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Old 12-17-2015, 07:23 PM   #1
Prawbly
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Unhappy removing studs

HI all Well in preparing for my new Offenhauser 400 heads I of course broke a stud when trying to remove it. Not being an expert in this I was expecting problems, but now right off the bat. I think I know how to drill out the broken one and re-tap, but it's the others that have me worried. I know about using heat, but other than that are there other things besides heat, or a machine shop I could use ? Also, I need an intake valve for a 59ab !! Anyone has one I would like to buy it Thanks
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Old 12-17-2015, 07:29 PM   #2
mrtexas
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Default Re: removing studs

Don't drill out. Weld a washer onto the stud then weld a nut on the washer. Heat and quench. It will come right out.

Before you try to pull anymore, heat and quench a couple times first.
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Old 12-17-2015, 07:39 PM   #3
Prawbly
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Default Re: removing studs

Thank you. Sounds as though it will be a couple of days work. Merry Christmas to you and all of yours. Pat
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Old 12-17-2015, 08:41 PM   #4
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Default Re: removing studs

Real easy I have done 100's of broken studs of all sizes.

http://www.fordgarage.com/pages/studremoval.htm

R
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Old 12-17-2015, 10:15 PM   #5
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Default Re: removing studs

What a great article !! Thanks Ronnie it was great. I will try it out exactly like that and see what happens. I was losing confidence pretty fast. Thinking of removing 48 stubborn studs is a depressing thought. Thank you very much for taking time. I saved it for future use. - - Pat
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Old 12-17-2015, 10:58 PM   #6
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Default Re: removing studs

Another note, it is not a good idea to use a tap in the block cylinder holes. These holes are on the tight side (as designed) and should not have the threads increased to a looser fit. If they need cleaned out use something like a thread chaser or a bolt with a groove cut into it, something that will not cut the threads larger.
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Old 12-17-2015, 11:34 PM   #7
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Default Re: removing studs

Quote:
Originally Posted by JSeery View Post
Another note, it is not a good idea to use a tap in the block cylinder holes. These holes are on the tight side (as designed) and should not have the threads increased to a looser fit. If they need cleaned out use something like a thread chaser or a bolt with a groove cut into it, something that will not cut the threads larger.
jseery - thanks for your input. That is very good to know. All's I have to do now is get the rest of my studs out in one piece. LoL 47 studs !!! That's a lot of studs. Thanks and Merry Christmas. Pat
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Old 12-18-2015, 04:55 AM   #8
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Default Re: removing studs

I used another original stud with a slot cut in it with a cut off disc. The original studs have a rolled thread. If that is what you are putting back, then they should be a good fit.
I just put a bit of engine oil on the stud and kept cleaning out the groove.
All 48 are cleaned out and I am happy with them.
Running a tap in them will likely cut out new material leaving the threads with excessive clearance and the likelyhood of a leak. A mistake to avoid.

Rumble seat covered it in his notes. I understand he died quite some years back, but my thanks go out to him for sharing his knowledge with us.
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Old 12-18-2015, 09:05 AM   #9
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Default Re: removing studs

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prawbly View Post
What a great article !! Thanks Ronnie it was great. I will try it out exactly like that and see what happens. I was losing confidence pretty fast. Thinking of removing 48 stubborn studs is a depressing thought. Thank you very much for taking time. I saved it for future use. - - Pat
Consider using a 1/2" breaker bar and socket instead of impact wrench, it will give you much better feel for what is happening.
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Old 12-18-2015, 09:48 AM   #10
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Default Re: removing studs

The best advice in the Ford Garage that Ronnie posted was to throw out all your Broken Outs, ("easy outs"). Right now, do not hesitate for a minute. Smile as you do it, thinking about all the time and frustration you will be saving yourself.
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Old 12-18-2015, 10:05 AM   #11
Kurt in NJ
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Default Re: removing studs

I used to work real hard at getting the studs out whole so there was no need to drill, after using the tig the washer on method I realized that it was quicker and easier to just break off the unwilling studs
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Old 12-18-2015, 10:37 AM   #12
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Default Re: removing studs

Quote:
Originally Posted by SofaKing View Post
Consider using a 1/2" breaker bar and socket instead of impact wrench, it will give you much better feel for what is happening.

Actually I have done so many head stud's,and bolts,exhaust manifolds,aluminum castings,small screws in firearms (gun's usually only need a propane torch and a candle to get them out)The use of an impact is actually the best.I don't use a conventional air impact but an 18 volt Makita cordless 1/2" impact.These impact guns have real nice trigger control and I usually try to tighten it first and then many small bursts in reverse.On smaller 1/4 and smaller screws you won't need an impact they just turn out. Quenching the stud with a candle wax as it cools is an asset as well.Don't quench when it is red hot as anything burns off wait a bit and then quench.I learned this trick years ago calling on machine shops,they all use this to remove those impossible oil gallery plugs in many diesel engines.Hope this helps you guy's.

R
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Old 12-18-2015, 10:40 AM   #13
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Default Re: removing studs

Don't be afraid of heat. You don't need special equipment or make them glowing cherry red. You'd be surprised how much you can accomplish with a simple plumbing propane torch.
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Old 12-18-2015, 10:41 AM   #14
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Default Re: removing studs

Here are a few pictures
Attached Images
File Type: jpg studs.jpg (56.0 KB, 66 views)
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Old 12-18-2015, 11:48 AM   #15
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Default Re: removing studs

MAN !! - - THANKS !! Thanks Guys ! So many giving time to help. Being a new member this impresses me. Thanks to all of you. I don't have a tig welder. (Too expensive) will a reg arc welder work ? I have some 1/16 rod that I use for thin wall tubing. It should work if I'm careful. I've learned from exhaust manifold work that cast iron is impressive material. It can be your best friend or your most stubborn enemy. Thanks again to a bunch of great people. - - Pat
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Old 12-18-2015, 11:58 AM   #16
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Default Re: removing studs

That article makes it look easy. Question: won't a mig welder work just as well for those who don't have a tig welder?
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Old 12-18-2015, 12:10 PM   #17
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Default Re: removing studs

I have been very successful using "double nuts" and a pipe wrench at the very base of the stud. Use both at once... I rarely break a head stud. Obviously rocking the stud back and forth and plenty of liquid penetrant.
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Old 12-18-2015, 01:13 PM   #18
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Default Re: removing studs

When I have a stuck stud, I do not go to the point of breaking them off. After the easy ones come out with the double nut method then I go to step two. I cut the stud off about 1" long and drop a 1/2' cheap nut over the 7/16' stud. I then weld the nut to the stud with my mig welder (works great if you don't have a tig setup). Then I take a impact gun and just sit on that nut until something happens. Either the weld breaks or the stud comes out. If the weld breaks, reweld it and go again. This is the only method that I have found that is 100%.
Just an opinion
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Old 12-18-2015, 01:19 PM   #19
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Default Re: removing studs

Prawbly,
Yes, a regular arc welder will work. Takes a little more care and or skill.
I've done this many times.
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Old 12-18-2015, 04:22 PM   #20
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Default Re: removing studs

Quote:
Originally Posted by 34pickup View Post
That article makes it look easy. Question: won't a mig welder work just as well for those who don't have a tig welder?

A mig will get it done. I use tig because I don't need or want a mig.

Tig is easier because you have infinite control of the heat. A mig is like a light switch it is either on or off like a arc welder.A tig you can back off on the pedal and just sit there as long as you want,no time limit. This is where the heat soak has an advantage. But the others will get it done just not as easy.

R
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