too much, so I cut a coil from the fuel pump spring and now have 3 1/4 # of pressure. The carb still floods at idle. I had the carb off and apart and cleaned every passageway and blew them out. I did remove a strange piece of debris in the needle valve area. The needle valve is of the blunt end variety and not the pointed type. The end toward the seat has some type of material on it to aid in getting a good seal.. I am leaning toward replaceing the needle and seat with the pointed type valve. Is 3 1/4 # too much? The float is set at 1.355.

Would appreciate any advice on this problem.
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Old 11-08-2013, 05:16 PM   #2
Mark Slight
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Default Re: Flooding carb

I hope others chime in on this, I thought 2lb. was correct.

Mark
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Old 11-08-2013, 05:33 PM   #3
trainguy
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Default Re: Flooding carb

From your description it sounds like you have a neoprene float valve.From what I read they do not work well with the alcohol gas.I would replace it with the all metal valve. phil
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Old 11-08-2013, 06:28 PM   #4
Terry,OH
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Default Re: Flooding carb

You can drop the pressure to 2 to 2 1/2# (make sure your gauge is not giving incorrect readings) and replace the Vitron tipped valve for a steel one, like Ford used. The Vitron tip usually winds up sticking closed.
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Old 11-10-2013, 10:21 AM   #5
Rich Overton
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Default Re: Flooding carb

I know this has been discussed over and over but I will add my two cents only as some information from my experience. I had replaced the carb four times on my Merc. only to find out that the flooding when hot and during hot weather ( above 80 deg.) was due to the ethanol. Also Ken Ct. informed me that he only uses needles without neoprene seats etc. as the ethanol "eats" all of the rubber components up within the fuel system. In fact, I used to find fine black powdery substances in my fuel bowls. I did, however start using a higher octane ( above 89) gas about every third tank full as suggested by another member. That seemed to help. ? ? ? Just food for thought. Yes, I went through all of the exercises, fuel pressure regulators, filters, Dick Spadaro insulator under the carb between the carb base and intake manifold etc. The insulator helped but upon initial start up from cold, caused ice crystals to form in the carb throat until she warmed up. Until she warmed up I'd get an occasional pulp, pulp, pulp while idling. I'd rather live with that than the flooding all over the engine. Just a little more food for thought.

Rich O.
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Old 11-10-2013, 04:21 PM   #6
Pete
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Default Re: Flooding carb

Quote:
Originally Posted by V12Bill View Post
I have been having problems with my 91A - 99 carb flooding. I checked the fuel pressure from the pump and got 4# of pressure which is too much, so I cut a coil from the fuel pump spring and now have 3 1/4 # of pressure. The carb still floods at idle. I had the carb off and apart and cleaned every passageway and blew them out. I did remove a strange piece of debris in the needle valve area. The needle valve is of the blunt end variety and not the pointed type. The end toward the seat has some type of material on it to aid in getting a good seal.. I am leaning toward replaceing the needle and seat with the pointed type valve. Is 3 1/4 # too much? The float is set at 1.355.

Would appreciate any advice on this problem.
Go here and read about these.
They will stand 9 lb of pressure and flow 10% more than stock valves.

http://strombergcarburetor.com/float.php

Last edited by Pete; 11-10-2013 at 04:35 PM.
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Old 11-10-2013, 04:41 PM   #7
woodypecker
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Default Re: Flooding carb

If you are using a mechanical pump add one or two gaskets under the pump stand. They will reduce travel and if you ever need higher pressure in the future take them out.
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Old 11-10-2013, 05:46 PM   #8
V12Bill
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Default Re: Flooding carb

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Originally Posted by Pete View Post
Go here and read about these.
They will stand 9 lb of pressure and flow 10% more than stock valves.

http://strombergcarburetor.com/float.php
This blunt needle valve appears to be the same as the one that I took out and replaced with a pointed needle valve. By the way the carb floated more with the pointed needle valve than with the blunt one.
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Old 11-10-2013, 06:59 PM   #9
OLD...BILL
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Default Re: Flooding carb

sounds like the seat itself is bad, or atleast it leaks, and it is replaceable, and where are your inline filters?? sounds like yous pumping trash,that can and will wear on the neddle and the seat ?? back on the farm I would be told to round over a small wood dowl and some lapping compound, chuck it in the drill press, and polish a new seat inside ?? yes your now laughing, hey its a trip top town,,, I'll read again the posting Pete put up its a good one, wonder how much, is it worth a " TRIP TO TOWN??? ....OLD....BILL
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Old 11-10-2013, 07:04 PM   #10
40 Deluxe
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Default Re: Flooding carb

Another good reason to search out ethanol-free fuel or make your own by removing the ethanol, in spite of what the ethanol lovers say.
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Old 11-10-2013, 07:20 PM   #11
billwill
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Default Re: Flooding carb

Your fuel pressure should be 2 lb
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Old 11-10-2013, 09:06 PM   #12
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Default Re: Flooding carb

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Originally Posted by 40 deluxe View Post
another good reason to search out ethanol-free fuel or make your own by removing the ethanol, in spite of what the ethanol lovers say.
how do you remove the ethanol?
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Old 11-11-2013, 01:39 AM   #13
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Default Re: Flooding carb

woodypecker, It's based on the fact that water and gasoline do not mix, while water and ethanol (alcohol) mix easily and stay mixed. What you do is get a clear container (like the five gallon jugs motorcycle guys often use). Fill it 1/4 full of water and 3/4 gasoline. Shake it up good and let sit for a few hours or longer. Since water is heavier than gasoline and does not mix with gasoline, it will settle to the bottom of the jug. Since the ethanol combined with the water when we shook the jug, it goes to the bottom with the water, leaving pure gasoline on top of the water. Next you siphon the pure gas into another container and add to your car, mower, chainsaw, etc. Or you can get fancy and add a spigot to the bottom of the jug to drain off the water/ethanol slurry.
One point to remember; refineries use a low octane gasoline to blend with ethanol and count on the higher octane of the ethanol to bring the final product up to 87 or whatever octane. If you want to end up with 87 octane pure gasoline, you have to buy 91 or 92 octane premium gasohol and remove the ethanol.
Interestingly, ethanol is not added to the gasoline until the gasoline arrives at the tank terminals where the tankers pick it up to deliver to your local station. Ethanol cannot be sent through pipelines because it will absorb the water that is in all pipelines to some extent. So any gasoline you buy has already been exposed to water before you add some water to remove the ethanol.
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