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Old 04-08-2018, 09:59 AM   #1
woofa.express
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Default tell a Model A related story

My computerskill is ordinary and I don’t know how to add to the thread of ‘ Tell a Model A related story’. So here is a new thread on my A story.
I grew up inNew Zealand and left school in 1965. I always looked up to the bigger boys who had left school quite a bit earlier and who drove Model A’s which was the obsolete family car.
In 1967 Imoved to Australia in search of a pilot job and became an agricultural pilot,commonly called a cropduster. ( I retire this year after 50 years ofcropdusting).
One day in1973 I went to spread fertilizer on pasture for a farmer in the New England region of New South Wales. The farmer arrived to give me instructions. He was driving an A. A tourer (phaeton) cut down to a Ute (pickup). I crawled over it,asked many questions and was probably a nuisance. The farmer’s son arrived,also in an A. Then another, again in an A. Well how many do you have? Eleven was the reply. He went on to explain they bought them at clearing sales for about 10 pound each. (Imperial currency was superseded in 1966 with decimal currency).
He showed me one in a shed and the only restoration it required was a new head liner. I had to ask of course, would he sell me one. No he wouldn’t. But I always liked him for what he did. They all were undercover and thus not deteriorating.
Years passed but my love for the A still remained. Well in 1988 one was advertised locally and its condition was appalling. I made the purchase much to the disgust of my wife along with much verbal abuse. All up it cost me 33K AUD to get restored. I am a poor mechanic and don’t enjoy the work so it was all done by hired professional people. It did represent about twice the market value of the vehicle. But I was both pleased and proud. It has a beautiful engine and performs well.
Today I havethat same car plus 2 others as well as the first Australian all made vehicle, a Holden (G.M.) with 23500 miles on the speedo. (One for each of my kids). They have succeeded in keeping me poor but I love them. My wife has learned to tolerate them and the amount of verbal has reduced.
I use the Ute a lot and I’m happy for all and sundry to take any of them for a drive. I’m not protective with them and if people express concern about damaging them I tell them they were resurrected from a damaged pile of junk and can be again.
My log onname to ‘Ford Barn’ is Woofa express. Woofa is the hound in the picture. He is not allowed in the house or our cars with the exception of the A. Woofa considers the A to be his car.
I am a member of our local vintage car club plus the Victorian Model A Club. It is pleasing to get help from the A club and ‘Ford Barn’. There are so many people who are willing to share their knowledge out there. I take this opportunity to say thankyou to those people.

Last edited by woofa.express; 04-08-2018 at 10:21 AM. Reason: spelling error
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Old 04-08-2018, 10:46 AM   #2
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Hi there, I enjoyed your story. Iíve always thought that cropdusting would be a real hoot, and Iíve never talked with someone who did it as a profession.

I grew up in Oregon in the Pacific northwestern part of the US. There werenít a lot of people in this state back then and we still arenít densely populated. Lots of open land and more than a few cropdusters.

My model A stories start over 60 years ago when I was 13. My first car was a 1931 coupe that I bought for $25. That car didnít have a dent in it, and really didnít need restoration. I took it apart anyway and learned about every nut and bolt in that car. My love of cars really started with that coupe, and Iíll never forget it. That car taught me how to drive in every condition you can think of, and I owe my love of driving to that first coupe.

I consider myself so fortunate that I grew up in a time when model Aís were a dime a dozen. I miss those times when a simple drive could result in finding a model A hidden in a berry patch or sitting in a barn. All those drives were like treasure hunts for me, and man did I find a lot of treasure. My folks allowed me to have one car at a time. So, when one was up and running, Iíd sell it and get another. That love of those old model Aís kept me out of trouble. I donít even want to imagine the trouble I would have gotten into if it hadnít been for those cars.

Give Woofa a pet for me,

Mike
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Old 04-08-2018, 01:09 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by wingski View Post
Hi there, I enjoyed your story. Iíve always thought that cropdusting would be a real hoot, and Iíve never talked with someone who did it as a profession.

I grew up in Oregon in the Pacific northwestern part of the US. There werenít a lot of people in this state back then and we still arenít densely populated. Lots of open land and more than a few cropdusters.

My model A stories start over 60 years ago when I was 13. My first car was a 1931 coupe that I bought for $25. That car didnít have a dent in it, and really didnít need restoration. I took it apart anyway and learned about every nut and bolt in that car. My love of cars really started with that coupe, and Iíll never forget it. That car taught me how to drive in every condition you can think of, and I owe my love of driving to that first coupe.

I consider myself so fortunate that I grew up in a time when model Aís were a dime a dozen. I miss those times when a simple drive could result in finding a model A hidden in a berry patch or sitting in a barn. All those drives were like treasure hunts for me, and man did I find a lot of treasure. My folks allowed me to have one car at a time. So, when one was up and running, Iíd sell it and get another. That love of those old model Aís kept me out of trouble. I donít even want to imagine the trouble I would have gotten into if it hadnít been for those cars.

Give Woofa a pet for me,

Mike

hi Mike. that's a good story too. you were so lucky to get access to such a large amount of A's.
I've been to Klamath Falls in your state. I had a cropdusting mate at Williams Cal who flew me up there and on to Walla Walla. Sadly prostate took him. He survived 2 Viet Nam tours as helicopter pilot and years of cropdusting to be taken out with health issue.


I was impressed at Klamath because the military were able to operate with airliners, light aircraft and cropdusters. The military here think they are above all others and it is below their dignity to mix with other 'lowly' types. shame.


Thanks for your response, cheers, gary
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Old 04-08-2018, 02:42 PM   #4
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

I was parked at a casino and a very, very old, and very grayed haired lady came by and started looking at my car, she started to tear up, told me it brought back many fond memories, she thanked me and left.
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Old 04-08-2018, 03:34 PM   #5
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Hey WOOFA.EXPRESS, I enjoyed your Model A story. Here is a rather long story about my first Model A. This was published in one of the Model A Magazines a few years ago and I updated it again a couple years ago. Now I have to get it running again so my Grandson and I can drive it 1800 miles to it's new home when he turns 16 in 2019. Really looking forward to that. Enjoy the read and maybe I'll send you another about my original 1931 Station Wagon with wood wheels. Dick Knapp


On the road again after 45 year rest... by Dick Knapp
This is my 1929 Business Coupe that I drove to High School in 1955. It was my Grandpa's only transportation for
many years and I remember riding home in this car to spend the weekend with he and Grandma. My Grandpa bought this car from Ward Winchester in Clintonville, Wisconsin sometime in the late 40's. I got the car in 1954. When sanding the doors to prepare for a new paint job I found a logo on the doors for The Commonwealth Telephone Company. Perhaps that was the telephone company in Clintonville in the late 30's. I kinda restored it ( I think you know what I mean) in 1964. I changed it to a Sport Coupe with a rumble seat. Then it was parked while we raised a family and moved around the country with the US Air Force. About 2008 I got serious about giving this car a good restoration and I decided that it had to go back to a Business Coupe.
Many old cars nuts have an interesting story and I hope that you enjoy this story about me and my 1929 Model A Business Coupe. It starts in the early 1950's. I grew up in a little town called Clintonville, not too far from Iola, Wisconsin. My car experiences started early when my Mom decided I needed something to do to keep me out of trouble over summer school vacations. She took me to the local JCís sign-up for the Soap Box Derby program as soon as I was eligible at age 10. After winning third place that first year I was hooked and went on to compete every year until I was fifteen. I won some races and always finished near the top, but never won the Green Bay regional event for the trip to Akron.
Actually, my experience as a developing gear head and old car nut started even earlier. My Dad had left our family when I was about eight or nine and both of my Grandpasís spent extra time with me, their oldest Grandson. My Grandpa in Clintonville had a full time wrecking business. He lived just across the street and had a small wrecking yard right behind our house. What a great place for a kid to play! My other Grandpa had a part time wrecking business in Bear Creek, so it is no wonder that I was developing a love for old cars.
When Grandpa got a call to pick up an old car, he would call me to go along in the wrecker. Iola,, Big Falls, Symco and Marion were places I remember going to often to haul a Model T, Model A or old Studebaker out of the weeds. If the car didnít have tires, the front end was winched up on to the back of the wrecker. Then the cable was run over the top to the back bumper. The car could be winched up off the ground, but of course the top was crushed with a big crease from the cable. When we would get back from these trips my Grandpa usually gave me a quarter with the advice that I should put it in the bank because I could get three percent interest on it.
Grandpa was anxious for me to learn how to drive that wrecker so I could be more help to him. My legs were not long enough to reach the pedals, so I would sit on his lap and steer while he worked the pedals and his big hand covered mine as he guided me through the gears on that four-speed. I eventually could reach the pedals by sitting on the front edge of the seat. That led to driving the wrecker around the bone yard helping move motors and cars here and there. The wrecker had a winch that was PTO driven. A lever in the floor engaged the winch. The transmission had to be in neutral and you had to let the clutch out to work the winch. I remember one incident very well with this winch. Grandpa unhooked the motor I just hauled and he hooked the loose cable to one of the boom supports. I drove off to pick up another motor not realizing that I had not taken the winch out of gear. The cable was tightening up and pulling the entire boom up and over, coming down soon to crush the cab. Grandpa saw what was happening and stopped me before a real disaster happened. He was not happy and Iím not sure, but I probably did not get my quarter that day.
At fifteen years old I was through racing Soap Box Derby cars, so I went to the local Ford garage to apply for a job. They hired me be to sweep floors, pump gas, wash and grease cars and stock shelves. What I wouldnít give now to go through some of those shelves of new old stock parts. One day someone traded in a 40 Ford convertible with a Columbia overdrive. I really wanted that car. I talked the salesman into letting me take it home to get Mom's approval (and financial support) to buy it. I took my Grandpa from Bear Creek and my Mom for a ride, but they were not too impressed. They didnít think that a 16 year old needed a hot V-8 convertible. So, they came up with a plan. Mom would buy Grandpa a mid 40ís Studebaker and Grandpa would give me his Model A Business coupe. Well, that is what happened and this Model A became my wheels through High School in 1955. It was stored through our early years of marriage and in the mid-60's I restored it as best as I knew how. I put about 1500 miles on it and we decided that a Model A sedan would be better with our three small children. So, this Model A was stored and would not see the road again for 45 years. In 2010, after a two- year restoration, the finished restoration picture was taken on my first test drive. I sent this article and a picture to Old Cars magazine and it made the cover and featured article for that month. This soon became my favorite ride. We took it to my 55th class reunion in Clintonville in September, 2010.
I think my Grandpa would be pleased to know that I plan to continue the tradition and give this car to Preston, my oldest Grandson. He is 14 now and this car will be his if he wants it when he turns sixteen (I am hoping that he does not plan to put a hot V-8 in it). I am also hoping that together we can drive it to California in 2019 and hoping that his Dad will sell some Mustangs to make room for another great car.
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Old 04-08-2018, 08:45 PM   #6
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Love Model A stories. My 30 Cabby was redone in the 60's in NY someplace. Smokey has carried me many-a mile with new stories every trip.
We were someplace and an elderly couple came up to her. The purple haired lady was looking longingly in the Rumble seat. I've seen that misty look before so I sez "Did you ever fool around in a rumble seat. Her eyes watered as she blurted out "YES, but not with HIM"!! Then my eyes watered...
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Old 04-09-2018, 03:01 AM   #7
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I was parked at a casino and a very, very old, and very grayed haired lady came by and started looking at my car, she started to tear up, told me it brought back many fond memories, she thanked me and left.
Very similar story, while travelling through Central Australia returning home from the National Model A Meet we had stopped at a trailer park where we had spent two nights. I was taking the opportunity to service the car when I was approached by an older gentleman who showed much interest in the car, he asked all the usual questions and was a very interesting man to talk to. As I had time to spare i asked him if he would like to go for a drive. He readily accepted my offer.
He chatted as we drove down the road but suddenly I detected a change in his voice as he stopped talking. I looked across at him and he had tears streaming down his face. Somewhat embarressed he explained. I had just taken him back to when he was a 13 year old child sitting beside his dad in their Model A on the way to school.
Never under estimate the memories that our cars evoke.
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Old 04-09-2018, 11:46 AM   #8
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Love the stories.............keep them coming
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Old 04-09-2018, 12:44 PM   #9
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15 years ago, I was browsing the local auto trader. There is a 1931 model a pickup for $1250. It's a complete truck with lower rust on the cab. So off I go with trailer in tow. When I got there, Chicago suburb, I mentioned to the seller that there were some odd things about the truck. First, the bed appeared to be off a later year and then there was the roof which was filled in with sheet metal. The seller told me that other potential buyers said pretty much the same thing. He says "just give me $650 and it's yours". Not knowing much about model a's at the time, I went ahead and bought it. After doing a little research I find that what I bought was a Late 31, indented firewall, widebed with the steel top. And fwiw, painted steel radiator shroud and headlights. Still have it. Done nothing with it yet. There is sits.
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Old 04-09-2018, 12:56 PM   #10
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now comes later in the year that one of my neighbors complained to the county about me having a truck in the back yard. Sure enough, here they come and tell me that I can't do that and I have to move it. I asked the county about any ordinance regarding yard art. When they asked me why, I said that if I have to move it that it was going to be moved to the middle of my front yard and that I will be sure to decorate it for whatever holiday is upon us. Lets just say that the truck stayed where it was until I got my garage built.
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Old 04-09-2018, 01:06 PM   #11
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Prostate Cancer is an affection us guys have to worry about. After age 65, 75% will have Prostate Cancer, mine appeared at age 65 right on the money. I had it removed and don't regret it for the most part. After the cancer escapes the Prostate it considered incurable and only treatable. Keep a check on your PSA number Guys.
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Old 04-09-2018, 01:12 PM   #12
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I have SO MANY STORIES, I wouldn't know WHERE to start!!!---It'd take me FOREVER, to tipe even ONE!
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Old 04-09-2018, 01:36 PM   #13
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B, How 'bout you and them 3girls in the rumble in a rainstorm...
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Old 04-09-2018, 01:56 PM   #14
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In the late 1960s my parents frequented a small store called D&W's, which was located about a block from our house. My father, who owned a 1937 Ford at the time, knew the store owner Wally. Wally had a 1929 Model A Fordor sedan. Sometimes he would drive it to work and park it in the grass field adjacent to the small store.

One day we went to the store and Wally was closing up. When we were done with our business in the store Wally left his wife in charge and gave me and my dad a ride in the Model A Fordor. The seats were nice and the car was in perfect shape. My first ride in someone else's antique auto. Fifty years ago and I remember it still.
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Old 04-09-2018, 02:00 PM   #15
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My father, who instilled the love of the Model A in me, used to tell a story about when he was dating my mother in the late 40s just after the war. He had a 30 two door sedan and was taking my mom to the local dance. When it was time to go home they encountered a bunch of later model cars stuck in the mud in the middle of the road. Of course the Model A went right through to the other side and then Dad procceded to pull the other cars out.Somehow in the process my mothers dress got splashed with mud coming through the floor boards and she got very mad. Dad said that was almost the end of the courtship but luckily for me it wasn't. Dad said Mom hated that Model A and would make him park blocks away from any destination so that no one would see them in it. Dad loved that Model A more than anything. Frank
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Old 04-09-2018, 03:49 PM   #16
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yeh. Like to hear that one Clem.
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Old 04-09-2018, 04:37 PM   #17
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I have ookbeen an old car nut always and have always noticed the old hulks hiding in the weeds and barn when no one with ever sees a thing. 40 Years ago when I was around 20, I found a farmers scrap yard in northern Wisconsin. It was along a fence line in a low area that looks like it would collect water. Everyone in the area would give him their stuff to get rid of. I walked back in there and mentally noted at least 20 restorable cars along with parts of another 10. They were mostly fords 20s, 30s, and 40s. When my son was around 20, we went back to the same area and it appeared to be all gone from the road. In reality the tree line had grown up all around it to almost completely cover the area. We walked back up in there and the treasure is still mostly there! There are two stock cars, a 41 ford coupe and a 39 ford Coupe both with the steel cages and roll bars and still having there flathead V8 intact. They both have advertising on them and the pit crews and drivers name painted on with a brush! Cant find anyone that lives within 5 miles of the spot that admits they owns this stash !! !!!
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Old 04-09-2018, 05:58 PM   #18
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My Last Drive.

While out driving around in my model A, I swerved to avoid hitting a deer, lost control and landed in a ditch, severely banging my head.
Dazed and confused I crawled out of the ditch to the edge of the road when a shinny new convertible pulled up with a very beautiful woman who asked, "Are you okay?"
As I looked up, I noticed she was wearing a low cut blouse with cleavage to die for...
"I'm okay I think," I replied as I pulled myself up to the side of the car to get a closer look.
She said, “Get in and I’ll take you home so I can clean and bandage that nasty scrape on your head.”
"That's nice of you," I answered, but I don't think my wife will like me doing that!
"Oh, come now, I’m a nurse," she insisted. "I need to see if you have any more scrapes and then treat them properly."
Well, she was really pretty and very persuasive. Being sort of shaken and weak, I agreed, but repeated, "I'm sure my wife won't like this."
We arrived at her place which was just few miles away and, after a couple of cold beers and the bandaging, I thanked her and said, "I feel a lot better but I know my wife is going to be really upset so I'd better go now."
"Don't be silly!" she said with a smile, while unbuttoning her blouse exposing the most beautiful set of boobs I’ve ever seen. "Stay for a while. She won't know anything. By the way, where is she?"
"Still in the ditch with my model A, I guess."
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Old 04-09-2018, 06:53 PM   #19
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My Dad used to tell me a Model A Story. Two friends of his used to visit him in Washington, D.C. during prohibition. They would always bring him a little sample from St Mary's County, Maryland. One week they rounded a curve to fast on the way back to the country and turned over into a field. The next week they had a friend with them.
The driver said, "Hey, this is the turn we took to fast last week..." and did it again. The friend told my Dad, but the guys tried to deny it. The dented fenders attested to the story.
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Old 04-10-2018, 03:29 AM   #20
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The purchase of my first A; Ďthe staff carí








After makingthe purchase of my first A I drove it home. It was running very poorly,difficult to drive and was quite a spectacle for all to see. I had paid $2k forthis and the farmer who sold it to me thought I was just nuts. He was correct .
As I said, quitea spectacle. When I reached our small town of 2000 I followed a ute (pickup)that had a load of school kids, all in cricket whites, armed with shin pads andbats and stumps. Everything one uses to play cricket. They were being driven tothe sports grounds to play.
Well whenthey saw me in that car, now Jed Clampettís car couldnít hold a candle to it,they with outstretched arms gave me the thumbs up. At that very instant, as ifit was their signal of command, the car got wheel shimmy. With their outstretchedarms their thumbs up immediately became an outstretched fore finger pointing atme, heads held right back and they were roaring with laughter. I think I still had their approval.
Then intoour back yard. Didnít get wifeís approval. Instead got her abuse. What? Whatwill you do with that? We donít have much money and youíve just blown a heap ona pile of rusty tin!
Well thingsremained at a standstill for a while. As I said we had no money. Eventually itwas rebuilt and runs well. She has softened. It is painted desert sand (light)and has been named Ďthe staff carí.
It was usedin my business. For a 2 month period we accommodated an additional 2 pilotsduring the rice sowing season. In the morning we took a car each to work becausewe would return that evening at differing times. The first two out tookvehicles with closed cabins and the last took the A. Mornings were quite cool.However the first to return home in the afternoon or evening took the A. It waswarm then.
A traditionat the start of every season was to buy new and ridiculous hats. One yearMexican. On this particular afternoon we donned these hats and drove 10 milessouth to Tocumwal. I well remember, infact would never forget, being overtakenby an expensive Landrover with 3 mature and well dressed ĎLadiesí. As the drewabeam the all turned and looked left (we drive on the left in Au). At that very instant they broke down withlaughter. Difficult to describe the instantaneous and intensity of that verymoment but the 3 of us still mention it from time to time. The incident was notintended to attract attention however I shall not forget it. I betcha theladies in the Landrover wonít either neither will the kids in the back of the ute.
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Old 04-10-2018, 04:44 AM   #21
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My First A:The Staff Car.


I purchased this from a farmer who lives near Deniliquin which is 40 miles to the east of our town, Tocumwal. In New South Wales (NSW).


There is one commercial business between the towns. A pub at Blighty. (those Irish are pretty good at stealing our place names arenít they?). It is the community meeting place for local farmers and others. The pub always has a good and happy atmosphere. They were serving 120 meals each Friday night. Now thatís pretty good for a little farming community.


Now itís patronage has become so small the publican is considering closing. Why? Random Breath Testing. For no good reason it became a target of what is Highway Patrol (I call Highway men). They are the most despicable police in NSW. A police training school is located in Deniliquin and there are cops there with little to do. You know what that leads to donít you.


Well in the town of Deniliquin the locals are sick of them too. So they got even. Cops arrived at a popular hotel one evening for no good reason. When they departed by reversing out there was an awful crunch and scrape. The front axel was detached and laying on the ground just in front of the bumper bar. (a 4 wheel drive thus a straight through axel with a diff in between). Inspection found a chain around the axel and coupled to a power pole infront of where the vehicle was parked.


Not surprisingly they could not find a culprit but they did find a hotel full of jubilant drinkers.


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Old 04-10-2018, 04:52 AM   #22
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Hello Marvin.
yes, it's a problem for all of us. however it seems good news has arrived on the horizon. the injection of steam kills it all. I'm not a medical man but that's what I read in the newspaper.
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Old 04-10-2018, 04:53 AM   #23
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there's 2 more there now Ben
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Old 04-10-2018, 07:06 AM   #24
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When I first started driving, my model Aís were not real weather-proof. You didnít want to hit a big pot-hole or youíd blow a tire, and if that pot-hole was full of water, you got wet. I got so used to drafts that now I feel uncomfortable unless there is a fan blowing overhead. And the rattles, whenever I rode in a modern car back then, it seemed so quiet. My god, you could even have a conversation without raising your voice.

Those days are long gone now, but whenever I drive any of my newer vehicles Iím still amazed at how dry and warm I am when itís really raining out there. I make a comment to my wife about lucky we are to be so comfortable, and she looks at me like Iím nuts. When I comment about how well the wipers work compared to my old cars, she just shakes her head. I guess you had to experience the drafts, wet floorboards, shitty visibility, and rattles to be able to appreciate how far cars have come.

Her first car was a brand new 1964 and 1/2 Mustang convertible, and she lived just outside Detroit. Iíve always wondered what the serial number was on that thing before her older brother wrecked it. It might have been one of the first 100 Mustang convertibles ever made.

My first car was a 1931 Ford coupe for $25. Hey, it was only 27 years old at the time, and I thought that car was the neatest car in the world. Only my older friends had cars, and all my friends that were my age couldnít believe that I had my own car. They didnít know that I was too young to legally own it. The title was in my folkís name, and I really didnít own squat, but every penny that bought and went into that car had come from me and me alone.

I can remember the other boys my age coming over to watch me work on it. I taught them a lot about what wrench was for what. I remember the girls I had grown up with coming over to just watch Mike work on his car.

Those were very different times, and they made me who I am today. I feel so fortunate to have had parents that realized that a greasy, grimy 13 year old was better than one out getting in trouble.

Mike
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Old 04-10-2018, 08:57 AM   #25
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with 23500 miles on the speedo. (one for each of my kids).
wow
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Old 04-10-2018, 10:25 AM   #26
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wow
When asked if he had any Kids, my son, Gregg (RIP) would say, "Not that I know about"!---LOL
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Old 04-19-2018, 03:15 PM   #27
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Winnie theblue dog crashes vintage car.

Well I wasboth proud and pleased with my restored 28 A model. It was advertised in theMelbourne newspaper by a local farmer in our area. Had been a paddock basheruntil it wasnít even any good for that. 2K was the asking price and whilst Icouldnít immediately put my hands on that money the farmer agreed he would keepit for me until I could come up with it. There was numerous enquiries fromMelbourne which was 200 miles south.
I had itwell restored costing twice itís market value but I was pleased.
I had a dog,a blue healer cattle dog by the name of Winnie. Winnie had been my daughtersdog. Given to her as a puppy which outgrew its cuteness when it grew into a propersize hound. It was left with us, her parents, on a temporary permanent basis. I have heard many stories about parentsinheriting dogs from their kids.
Itís ourpolicy not to have dogs in the house or car. One exception is the Model A. Winniewould sit on the floor only and never miss an opportunity of going where everit took her.
One thisparticular day, with the car running and parked in our yard, with the driversdoor open (itís always been my policy to close car doors) Winnie was not goingto miss this ride. Up she jumped and squeezed between the seat and the gearstick. The gear stick was pushed forward and almost without a crunch was inreverse. I saw this. The staff car chugging backwards and approaching a 3000gallon fuel tank. Well the expected occurred. Crunch. I hadnít made it back to thevehicle at that moment and here was the staff car held stationary with wheelsrotating in the dirt.
I climbedin. Winnie gave one of those dog smiles to display her pleasure. I gave her apat. How could I be pissed with something she did not intend and had no idea ofmy panic and 7 second 100 yard dash.
Fortunately damagewas minimal and the rear bumper bar had saved the day. She continued her chaufferdriven rides and we still loved her.
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Old 04-19-2018, 03:20 PM   #28
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Keep a check on your PSA number Guys.

yes, males have a prostate. Females don't.
Isn't the modern term quite silly. Including girls as guys?
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Old 04-20-2018, 08:09 AM   #29
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My father most always took me to work with him when I was old enough to clean parts and tools etc. One day I overheard him tell a customer about something happening at a Ford Shop where he worked before WWll.
He just happened to be working on a Model A when he noticed a very unkempt man nosing around the shop. The Bum was looking and watching everyone and everything but touched nothing and talked to no one. When my father noticed the guy seemed to have moved on he asked the shop foreman about the guy and the foreman said, "nobody important, just Henry Ford".
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Old 04-20-2018, 12:16 PM   #30
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In 1958 I was driving my almost new Corvette when a Model A pickup passed, going in the opposite direction. I chased him down and bought it for the outrageous price of $150, about half-again what most A's were going for but it was pretty straight and I wanted an A pickup. It was almost stock, 16" steel wheels, '30 rad shell and sealed beam headlights. Turned out to be an early, late '31. No solid top but all the rest of the late-'31 stuff. I ran it for a few months until 2nd gear lost a tooth, then put in a 2-port Riley, B trans with Zephyr gears. It has since had a 4-port Cook, a Cyclone flathead and now a 4-port Riley on a late '31 block, and a Colombia diff. The body is still stock and will remain that way. I now have a speedster and a Vicky, but my favorite driver is still the wide-bed. It will cruise all day at 65-70 MPH, and get 20+ MPG. Like other Model A's, it gets looks from people all the time, so there are other stories too, and I enjoy reading about them.
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Old 04-27-2018, 10:53 AM   #31
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Today my wife mustered up her friends and a few fellas and we drove 55km, (about 35miles) north to the town of Jerilderie.
The town isfamous for a bank robbery by Australia’s most notorious highway gang. A family by the name of Kelly. A bit like the English gang of Robin Hood. Well the Kelly gang held up the entire town for 3 days until someone could find the bank manager to open the bank safe. They took two and a half thousand pounds which I am told is the equivalent of 4 million today. They burned the deeds to loans so as the bank had no security on money they lent to farmers. Unfortunately for the farmers the bank had duplicates stored in Melbourne, about 250 miles south.They got away with this and many other robberies for a long time but eventually they were betrayed. Today the nation has conflicting opinions on the “Kelly Gang”. Many believe the police tormented them, others believe they were just cold blooded police killers.
Another historical fact is Australia’s most famous soldier grew up there. John Monash. Bought precision to the WW1 battle field in Europe. Considered the best allied general.
The Queen’shat maker or what was once called a milliner was born in Jerilderie. Frederic Fox.
And an author by the name of Ruth Ham is a Jerilderie girl. She wrote a book which turned into a delightful and funny movie by the name of “the dressmaker”.
A late resident by the name of Michael Hastings lived there. According to records acquired by British “Thames TV” Michael was the legitimate king of England. It was claimed by British that the legitimacy of the blood line had been busted unless a previous Queen (named and I don’t remember who) had an 11 months gestation period whilst the king was at war. Well Michael reckoned it was difficult enough being a Pom in Australia let alone a titled one. He had no desire to challengethe British Royals.
The population is, according to a 2016 census is 1029.
Well back to our day in Jerilderie. We had a tour around the old “Westpac” bank, house and gardens. Tea and scones. The house was packed with memorabilia. Packed and interesting. Includes the safe, which the Kelly’s had waited 3 days to get open.The hosts, Roy and Beth are great hosts. Beth plays the piano like a true entertainer. Roy was a dance teacher and taught many well know Australian dancers. Roy had been a collector all his life. He had about 20 antique cars. He believes about twenty. Mostly late 20’s. Included 2 Model A’s. All stored in old turkey sheds.
Well one day a bloke turned up and asked to buy either one or the lot. He was greeted by Roy’s mum who was more than 80 yo. Well Roy’s mum said she would like to get theplace cleaned up and told them to take the lot. Roy doesn’t know who they were or where the cars ended up. Mum wasn’t paid a cent. One, an Overlander, onceRoy’s dad’s car had taken Roy 4 years to pay off an interim owner.
The receiver of the cars was never heard of again and I would consider him a thief. Roy said he never reprimanded his mother. “She was over 80 so what was the point.”

Last edited by woofa.express; 04-27-2018 at 10:59 AM. Reason: grammar errors
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Old 04-28-2018, 05:12 PM   #32
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In 1966 I was a student at Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa, California. We had to go to Palm Springs for a Journalism Conference. Since a 1930 Model A Coupe was the only car I owned, my girl friend and I drove it the 125 or so miles over to Palm Springs. She was all dressed up in a nice dress and panty hose and high heels. However, it was a warm day and the Model A was running a bit warm climbing from the coast to Riverside and then over the top of the hill. The panty hose became intolerable and she decided that they had to come off! We were running just a little bit late and did not want to stop and in those days there were not too many places to stop. She just pulled up her dress into her lap and then wiggled and wiggled and half stood up in order to get the panty hose to come off. I'm sure they were pretty sweaty in cab of that Model A chugging up the hill with the GAV cranked open and the spark advance almost to the bottom, up just enough to stop the spark knock. Well, there were no panties under the panty hose and it was all that I could do to keep the car on the road...we still know each other and we still laugh about that trip once in a while...We were only 19 at the time, and it was a long time ago...but I can still see every detail...Ernie

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Old 04-30-2018, 08:56 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Ernie Vitucci View Post
In 1966 I was a student at Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa, California. We had to go to Palm Springs for a Journalism Conference. Since a 1930 Model A Coupe was the only car I owned, my girl friend and I drove it the 125 or so miles over to Palm Springs. She was all dressed up in a nice dress and panty hose and high heels. However, it was a warm day and the Model A was running a bit warm climbing from the coast to Riverside and then over the top of the hill. The panty hose became intolerable and she decided that they had to come off! We were running just a little bit late and did not want to stop and in those days there were not too many places to stop. She just pulled up her dress into her lap and then wiggled and wiggled and half stood up in order to get the panty hose to come off. I'm sure they were pretty sweaty in cab of that Model A chugging up the hill with the GAV cranked open and the spark advance almost to the bottom, up just enough to stop the spark knock. Well, there were no panties under the panty hose and it was all that I could do to keep the car on the road...we still know each other and we still laugh about that trip once in a while...We were only 19 at the time, and it was a long time ago...but I can still see every detail...Ernie
Ernie you dog.

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Old 04-30-2018, 09:21 PM   #34
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Woof!
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Old 04-30-2018, 09:33 PM   #35
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I'm sure most of you read this before, but if you missed it, enjoy

My Very First Model A

David K. Mc Arthur, Danville, California
I was a young firefighter in Oakland, California. At that time we were called Firemen and we were just that, men that fought fires. Anyway, over the fence from the firehouse I could see what appeared to be some old car with four doors and no top of any sort. One day I saw movement in that yard and ran out and got the attention of some guy that was taking his trash to his burn barrel.
The gentleman came to the fence and we discussed the car to the point I knew I had to have it and he knew I would bring him $25 come payday. Like all Model Aís for sale, then as now, ďit had run when they parked it, with a new rebuild on the engine.Ē Though it had been a Fordor sedan it had now been made into a rough Phaeton by his brother who owned a good hacksaw. What I saw was what I would get.
Come payday we exchanged $25 for a piece of paper that said I could have the car and that all paperwork had been lost. He was an Oakland cop so I trusted that he hadnít personally stolen it. The deal was wrapped up. I would pull the car out of there when I could find someone fool enough to help me.
Finding that fool didnít take long. My oldest brother, Perry, had a 1955 Ford truck and a piece of strong parachute cord, some type of nylon line that was very long. He and I went to the house. We and a few friends of the cop pushed the car out to the street and tied the two vehicles together with the parachute cord, leaving plenty of room between them for emergencies; though we all knew nothing could possible go wrong.
My brother leaped in his truck and I into the Model A. Immediately he was in motion. I sat there and watched as he drove a good hundred feet and probably more with the cord getting tighter and tighter, yet I hadnít moved. Then suddenly I was under way. Boy, was I underway. Went from zero to the hundred feet in two seconds as my brother made sure to outrun me.
I thought we had discussed going easy at first until we knew I had some brakes and steering that worked. I guess Perry missed that part of the conversation. When we got to the first intersection, he slowed down and I couldnít so he made a sharp right onto
Piedmont Avenue and yanked me around that corner, as once more he outran me, By now I knew that there were very little if an brakes and that it had very stiff steering. Though I was a young bull, I had the devil of a time turning the steering wheel.
The next major intersection was a breeze, Perry drove through the yellow light a good hundred feet in front of me and made his left turn onto Mac Arthur Blvd, a four lane major thoroughfare through Oakland. Of course, I was now approaching a red light at half the speed of sound, screaming at cars to stay where they were. They did because they saw a white thread across their path and then I came through with half flat tires squealing as I attempted the turn to follow my brother. The nylon grew back to its normal size as I now began to approach his rear bumper. He drove faster and I began to see a bit of distance between us. He then had to stop for the signal at Fruitvale Avenue. I had no such trouble, running into the back of him and knocking him about half way up to Lincoln Avenue. That is a very long block.
We next had to cross 35th Avenue, High Street and eventually make the turn on 73rd Avenue to Bancroft. Each time I knocked his poor truck through the intersection and each time the Good Lord was kind to us both. He didnít die of whiplash and I wasnít skewered like a roast by the steering column of the Model A. We got to my brother-in-lawís Texaco Service Station and had our last collision of the day. As Perry stopped beside the station, I passed him and hit a concrete barrier behind the building.
Other than my brothers back bumper and fenders there appeared to be no lasting damage. We pulled and pushed, kicked and pried and shortly his truck looked good enough for who it was for and the Model A was probably in better shape than when we started because now all the wheels turned and the steering had lightened up as some of the grease finally worked its way over the steering gears.
The car sat there for a couple of months and eventually it disappeared and I didnít even ask where it went for years. Then I asked the brother in law and he said he thought I came and got it. So it really had just disappeared. Probably best for all involved, except the poor fool that stole it.
May-June 2017 ē The Restorer
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Old 04-30-2018, 10:37 PM   #36
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My Grand Father came to Detroit from Bay City Michigan in order to support his family. He had a little grocery store but it was just keeping the doors open and not making enough to live. There were ads in all the papers about Ford's Five Dollar Day! He came to work at the River Rouge Plant. He was put in the casting department. He said it was very hard , hot, dirty and very loud in that part of the shop. In the afternoon one day he was hard at work when someone came up from behind and lightly squeezed his arm. He looked up and it was Henry Ford !! Since it was so loud they couldnt speak and be heard , Henry just gave him the thumbs up and off he wandered
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Old 05-01-2018, 07:16 AM   #37
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My story begins before I was born. My father bought this 1930 Ford Tudor new; it was the first car he ever owned. I was brought home from the hospital in this car. The photo shows me in front of the car with my wooden pram on top; Iím 3 or 4 years old.

In December 1938 I cried when he traded the Ford in for this new Plymouth RoadKing because I thought he would not haul my boat on top of it. However, he did haul the boat on top of his brand new car. It is hard to see but that is my mother in the driverís seat.

Robert
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Old 05-01-2018, 01:28 PM   #38
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My story begins before I was born. My father bought this 1930 Ford Tudor new; it was the first car he ever owned. I was brought home from the hospital in this car. The photo shows me in front of the car with my wooden pram on top; Iím 3 or 4 years old.

In December 1938 I cried when he traded the Ford in for this new Plymouth RoadKing because I thought he would not haul my boat on top of it. However, he did haul the boat on top of his brand new car. It is hard to see but that is my mother in the driverís seat.

Robert


good one Robert.
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Old 05-05-2018, 02:29 PM   #39
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In í73 and í74I was spreading fertilizer across farmland in the New England region of NewSouth Wales. On this particular day I landed and taxied up to one big pile ofsuper phosphate.
Along drovethe farmer. He was to give me instructions on where to spread this, applicationrates and any special instructions or requests. Nothing unusual about that. Butwhat was unusual was his ute (pickup to Americans). An A Model. Even as a kid Ialways loved A Models. The only difference now was the fact I was a big kid. WellI was more interested in his motor car than details of his job. Then along camefarmers son. In a Model A. This took my attention until a third son arrived toin a Model A.
Just howmany of these things do you have I asked. 10 was his reply. How come I asked.
He went onto say that each clearing sale that had one listed they attended and bought. Aboutten pound each. They thought that one day they would be valuable. They showedme a Victorian in almost perfect order. Would they sell it to me. No, sorry.
Well I was disappointed.But also pleased with him. He had them all garaged. Out of the weather. I havecome across so many old cars and tractors in the weather where the owners wonítsell and wonít put under cover.
Whilst writingthis now I have decided I might track down that family and communicate withthem. I have 3 Aís. My wife insists that is why we have no money.
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Old 05-05-2018, 03:43 PM   #40
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I may have told this before but here goes.

When I was in high school my friend Steve drove a Model A Closed Cab Pickup to school. His family had a small orange orchard on their property. It was on the side of a hill and the only truck that could go up and down the steep hill to bring down the fruit was the Model A.

We had first period gym and the guys would stand outside the gym before class. One day Steve drove by in his Model A with a broom, that they used to clean the bed, stucking up in bed by the cab. Back in the day, the big thing was to put duel pipes on your car. When he came over, one of the wise guys said "hey Steve, when are you going to get duel broom!" All the guys erupted in laughter.

The next day, Steve drove by with duel brooms stuck in the bed. For the rest of the year, his nick name was "duel brooms."

David Serrano
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Old 05-18-2018, 02:55 PM   #41
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This Model A Story is from my childhood, the years for this story cover probably 1946 to 1949. My dad, a mechanic had owned a Model A Ford since about 1935! The car was the 4 door DeLuxe with 2 wheel wells! (that he never put spare tires in.) and it had a full box trunk on the back that he used to carry water, as we had no plumbing.

From about 1938 on, in Chicago, my dad worked for a lumber company as a mechanic to keep trucks of the day going delivering lumber and bringing in lumber from the Western and Northern States and Canada.

During WWII, a lot of lumber got used for crating for the war effort. Any kind being cut was used, even exotic stuff. After the war, dad got involved with someone who had a lot of crating put together that was no longer needed and they were either going to burn it or they would deliver it to his property. I have never seen such a big stack of wood.

Anyway, my dad had been modifying the model A Ford to allow the place that the crank would be used to start the car to be set up with a pillow block on the bumper with a pinned shaft put into the crank hole, all aligned to drive a wide flat belt. ( the kind that was used on farms with tractors of the day to run wheat grinders and stationary implements of all kinds)

He also had built a high flatbed trailer with a very smooth wood surface, and installed in the very middle a saw arbor that had a large saw blade mounted. I do not remember the size of the blade but, 10x10 lumber pushed thru it you could still see blade. He put a trailer ball on the end of the model a bumper, blocked the trailer with wood to lock it in place installed a long leather flat belt, and then the fun. As a kid I pulled nails every day, and when dad got home he pulled nails from all this crate lumber. Let me tell you, some of this lumber was 8x8x12 or 16 and some was bigger.

Once we had the nails out and he and mom and I had stacked the wood, he set up the trailer saw to cut 2inch lumber. I would sit in the model A Ford, dad would give me the sign to rev it up, and he told me to keep the engine speed constant, once I hit the right speed. That effort went on for weeks. Eventually all the wood was cut into 2x4’s or 2x10’s and he had the lumber to build our home, and he did complete all framing from that lumber.

That old model A Engine, running as a stationary power plant and me, a 9 year old kid being the throttle engineer for my dad, is just something, I will never, never forget!

Today, we as a people in this world are not into this kind of use of a vehicle, as a kid, neighbors that had one, would take off a rear wheel and put on a pully belt and use 1st gear to pump water.

After the effort was completed, my uncle who had a farm in Indiana bought the model A Ford and trailer and drove it to his farm to cut wood there! Never saw the car or trailer again!

Henry built one heck of a vehicle for the world to use to improve life! That is the story!
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Old 05-20-2018, 09:29 AM   #42
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Winnie theblue dog crashes my 28 Tourer
Well I wasboth proud and pleased with my restored 28 A model. It was advertised in theMelbourne newspaper by a local farmer in our area. Had been a paddock basheruntil it wasnít even any good for that. 2K was the asking price and whilst Icouldnít immediately put my hands on that money the farmer agreed he would keepit for me until I could come up with it. There was numerous enquiries fromMelbourne which was 200 miles south.
I had itwell restored costing twice itís market value but I was pleased.
I had a dog,a blue healer cattle dog by the name of Winnie. Winnie had been my daughtersdog. Given to her as a puppy which outgrew its cuteness when it grew into aproper size hound. It was left with us, her parents, on a temporary permanentbasis. I have heard many stories aboutparents inheriting dogs from their kids.
Itís ourpolicy not to have dogs in the house or car. One exception is the Model A.Winnie would sit on the floor only and never miss an opportunity of going whereever it took her.
One thisparticular day, with the car running and parked in our yard, engine running with the driversdoor open ( and itís always been my policy to close car doors) Winnie was not goingto miss this ride. Up she jumped and squeezed between the seat and the gearstick. The gear stick was pushed forward and almost without a crunch was inreverse. I saw this. The staff car chugging backwards and approaching a 3000gallon fuel tank. Well the expected occurred. Crunch. I hadnít made it back tothe vehicle at that moment and here was the staff car held stationary withwheels rotating in the dirt.
I climbedin. Winnie gave me one of those dog smiles to display pleasure. I gave her apat. How could I be pissed with something she did not intend and had no idea ofmy panic and 7 second 100 yard dash.
Fortunatelydamage was minimal and the rear bumper bar had saved the day. She continued herchauffer driven rides and we still loved her.
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Old 05-20-2018, 09:40 AM   #43
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My First A: The Staff Car.


I purchased this from a farmer who lives near Deniliquin which is 40 miles to the east of our town, Tocumwal. In New South Wales (NSW).


There is one commercial business between the towns of Tocumwal. A pub at Blighty. It is the community meeting place for local farmers and others. The pub always has a good and happy atmosphere. They were serving 120 meals each Friday night. Now thatís pretty good for a little farming community.


Now itís patronage has become so small the publican is considering closing. Why? Random Breath Testing. For no good reason it became a target of what is Highway Patrol (I call Highway men). They are the most despicable police in NSW. A police training school is located in Deniliquin and there are cops there with little to do. You know what that leads to donít you.


Well in the town of Deniliquin the locals got sick of them too. So they got even. Cops arrived at a the Federal hotel one evening with no good reason. When they departed there was an awful crunch and a loud scrape. The front axel was detached and laying on the ground just where the vehicle was parked before it reversed out. A chain had been coupled the axel to a large post. The vehicle had reversed out but not the axel.


Not surprisingly they could not find a culprit but they did find a hotel full of jubilant drinkers.

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Old 05-20-2018, 09:46 AM   #44
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I


I picked up my ModelA ute in Yarrawongaand two of my grandkids travelled back with me.They wantedto luncheon at an upmarket out door country location called the‘Olive Grove’.


Well the Olive Grovehad good food,good service and a pleasant vista with farmingequipment aroundand farm animalsgrazing very near by.


Well the financialaspects ran throughmy mind, so when McDonalds came into view I talked theminto a ‘happy meal’.Well with enthusiasm we entered and placed their order,the happy meal plus addons, and for granddad a ham burger and coffee.Price$48.


Price, $48.I don’tknow if it was amore affordable price than the Olive Grove, but thefigures ranthrough my mind.For the three of us we could have each had a cooked chook and2 tall bottles ofbeer for the same money. And it’s not thegreatest culinaryexperience eating atMcDonald’s.



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Old 05-20-2018, 09:08 PM   #45
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I have taken a liking to writing. whilst my aviation stories are not related to my favourite motor car I will post them here. if you don't like them or don't approve just say and I will not post any more. aviation stories that is. here goes.


KhartoumInternational Airport.
In 1977 wehad a drought in Queensland so I worked a cotton season in Sudan, Africa. When an aeroplane service was required weflew into Khartoum. On arrival it was customary to circle the tower before landing. Don’t know why but that's what we did.


One day I didn’t and it wasn’t long before this big black man came and spoke to me.Couldn’t understand a word but when I pointed to the tower I figured I was in trouble.


Yes, I was told, I was a very dangerous pilot. Landed without getting a green verri light.I told the tower man, who spoke good English, that in all the times I landed at Khartoum I had never being given a green verri light and I asked if he would showme. We he messed around in a cupboard and pulled out a mains powered torch with a red light. Please will you show me a green light. Fiddles in the cupboard again and has a green lens in his hand. Screws out the red and inserts the green. But that’s not a green light, that’s half a green light (the lens was broken in about half). He couldn’t produce it and more than 10 minutes had elapsed. I had to write a report on why I was a dangerous pilot.


To depart Khartoum one would taxi to the front of the tower and the controller would step outside and give a wave. One could then depart. One of the pilots was a hardcase Dutchman by the name of Gerard Post. He lied to the controller and said as he was difficult to see he, the controller should wave his handkerchief. (Thecontrollers had hankies infact they were upmarket blokes who had house servants). they had been trained in England. It reminded me all of the movie ‘the magnificent men in their flying machines).


To depart wehad to lodge a flight plan the day before, and before midday otherwise we hadto wait an additional day. This was so the military had time to digest a departing aeroplane and wouldn’t shoot us down. Remember Khartoum is an international airport.


One learned not to have high expectations and not to become anxious about things.
And a foot note. to be trained. that means what monkey sees monkey do. It removes all initiative, character and imagination from monkeys head. strict protocol is to be observed and that is partly the downfall of todays modern workforce. I have taught just a few kids to fly. I always make them think for themselves. I asked them at each manoeuvre what they did correct and what they did wrong and how they would do it next time. As a result my 2 sons became pilots and captains of international airlines, carriers that you all will know. other kids became good cropdusters and have done well.



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Old 05-21-2018, 12:30 PM   #46
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stunning day. August 22, 1956 very sad as Daddy passed and I had to sell the car. August 22, 2017, and the 40Merc came home.

I still thrill almost a year later

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRrfXebA6pI
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Old 05-21-2018, 04:14 PM   #47
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I joined the Navy when I was seventeen, just out of high school, in 1958. When I graduated from boot camp I was assigned to school in Dam Neck, VA (near Virginia Beach). I decided to drive my '30 Tudor down to Virginia from Massachusetts. So, off I went. (No interstates in '58). Ran 50-55 much of the way. BUT, after a while, the generator quit and I was running on just the battery. That was OK as long as I kept the engine running since it wouldn't crank well on a low battery. In those days before the Hampton Roads bridge/tunnel was built, you had to take a ferry across from Kiptopeke (sp) Beach at the end of the DelMarVa peninsula over to Norfolk. You couldn't keep the engine running on the ferry, so she had to be shut down. And, I was one of the first cars on the ferry, so no one behind me could get off until I did. No pressure!! We were allowed to start our cars as the ferry was approaching the slip, so I cranked the old girl by hand and she started right up and off I went. No one the wiser!! When you're a teenager anything is possible!!! An experience I will never forget!!!
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Old 05-22-2018, 02:39 AM   #48
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popular Bob Caldwell


Bob Caldwell was a gentleman. A second generation ag operator in Northern California. It is well documented his dad Byron was one of the very first aerial operators.


Many Australians knew Bob. He married an Australian girl he met whilst on R. & R. whilst serving in Viet Nam. Bob flew each rice season for a local operator in Coleambally NSW and he purchased many aeroplanes for Australian operators including myself.


It is possible to write many chapters on Bob and indeed maybe a whole book, so I’ll try not to run off on a tangent.


Bob flew an Iroquois helicopter in Viet Nam. He was infact shot whilst flying. Alone bullet entered the ear piece of his helmet on the right hand side and made an exit on the left hand side. If Bob did not believe in God at the time Ithink he would have following that shot. For some reason the projectile skirted around the back of the helmet before making the exit.


I can confirm this as I have held the helmet and inspected the entry, track and exit. Difficult to believe? Yes. In the right hand side and out the left. The military stores issued a new helmet and next day returned the damaged one to Bob for him to souvenir.


Sadly Bob’s life ended with prostate cancer when he was only 52.. A propeller stands outside the Coleambally motel where Bob stayed. A memorial to him. His ashes are spread across the rice fields at Coleambally and Williams California.

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Old 05-24-2018, 12:15 PM   #49
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MY FIRST AQUANTENCE WITH A GIRL THAT I LOVE.

In an earlier post I said even as a kid I always admired the Model A. My first drive of one was when I was 16. It was an unloved coupe, sitting out in the weather at my friends family farm near the cow shed.

My friend and I got it started and headed down the road to the pub. About 15 miles away along a busy road. Busy in those days was about 1 vehicle every 5 minutes.
The minimum ageto enter a pub was 21. Our age would have been very obvious to the publican but he must have liked us, or the money, or both.
It took only about half a dozen beers and we were screaming. Then the drive back. When we saw an approaching car I would set the hand throttle, climb out on the running board still steering the car. Just as we were about to come adjacent to this on coming car I would scream and throw out my arm and leg. We made it back okay. If we had been caught both the cop and my parents would have given us a belting.
With my kids I gave them a ute and told them to teach themselves. They seemed to do okay and they too would do errands around our country roads.However I wasn’tsilly enough to let them drive into town. However today with cops that just delight in writing infringements one just has to comply. Stuffy world.
Well my daughter Sarah used to frequent the pub underage. I had a chat to the local sergeant of police who collected her in the police car, took her to the police station where she got a good dressing down. She never went to the pub again. For 3weeks.
And for my friends Model A. Is it still sitting at the cow shed where it was more than 50 years ago. I do hope someone bought it and provided it with TLC.
I have a Model A for 3 of my kids and a early Holden (Australian GM.) for the other. Sadly they haven't shown a lot of interest in them at this stage. Hope that changes.

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Old 05-25-2018, 03:21 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete View Post
My Last Drive.

While out driving around in my model A, I swerved to avoid hitting a deer, lost control and landed in a ditch, severely banging my head.
Dazed and confused I crawled out of the ditch to the edge of the road when a shinny new convertible pulled up with a very beautiful woman who asked, "Are you okay?"
As I looked up, I noticed she was wearing a low cut blouse with cleavage to die for...
"I'm okay I think," I replied as I pulled myself up to the side of the car to get a closer look.
She said, ďGet in and Iíll take you home so I can clean and bandage that nasty scrape on your head.Ē
"That's nice of you," I answered, but I don't think my wife will like me doing that!
"Oh, come now, Iím a nurse," she insisted. "I need to see if you have any more scrapes and then treat them properly."
Well, she was really pretty and very persuasive. Being sort of shaken and weak, I agreed, but repeated, "I'm sure my wife won't like this."
We arrived at her place which was just few miles away and, after a couple of cold beers and the bandaging, I thanked her and said, "I feel a lot better but I know my wife is going to be really upset so I'd better go now."
"Don't be silly!" she said with a smile, while unbuttoning her blouse exposing the most beautiful set of boobs Iíve ever seen. "Stay for a while. She won't know anything. By the way, where is she?"
"Still in the ditch with my model A, I guess."


ever thought of writing a book Pete? It would sell well. cheers, gary
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Old 05-25-2018, 06:25 PM   #51
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MY TASMANIAN TOUR IN THE UTE AND TOURER.

My crop dusting buddy, Wayne Cowan, is an operator in central northern Victoria. He runs anAirtractor and a Thrush. His son Andrew is now flying in the business. Wayne mainly loads these days with Andrew flying.

Wayne had a visit by two C.A.S.A. inspectors. Both these no brain, clip board, university graduating inspectors who had just starting to shave had exactly nought experience of ag.operations. They told Wayne they didn’t like his attitude. This didn’t bode well of course nor did it lead to a great conversation and thus report.
Each operatoris required to nominate a ‘chief pilot’ to be responsible for the pilots and operation. Well Wayne had this office revoked. It didn’t bother him greatly. But I have gone off at a tangent to my story.
Wayne called and invited me to take a tour of Tasmania. He with his Ford Mustang and me in my A ute (pickup) and A tourer (phaeton). My younger brother Michael and numerous friends came. By the end of the 8 day event attendees got to know my name. By the end of day 1 everyone knew Michael. He is gregarious.

It was a great rally and the most memorable aspects were the interest shown in the A’s by the oldies. I would take them for a ride and it would have been a memorable event for them. Some of them took the vehicles for a drive. I am not protective about my cars. They were a heap of junk when I purchased them and any mishap could be repaired. People are always hesitant in driving them for fear of damaging them.

Another pleasing aspect I had was giving kids at rally points a ride. They would pile in or ride on the running boards. I would drive in low gear very slowly. They too would remember it for years.

Tassy wasgreat. In some ways it’s a step back to the ’50’s. Locals are relaxed and well mannered. Tassy was also known as Van Deemans Land. In the 1800’s the English dumped their convicts there. To be a descendent was shameful until maybe 30years ago when it became a status. Well my g.g.g. grandfather ended there plus my g.g. grandmother. Theft in both cases. When I am in England, which is not frequent, I thank god that they were thieves and thank the magistrate who transported them.


The only disagreement I had was when I was about to drive on the ferry to cross Bass Strait and get home. An official wanted any materials I had which were flammable.I told her no, she was not getting it. She became argumental and at last demanded to know what I had. A bottle of whiskey I told her. Conversation ended in a friendly manner.
What a great trip. The only mechanical breakdown was one flat tyre.


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Old 05-27-2018, 05:14 PM   #52
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Mouse Hunter.


John Lynch was an accomplished pilot and aeroplane builder. He also built perspex canopies for aeroplanes and gliders.
John was a hermit. Lived alone just out of our town of Tocumwal NSW. His property was about 30 acres with an airstrip from which he flew his aeroplane and glider. His front gate was padlocked. I entered by way of landing and taxing up to his door. I enjoyed a chat with him.
John once bragged about his shooting expertise. He says he could shoot a mouse at an incredible distance ‘off the hip’. He became known as the great white mousehunter or mouse hunter for short.
One day a pilot by the name of Terry Walsh and I were flying around in a Beaver. The flight controls are on the left of course but the pole could be flipped to the right. But not the rudder pedals. Here I was flying from the right with the pole and Terry from the left, the pilot seat, with the pedals.
I said lets stop by and say goodday to Mouse Hunter. Everything went normal until touch down. We shot off to the left, over corrected then to the right. And again and again. Big over corrections. Mouse Hunter who was watching this shot off behind his house to avoid being sliced up by the prop just like a loaf of bread. We eventually stopped with propeller turning just where John had been standing.
That night I washed my own underwear so as to avoid my secret getting out.

Conclusion ofthe story. The brain that controls the pole must also be the brain that controls the pedals.

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Old 05-29-2018, 02:16 AM   #53
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William the Conqueror 1066
When I wasin primary school we learned history. I can recall how frequently we weretaught ĎWilliam the Conqueror, 1066í. I havenít forgotten.
But whatwasnít told to me was just who this William was. I did learn however, at theage of about 60. He was a Frenchman who invaded England and had a scrap withthe poms. He, the frog, in his 21 year reignnever learned to speak English and so new words were introduced. We continuemany of these words today. William never learned to speak English and a gobblegook language was born. This did wear off over years and it could have beenhundreds of years. Except. Except one surviving western industry still usesthis stupid language. The legal industry. Thatís why it is almost impossible totranslate legal jargon to simple everyday easy to understand English.
In 1968 Ilearned to become an agricultural pilot. Amongst the pesticides we used was afamily called Ďorganic phosphatesí. Quite toxic. If poisoned by ingestion onewas to take orally Ďipecac syrup. At times when spraying insects out bush Ialways gave thought to where our closest supplier of ipecac syrup might belocated. Pharmacist or hospital and time it would take to acquire some. Somelocations were more than two hours drive away.
It took atleast 40 years of curiosity to get to the bottom of why this treatment?
Ipecac syrupinduces vomiting. Why the hell didnít these instructors tell us that years ago?We always filled the correct answer in any exam papers we were required to sit.
Two hoursdrive to get this stuff? Two fingers down a victims neck would have providedthe same outcome. Preferably someone elseís fingers. But never the less.
William theConqueror. Ipecac Syrup. To think these teachers and instructors were paid toprovide useless information.
It ispossible that today these people are in industry, carrying clip boards wearingyellow high vis vests and welding considerable authority and acting with superiority.Many of them with CASA.

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Old 05-29-2018, 02:27 PM   #54
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Good day Model A fans.
I have enjoyed writing these stories and reading other owners tales too.
I have gotton a bit away from the A stories and gone to aviation stories, 5 consecutive I see. whilst I have many more I can tell, it is time for someone else to have a go. So lets hear some. Please.
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Old 05-29-2018, 11:14 PM   #55
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Reprinted from Henry's Horn, the newsletter of Henry's A's Model A club, Livermore, CA
From the Drivers Seat (Because I'm the President)
Dave Mc Arthur - Danville, California - Daveymc29@aol.com
Chapter 1 - The trip to Addison
Well here we are in Addison and will be looking forward to having a fun week and an uneventful trip home, via Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, Utah and Nevada, with the last mad dash from Fallon on the 5th of July if all goes as scheduled.
This was how the trip Started, ten miles from home, at the top of an overpass the left front wheel departed, never to be seen again.
Initially there was the problem of a six wheel roadster
insisting that five wheels are plenty. Unfortunately the
one it chose to throw off was the left front. Fortunately I
had a Jack. Unfortunately it wouldn't lift the axle high
enough to put a tire on. Fortunately I have a bride.
Unfortunately she was home in bed. Fortunately I had a
cell phone and she could bail me out with another jack.
Now with two jacks, I could put on a spare tire and be
on my way, all be it an hour later than planned. The
errant wheel has yet to turn up, though I suspect it is
directly below the flyover at Hwy 680 and Hwy 580.
That was where it headed and I didn't want to watch it as I was steering to a stop, a tad apprehensively, and amid a shower of sparks that would have started a grass fire, had I been out on the road. But luck had me on the highest part of the flyover.
Hot over the Tehachapi's, but the little car pulled that fine. Once out in the Mohave at Kramer Junction, running on the two lane out of where 395 and 58 cross, the points did their diminishing clearance trick. Once up to speed they bounce enough to let me cruise on into Barstow, but then it was all popping and backfiring into the Motel lot. Gapped them out a bit and all was well.
The next day was fun exploring the wild and exciting city of Barstow, then off to Oatman to see a burro. I had a pal leading the way and we both stopped at Golden Shores for some fuel. I barely made it up the hill into Oatman.
Street scene in Oatman Arizona, wild donkeys come into town for a handout from the tourists. Carrots can be purchased at the store.
Page - 1 -
On old Hwy 66, Cool Springs Station, AZ. Closed today
After leaving Oatman, the car did fine until we got back to Hwy 40. I managed to get it to wind up on the highway and we got to Kingman. There we put on another distributor and left with full power. Five miles later it was again running poorly and after nursing it for an hour with no noticeable improvement, I was on the trailer into Williams. By now I was running on my third distributor, second coil and frustration. The next morning I drove off to the Grand Canyon and it ran rather well most of the way there. Then lots of popping and backfiring. Steve Lewis put his spare carburetor on and away I went to the Canyon. Sort of. We got there but the popping and snorting was back and no power.
By now I was thoroughly frustrated and out of ideas, but as a mild exhaust leak had now turned into straight pipes we changed the manifold gasket, had to double up to stop the leak, but it ran fine back to Williams. Then it did the pop, snap, buck thing so I backed out the mixture control and it improved. We cleaned the carburetor and tightened wires and got back to my original distributor and carburetor and it ran okay. Not perfect, but okay. In Gallup, NM we took the ammeter wires off one of the studs and tightened the stud.
In Santa Rosa, New Mexico, a lady advised us of pending hail and tornado warnings on the way to Tucumcari, NM. We braved the weather and were rewarded with smooth sailing though it did appear threatening. All turned out sunny and dry in Tucumcari.
That seems to have me running like I should and I did so
well into Tucumcari that the next morning I took off on
my own for Amarillo and an old fashioned biscuits and
gravy, sausage and bacon, eggs and fixins breakfast at
Nelda's cousins. (For those that don't know, Nelda is my
bride of 50 years.) Then drove to Quanah where I met
the rest of the group. Now we are safely in Addison and
will be checking out the convention. This all sounds
bad, and it would have been except for the wonderful folks I'm traveling with. They still are talking to me so I guess they haven't totally lost patience with me yet. So I'll test them on the way home.
Thanks to Roger Griffith and Bill Miller, Nelda has sent me some spares for the trip home.
Page - 2 -
Chapter 2 - Addison and the Return Trip Home
By now you've all read of my wonderful start and the trip to Addison. It was a lot like the Marine Corps boot camp. Looking back it was a lot of fun and challenges met. At the time it was a lot of frustration and grief. But how about the event and the trip home, you ask?
The first day in Addison I got settled into my room, met a few of the folks staying in my hotel from various states and with various cars. Seems a lot were from Indiana and Iowa. Most were just there to observe things but one guy from Oregon was busy making his car ready for Touring class judging. I believe he must have topped his classification as he scored 486 points. I also walked to the International Hotel and got the lay of things. My main concern was to find the repair tent and compare it to Reno or Lodi. Then I ambled off in search of good Tex-Mex.
Second day I went to the time trials put on by F.A.S.T. Some real driving and fast cars at the time trials in Addison. This lady can make her machine fly.
I saw some real displays of racing skills and some hot machines. Went to the repair area and changed my oil and greased a few fittings. Then went in search of vendors to replenish my friends parts supplies, of those pieces I had put on my car.
Met up with some friends for dinner and a movie in a park the third day. None of us stayed for the movie, but the hot dogs and hamburgers were great.
Next I went to the Dallas Book Depository and heard the story of Kennedy and Oswald again. Also went to an Air and Flight Museum.
Snoopy's Sopworth Camel at the flight museum in Addison.
Another trip was to the Forth Worth Stockyards and the place that prints much of our money for the Federal Reserve. Had another shot at the Tex-Mex. Spent a good part of the rest of the time wandering and looking at the cars. We were never allowed to see the top cars up close. One could view them from above, over a balcony rail.
Nelda joined me and we wandered some more. We also went to her cousin's in Hurst for a night. That was right after we did the three laps on the Texas Speedway and then changed our distributor for the umpteenth time because the backfiring had people ducking for cover.
Page - 3 -
We started early on our return and drove up to Clinton, OK. Another of Nelda's cousins came over from OK. City and we took him through the Hwy 66 Museum there. Another meal and off the next morning to Fairview, OK.
Some of the many steam and gasoline tractors A fine collection of race car bits and pieces and other machines in Fairview, Oklahoma In Fairview
There we visited a machine shop, farm, airport, racecar builder and whatever. The older man restores tractors his wife makes quilts. The son builds and restores race machines. We also were fed fritters and good things of every sort. All too soon we were again on the road into Garden City Kansas. There we hit Hwy 50 for our journey home on America's Loneliest Road. (Actually that part is in Nevada.)
The next day we took off early and drove over to Pueblo, CO, and stopped for lunch. I have a sister fifty miles away, so we decided to drive up to Colorado Springs and see her. While we ate lunch our condenser sat out there cooking and when we got back to the car it had no intention of going to Colorado Springs, so we nursed it into Canon City and I finally fixed the backfiring for good. I put on a complete distributor Roger Griffith had rebuilt and also put the cover back on my manifold heater. But by the time I got all this done it was late and so we went to dinner and spared my sister unexpected company.
29 Smile, my little roadster, at 11,312 foot Monarch Pass, in CO. You ask "Why 29 Smile?" Because that is the license.
I bought the car from Alan Funt and he had Smile 29, he had told me I could use it, then after I bought it changed his story, so I got 29 Smile.
I also still have his Smile 29, just in case I can ever us it.
Page - 4 -
Two of us at the 11,312 foot summit of Monarch Pass in Colorado.
Morning found us driving up the Arkansas River and over Monarch pass and down into Gunnison, Co. Great breakfast and a great museum where we spent several hours.
The ride out of Gunnison, CO took us past this beautiful lake, on our way to Grand Junction.
Our stop for the night was Grand Junction. There I discovered a slight drip in my "leakless" water pump. Within minutes I had a spare in hand and proceeded to put it on. With my six bladed fan on it there was no way to turn it. So off it came and back on with the leaky leakless.
Parked overlooking the San Rafael Swell, a 35 by 70 mile stretch of rocky residue from oceans of the past with deep, narrow canyons and high rock cliffs. It's a beautiful bit of country and very dangerous to those that get off the main road without proper maps or a guide. Also food and water are required. A local guide is advised.
Next we drove over to Delta, UT. It's a beautiful spot to have some Tex-Mex and then kick back. A friend supplied me with a water pump and I put it on in twenty minutes. Did a test run and the leak was history.
Page - 5 -
Morning again found us pulling a grade out of Delta, on our way to Ely, NV. Near the top the new pump began to scream at me to stop, so I did. The repair truck was a few minutes behind us so I changed back to the leaker and was just in time for the repair driver to help me a-fix the hood and off to Eli, determined to just add water from now on. In Eli we took a train out to the massive copper mine that is in Ruth. One of the largest open pit mines, they say. It is over 900 feet deep. Then back past the brothel, where one of the ladies was out waving at the train and telling us, "Ya'all come on down."
From Eli to Fallon was our next drive, and Fallon was our last night out. 4th of July and no Fireworks. No gunfire and I doubt anything else happened that was worthy of note. The next morning we all went our separate ways home. We stopped in Carson City for breakfast and got home about 1:00 pm All in all, a very memorable trip.
I learned that a manifold heater is a good thing in cold weather and a very bad thing when it is 100 degrees plus. They are also worse with the cover off than they are with the cover on. Also it is okay to back the fuel mixture screw out if you are experiencing slight vapor lock, even in high altitudes. At some points mine ran best backed out 2 1/2 turns. At others it had to be all the way seated. Even modern point condensers will malfunction if exposed to enough heat for long enough. I used up two before I got wise and replaced the cover on the heater. I also folded aluminum foil and stuck it between the heater cover and the distributor, several layers.
Also learned that "leakless" water pumps aren't leakless, and it only takes 15 minutes to remove and replace a water pump, if you practice enough times. Leaving more than half your spare parts at home is not a plus. Having a "quick fix" sort of tool set consisting of a screwdriver, a test light, 1/2," 9/16," a pair of pliers, feeler gauge, gloves, flashlight and a small crescent wrench is a great time saver. You don't need to carry a starter, just a crank, but a generator is a good thing to have along. Someone else may need one.
Dave Mc Arthur
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Old 05-31-2018, 04:16 PM   #56
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

There is one quote I never miss the opertunity to drop.

You are discussing with a farmer the paddock to spray. Farmer informs you that pilot“Jack” sprays this way or pilot Jack does things this or that way. Farmer has chucked you a challenge because Jack pleases the farmer. I’ll make the point by an example.
Sometime in the early 80’s I was to spray cereal for the late Allan Hawkins at Tocumwal. The paddock had a kidney shaped lagoon on the north and Allan asked if I could start at the lagoon , working south maintaining the curve I’d track on the first run. Continue to fly the curve. Well I’m not that good but I can maintaina straight line between the markers, starting with two short runs, getting longer until they meet.
Well that didn’t seem to please Allan and he informed me the last bloke I’d sent there could maintain a curve, and in this very same paddock. “who was he I enquired.”Came from Victoria somewhere in Gippsland.
Maybe, I said, Bob Landsbury.
“Yes, yes, that’s the bloke” Allan responded.
Now here comes my punch line. And I love to quote it.
“but Bob’s a much better pilot than me”.
It just kills the farmers point of view and generally ends with a laugh or chuckle from the farmer.

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Old 06-01-2018, 09:46 AM   #57
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

My first Model A story ends sadly. I bought a '28 roadster in 1954 from a young lady who had inherited it from her grandfather who was the original owner. It was in solid condition but had been brush painted red and had 17" wire wheels. It ran well and I owned it for about two years. Once I tried to find out how fast it would go and the engine blew a rod through the pan and destroyed the block. Sears was selling rebuilt short blocks for $35.00 so I went to Sears on South Main in Houston. Lucky me, they were closing them out and three were left for $5.00 each. I bought one and three of us got the car running again in about three hours using a chain and a person on each end of a 2x4. When I decided to sell the car in order to buy a '32 Model B pickup, an acquaintance offered me $100 for it which is what it originally cost me. The sad thing is that he decided to make a hotrod out of it and cut off the fenders and completely dismantled the car. While that was going on he joined the navy and I never heard from him or found what happened to the car.
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Old 06-01-2018, 02:45 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert/Texas View Post
My first Model A story ends sadly. I bought a '28 roadster in 1954 from a young lady who had inherited it from her grandfather who was the original owner. It was in solid condition but had been brush painted red and had 17" wire wheels. It ran well and I owned it for about two years. Once I tried to find out how fast it would go and the engine blew a rod through the pan and destroyed the block. Sears was selling rebuilt short blocks for $35.00 so I went to Sears on South Main in Houston. Lucky me, they were closing them out and three were left for $5.00 each. I bought one and three of us got the car running again in about three hours using a chain and a person on each end of a 2x4. When I decided to sell the car in order to buy a '32 Model B pickup, an acquaintance offered me $100 for it which is what it originally cost me. The sad thing is that he decided to make a hotrod out of it and cut off the fenders and completely dismantled the car. While that was going on he joined the navy and I never heard from him or found what happened to the car.

I can tell of a disgraceful tale of my behaviour. As a kid we had a 26 Chrysler 'doctors special' which had been purchased new by my grandfather. It was stored in a machinery shed with tractors and our family car was an Austin A40 which was badly rusted out because we also used it on farm and it picked up much cow shit.
Anyway, I used to drive the Chrysler in and out of the shed using the starter motor. It was 6V of course.
Dad could never understand why it always had a flat battery. Eventually it became junk and was towed out into the weather. The engine was removed and installed in a speed boat as a temporary engine. The vehicles was towed to the rubbish tip and we shot it full of holes with a 22 rifle.
I do feel sad about this now, but at the time, nearly 60 years ago, the vehicle had no value. We were all short sighted weren't we.
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Old 06-01-2018, 03:26 PM   #59
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I worked onthe Darling Downs for 5 years, based at Miles which is about mid-way between Dalby and Roma. Enjoyed most everything about it with the exception that seasons / rainfall was unreliable. When, one season, drought became prolonged my employer asked us all to see if we could get some outside employment to tide us all through. Gary went to Sudan in North Africa and sprayed cotton in an area known as the Gazera.
Khartoum was the capital and when in town we stayed at the Excelsior Hotel. Whilst Sudan was a dry state some hotels had bars. It has since changed to totally dry. Well one day I walked into the bar and here’s a bloke dressed a bit like an Australian farmer and wearing a straw hat.
I said ‘goodday’ and he said like a beer. Of course I accepted, we conversed and the blokes name was John McKeechie, an ag pilot from Victoria. A well known fellow who was well known for his funny antics.
About 15years later he flew a rice season for me. Sometimes we talked about our times, good and bad, in Sudan. Here is one of John’s stories.


The previous year he was ferrying back to UK a Pawnee and experienced engine trouble in north Libya. He figured landing in Libya undesirable but more desirable than landing in the Mediterranean. John landed near Tripoli infact at or near the well known war graves site. He was confronted byseveral armed military men and marched away to a military site. Here he was spoken to by a high ranking military official and still surrounded by armed men. He was frightened and said he was infact shaking. The high ranking man asked why he was shaking and John gave a very clever answer.
“I don’tknow if you are bad men and will shoot me or you are good people and will help me he said”.
Well no one wants to be bad and the military man put his arms around John’s shoulders and said, ‘we are good people’. John has set himself up well and was given assistance. He returned the aeroplane back to England.
Goodthinking John.





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Old 06-02-2018, 07:09 PM   #60
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Coota’s fly through shed episode.

Well Coota couldn’t resist it. Flew the Airtractor through a big shed at Ravenswood on the west side of Hay. And for good measure he turned and did it again.
No great feat, but had everyone talking. Bickley, who was the manager at Finley for the operator wanted him fired. Bickley couldn’t even start an aeroplane but considered himself to be an authority.
After a while of this silly talk I called the boss man of the company and told him that I too would fire Coota. That is if he couldn't fly through the shed.
That killed all the silly self appointed adjudicators.

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Old 06-03-2018, 03:59 PM   #61
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Is your job repetitious?
Some years back I had my two hip joints replaced. The fellow who performed the job was like all surgeons in so far as he was a well qualified doctor, well trained and well experienced as well up in the higher branches of the money tree for which I have no envy or resentment.
Surgeon did one patient in morning, followed by morning tea, then another and had dinner,then another and had afternoon tea, then another and called it a day. That’s four a day. That’s all he did. Very repetitious.
For much ofthe year my job could be repetitious too. I would takeoff in the morning about daylight, turn left and head out to farms I was about to spray with various pesticides or spread fertilizer or sow rice seed in the spring. I’d return in the evenings after treating a number of paddocks which varied in size from 50 to maybe 300 acres.
One morning,shortly after takeoff I was thinking my job too was repetitious. It was how ever not boring. I saw an excavator down below, digging a wide channel. It was owned and driven by a well know personality by the name of John Robertson.
When I returned that evening I made of point of checking on Robbo who was still working away. He had moved some 50 yards.
Realisation came to me. My job was pretty good. Not as repetitious as the surgeon who replaced my hips or Robbo’s digging a big channel. That made me pretty pleased about things.

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Old 06-04-2018, 04:30 PM   #62
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Gary offends Guest Workers.
I was spreading fertilizer off a strip at Senai in southern peninsula Malaysia, it’s just north of Singapore. This was in about the mid ’90s.
Usually the fertilizer was trucked in bulk but on occasions in bags, sometimes small 50 kg (1 cwt) bags. At such times a team of “guest workers” arrived to decant it.
This story isof one such occasion. The guest workers were Indonesians.
I should have started this story with a quick introduction of the Malaysian language. One would give a greeting, just like we do, in the morning, afternoon and evening.The greeting would be prefixed by the word “selamat” meaning greeting of course.In the morning it was selamat pagi.
So, me being polite gave each of these Indo’s a greeting selamat pagi.
My offsider,also a guest worker, a Tamal from Sri Lanka named Ragoo comes to me and says
Mr Gary, viyyu tork like tviss? You make them vverry aangri.
What did Isay?
Cannot say MrGary, they vverry aangri.
So I return to the labourers and yes they were sullen. Very sullen. But one old Chinese bloke who was driving a backhoe was besides himself. In stitches.
It took me awhile to get to the bottom of this. My Malaysian language skills weren’t so very good.
I was not saying selamat pagi but I was saying selamat pookie. It turns out pookie means vagina. But it gets worse. It really means a vulgar name for vagina starting with a “C”.
I was walking around saying greetings C to all of them. Yeh, that made them vverri aanggari.

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Old 06-05-2018, 04:28 PM   #63
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What goes around, comes around.
Some 40,000 Piper Cubs were built starting in 1938 andfinishing in 1994. So long as aeroplanes exist so will the Cub. The forerunner was the Taylorcraft, first flying in 1932and powered by a 28hp engine. It was said to be underpowered and a 38hp enginewas installed. That was said to be overpowered. Through the production period the power was increased in increments to 150hp. They are now re-engined to180hp and used both privately and commercially all around the world andparticularly in Alaska. At Anchorage airport up to one third of light aeroplanes are Cubs.I found it curious that very few aeroplanes were hangared. I was told the UV radiation was low but they mostly were hangared in the winter when most did not fly.
Aeroplane registration in Australia is prefixed by the letters VH followed by a dash then three letters. The call sign is the 3 letters following the VH.
My son Dennis Mexted had a Piper Cub registered VH-MGN and thus it’s call sign is Mike Golf November.
Dennis is married to Kathy Whitty. Whitty by name and whitty by nature. So Kathy called the aeroplane not Mike Golf November but “Mexted Going Nowhere”.
Recently Dennis traded the plane for a Cessna 180. Just by chance the rego is VH-WGN. And what does Dennis call it?
Whitty Going Nowhere.
What goes around comes around.
I endeavoured to download a picture however this site is just too complex for my simple computer skills.
footnote. well after much endeavour I got the picture on.
No I didn't. It took place of my model a with Woofa. I change it tomorrow.


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Old 06-05-2018, 05:53 PM   #64
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

testing my computer learning ability. I want a user cp.
let's see.


Just like Professor Higgins said. "I think she's (he in this case) got it.
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Old 06-06-2018, 04:04 PM   #65
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

GOOD ADVISE BILL

CASA is our Civil Aviation and Safety Authority. It is deception that they be called safety authority because their pilots have had nearly as many crashes as I have had hot breakfasts. Many had come from the military and they were impractical and authoritive. At 70 I can bag CASA without fear of any reprisals from nasty little upstarts. My pilot licence renewal is about due and I intend to retire so CASA can stick it where the sun don’t shine.



Bill Scott was a CASA ag pilot examiner and an ex military man. I must commend him because he never had crashed an aeroplane. Not a popular fellow in our industry however I got along with him well. He was man enough that one could speak bluntly with him. Bill gave me a piece of information that turned out useful and I enjoy passing it onto others.

Public servants and bureaucrats may write and demand explanations. They are expecting a reply in writing and when you respond they’ve gotcha. What they can’t deal with is those who don’t reply .

I received a letter from a high ranking authority. A powerful government department . They enquired as to which contractors erected a substantial building on my property. I didn’t answer. My accountant said I wouldn’t get away with it. Well they wrote a second, a third, a forth, a fifth and a sixth and then they went away. They didn’t bother me any more.

Another pilot I know received a letter from a lowly government official demanding an explanation. At my advise (originating fromBill) I advised him not to respond. He didn’t. Following yet another demand he received a phone call asking him to respond. He said he had no intention of writing but invited the bureaucrat to come and talk to him. Of course the bureaucrat didn’t and the whole matter faded into the thin air.

Good advise. Thankyou Bill.

Likewise, if you have a complaint to make to a government department you must do it in writing. A verbal complaint goes no further when the conversation ends. An emailed copy is acknowledged electronically upon receipt by a department. Then receipt cannot be denied.

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Old 06-06-2018, 05:12 PM   #66
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

I would respond to this posting but I have beed advised not to.
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Old 06-07-2018, 03:57 PM   #67
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Robbie and Paul Brennan.


During wet winters,many telephone orders include the statement “got my boom bogged”. Well those are good and profitable years foraeroplane operators. But it comes with a problem. If the ground is wet, so are the airstrips.


For years in the Oakland and Jerilderie areas I had 2 roads which I flew off and this saved the crops of many farmers.


Well my friend Robby had a similar situation. In the Carrathool area he too used a road.


In Finley there is a husband and wife vet team. Paul and Di Brennan. They both drive little green Subaru wagons. It goes without saying they blend in nicely with winter growth when the whole country side is green.


Well Robbie is making a landing but the aeroplane won’t settle. This would have been a little confusing. But then a little green car shoots out from the trailing edge of the wing. Of course this give Robbie a fright, he does a go around, asks his driver to stop the vehicle. Robbie lands, sits on the wheel to recover from his fright and recover his composure.


The driver was Paul Brennan, the vet from Finley. He too got a fright. Said he recently had a blowout and said he had figured he had a double blowout. Otherwise he was fairly light hearted.


The aeroplane wheel touched down on the right side of the roof, it slid down the pillar between thefront and rear windows, ran along the shoulder, jumped the side mirror, ran along the right side of the bonnet about which time Robbie applied power.


I heard about this 2days later. I knew the Brennans well and chatted to them. I assured them Robbie would pay for the repairs to their vehicle. I was keen to quell the potential of bad publicity to our industry.


Di Brennan came back and said the repair cost was $500 and she felt it wouldn’t be right to ask Robbie for that. I assured them that the cost was quite acceptable and assured them again Robbie would pay.


The Brennans now have a practice in Nurmurkah in Northern Vic. I saw Di a weeks ago and she said they still had the vehicle. The incident happened in the early ‘80’s and at the time of this writing means 38 years ago.


I always figured the reason Paul didn’t get it repaired was it had become the central conversation piece when he arrived at a farm. Paul would lean on his car, the farmer would walk across and the opening remarks from Paul were, bet you don’t know how these dents got here. He tells the story frequently and is tells it well. He is getting quite good at telling it.


Well the story doesn’tend there. The Griffith aero club has an annual wings presentation dinner. They called Robbies home to ensure Robbie would attend. A presentation was to be made to him they said. Robbies wife Valorie felt pride and importance so off the both went. I reckon Robbie knew what was coming. Well then comes first prize for the biggest fool of the year.The trophy was a dunny seat. Well of course it was presented to Robbie. Val was indignant.

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Old 06-08-2018, 05:23 PM   #68
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Flying for Graham.

The spring was idle with just nothing to spray. However in the Riverina rice was sown and aeroplanes were busy. I went to the town of Tocumwal and worked for a colourful character by the name of Graham George. I had a love / hate relationship withGraham. The love was some fun and funny times we had and the hate was frustration and failure in his management and organisation.
Well Graham could fly and I didnít understand why he was hiring a pilot when he could fly himself. He spoke about getting an ag rating ( endorsement on his pilot licenceto conduct agricultural flying). With that I made the assumption he had acommercial pilot licence which gave him the right to fly professionally. That is to make a living from flying.
Some months after returning to Queensland my brother in law phoned and spoke of an aeroplane crash at Tocumwal. Well I phoned our CASA and asked them if theycould check and see who it was and assuming it was Graham, was there any complications.
It took only5 minutes for them to call back and say yes. Graham didnít have a pilot licence and he didnít have an operators licence either. They did believe however he had a drivers licence and they did know that he was in an ambulance enroute to Mooroopna hospital.
I decided I should take the 850 mile trip south and see him. Beside he hadnít paid me for 3 months work. This needed to be talked about.
Fuel was inextremely short supply. Unions had gone on strike. I decided to hitch hike.Road transports were still running because they probable had fuel in storage.
So I did just that. Hitch hiked. Two days later I met with Graham in Mooroopna hospital and we had a very funny meeting anddiscussion. Graham had humour and could turn a Dracula story to a fun story just like you would see on Disneyland.
This story is too long to continue in one episode and the funny story will continue tomorrow. It is funny.
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Old 06-08-2018, 05:31 PM   #69
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

the Graham story will continue Monday Australian time. g




Disregard the above. g
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Old 06-08-2018, 08:08 PM   #70
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A story with a picture. This is from 4 days ago. When my girls were growing up (b 1980, 81, 83) I bought a '29 roadster out of a barn in Lake Tahoe. It had been the camp car at a girls camp up there since 1932. Bought from the son of the original owner.

The motor was stuck but we took the head off and loosened things up and put it back together. On it's maiden voyage (1988) my middle girl, 7 yrs old said, Dad does this car run on wood. There was a distinct smell of wood smoke coming from the muffler. After a few good backfires, the rats nest and pine nuts were dislodged. I didn't restore it. It was just as it was, the last time they had used it at the camp. Duties included bringing firewood home in the rumble during those mid years so it was a little tired looking but, pleasantly so.

We had lovely family outings and memories in that car. My 3 girls gave me back 6 boys. And it was about 5 years ago that they started pestering me to get another model A. They wanted the grandsons to have some of the same experiences they had loved. Of course I said; "You're killing me." And about 5 minutes later found this roadster up on the top coast of California on a ranch.

Now it's doing it's duty, this picture was taken last monday out on "Mud Lake" east and south of Tonopah. We drove down in the cool of evening as the sun was setting. Extremely rough 4WD road, about 13 miles down to the dry lake. Shift a thousand times, and one particularly bad ditch that would have broken the axle immediately if there was a bowtie on the front instead of an oval. She's a digger, and out we came again without much trouble.

The silence and beauty of that dry lakebed in the middle of nowhere is just incredible. The car is bonnie gray, but the late hour, sun had been down for 20 minutes, turned it this beautiful color. We made it home fine with headlamps glowing. My 14 year old and 7 year old grandsons, Rowan and Oliver were along for the adventure, with their mom, my middle girl, Tina. That's Oliver in the rumble seat. In one of the most beautiful places on earth, looking at an I-pad.
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Old 06-09-2018, 02:44 AM   #71
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The story continues from yesterday.
Working inthe Riverina. I wanted to return home to Western Queensland for Christmas. To get home was a 3 hour drive to Melbourne airport, a 2 hour flight and a 5 hour drive to my town of Miles. The return could be short so long as I had Christmas day with my wife and kids.
On Christmas eve Graham drove me to Melbourne. Passing by the town of Numurkah we spotted a cop on the other side of the road, writing out a ticket for some unfortunate woman. We continued, exceeding the speed limit. Graham thought he was too important in his BMW for the policeman to chase. But alas the policeman did and Graham got himself a ticket.
About two months later, back working in Queensland my brother in law called and spoke ofan aeroplane crash in Tocumwal. Well you know the story, yesterdays story.
Well I took a trip to Mooroopna hospital to see Graham. Here he was with his legs in the air, attached to cords with weights. Legs spread. Just like one sees in cartoon sketches.
We had agreat time telling jokes, telling of past times. I guess we told some lies too.Well Graham tells me he has had 7 shits in the last 10 days. I ask if he counts them and he says yes.
It’sembarrassing Gary he says. I hold on till my cheeks (facial) swell then yell for a nurse who does the necessary. God it’s humiliating.
During the afternoon he says Gary, I must show you this. He rolls with great discomfort to a bed side table and retrieves a letter. It’s from the Victorian Commissionerof Police. It goes something like this.
Dear Mr George. It is a privilege for you to drive in Victoria on an interstate licence. You have been charged with speeding and we hereby revoke that privilege. You are banned for a period of 3 months.
Graham laughs and that hurts his rib cage. He really is in pain.
I can’t evenwipe my arse let alone drive he says. He continues to laugh. It is really very funny.
I enjoy spending the day with him. He is funny and has more front than Myers department stores.
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Old 06-09-2018, 05:35 AM   #72
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Duane's down wind landing.
My spring work is rice sowing followed closely by spraying for insects and weeds. It's the busiest time of the year and required the help of two additional pilots. I hired Duane Switzer and David Salter. I was fortunate that I could call on 2 very experience pilots. Between the 3 of us we had a little more than 70 thousand hours flying.
Springtime has some terrible weather. Cold fronts pass through continually sometimes as frequently as 1 every 5 days. Winds reach gale force and at times we are compelled to work in high winds. Up to 30 knots. Find an airstrip into wind, land, load and takeoff without turning the aeroplane around. It is not possible to turn it around on the ground. Fly the seed in spreading one way only.
All this because rice seed has been wet and germinated. it is growing. If left unsown it becomes matted. It is then disposed of. Costly and in the interim the paddy water gets sour and establishment of the new crop is slow.
One such windy day David and I had returned to base then along comes Duane. From the south west with 30 knots of wind behind him. He flys past the strip, turns and lands into wind. When he walked in I simply commented. Couldn't handle a strait in Duane? Well he returns of the plane, cranks, takesoff, does a 180 and lands down wind at horrendous speed. He wasn't going to get put down.
Now Duane is an interesting bloke. Lives on 3 continents. North America, South America and Australia. He has written a book so this is a plug for his book. On his experiences world wide and aeroplane ferry all around the world. Good reading and easy flowing. not many people have had his experience.
It can be bought on Amazon for $29USD.


My Flying Stories. by Duane Switzer.
https://www.createspace.com/6066427


I enjoyed it which was helped by the fact I get a mention. It is me in the aeroplane that is featured on the front cover.
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Old 06-09-2018, 08:13 PM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burner31 View Post
I would respond to this posting but I have beed advised not to.
Me too !

Too much of a good thing is a bad thing......silence is golden
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Old 06-10-2018, 04:35 AM   #74
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

reply to MIKEINNJ.
yes Mike. I too like the Model A for its simplicity. I've owned my first one for 28 years. I've had a love affair with the ladies since I was a school kid. Other priorities and moving to develop career overrode the purchase of same.
Did you read a previous story I wrote where a farming family owned some 10 of them.
I do like the English Jag and Rover. But just look under the bonnet . It's a nightmare. Simplicity is divine. gary
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Old 06-10-2018, 05:05 PM   #75
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The fencing contractor.




In the early70’s I was mustering cattle in the Northern Territory with a Bell 47. This is a3 seater bubble type helicopter.
The“territory” has many remote and isolated cattle properties. Numerous are 1 mil acres which is the max area available for leasehold. There are 5 properties bigger than 3 mil acres.The quality of this country is variable from poor with only small carrying capacity to very large well grassed plains. Men and women can be characters and some are household names. Bernie Thomlan was one such person. A fencing contractor I met at Willeroo Station which is west of the town of Katherine.


The town ofLarrimah is a little over 100 miles south of Katherine and has a population of 11, yes eleven. A property at Larrimah has an extensive area of Coolabah trees.You know the tree under which the swagman sat after stealing the jumbuck. (waltzing matilda).


Bernie spent3 days there cutting Coolabah posts. Then who should arrive but the station owner and a policeman. Bernie didn’t have permission to gather timber and immediately realised he was stuck. Well the owner said he wasn’t intending to press charges, Bernie departed so did the owner and policeman. But the owner returned next day, along with a truck and helpers. They were now his posts and he was coming to pick them all up. He was pleased with Bernie. Now Bernie the provider.


When he arrived at the site for the posts he found Bernie had returned with his chainsaw and what were posts was now cut in half. Now good only for fire wood.

And no one in the top end of the Territory ever lit a fire except at a stock camp or cattle drive. Aircon was more appropriate.




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Old 06-11-2018, 03:33 AM   #76
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Arrival at Coolangatta.
Late autumn is when the aerial ag industry meets for the AGM. Mostly held on the Gold Coast which is at the southern end of Queensland.
On arrival at the airport, Coolangatta, I was asked to extend my down wind leg. After not getting any further instructions from the tower I called and advised I was now beyond gliding distance from land. I further more had not bought my floaties. Could I have a clearance please to turn to final. Yes, granted. (Floaties may be, I don’tknow, a local term for small plastic blow up floatation devises one puts on the arms of kids and blow up).
After landing and shutting down I called the tower and asked if they would kindly order me a taxi.
Yes give us your name please. Now our family name is unusual and some have difficulty in comprehending. Mexted I say. They asked for “say again” and I gave them same again.
My friend from Stawell in Victoria arrived at the same time. He was standing next to me. His name is Lindsay Seehusen.
Gary, order a cab for me too please. Here’s a mic Lindsay you can make the request. He does so and then of course comes the request for his name.
Smith he says. We have a laugh. The cabs dually arrive. We had a good conference. We have a informative and social time. Many tales are told, some of them quite untrue of course. Comradeship and liquor does expand the imagination of the mind.

I must compare the cropduster pilots convention to the Model A bi annual meeting and conference. That will be tomorrow.
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Old 06-12-2018, 04:50 PM   #77
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Reprimand from military base commander
I was to fly from Jendarata in the north of Malaysia to a plantation airstrip near Ceni in southern Malaysia. When I arrived it was necessary for me to go in person to speak to the base commander of a military helicopter base nearby.
How did you get there the man enquired. I flew outside controlled airspace (OCTA) I responded. He gave me a dressing down for not having lodged a flight plan. Very dangerous pilot I was. Could have had a midair if no one knew I was around. (Malaysian OCTA movements are nil but I didn’t tell him that and he knew anyway.)
It was only a few weeks later there was a midair. Two military helicopters, both on radio and right above the control tower. That is, in controlled airspace and in view of the controller. !!!
For the duration of my flying career all accidents have been CTA or pilots on radio. There is only one exception that I am aware of was in a cotton area in Northern NSW. It was a fatal and very sad especially for those in the ag business.
Whilst the above was serious and sad there was a humorous comment made by the surviving pilot. The engine had gone, the hopper had gone and the most forward part of the aeroplane was the rudder pedals and pilot’s feet. As the aeroplane descended ground wards in a waffling manner the pilot said, ‘shit this will hurt’. It did indeed. He had many months off work.
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Old 06-12-2018, 05:03 PM   #78
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

And a little funny for the day.
Gleaned from a news item many years ago.

Car crashes as Chinese woman gives dog driving lessons

Posted 29 Aug 2006, 12:20amTue 29 Aug 2006, 12:20am

Map: China

Chinese state media says a Chinese woman's attempt to teach her dog how to drive proved a costly error, as her car crashed into an oncoming vehicle.

Xinhua news agency reports no one - including the dog- was injured, but both vehicles were slightly damaged.

Xinhua says the accident happened recently in the city of Hohhot, capital of north China's Inner Mongolia region.

The woman, surnamed Li, had noticed how fond the dog was of crouching on the wheel, and thought it should have a go at steering thecar.

She herself operated the accelerator and the brake.

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Old 06-12-2018, 07:29 PM   #79
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

woofa and all: Love the stories! Keep 'em coming!
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Old 06-13-2018, 02:33 AM   #80
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woofa and all: Love the stories! Keep 'em coming!




yeh, thanks. I'm going to run out of stories sometime. I would be pleased if you and others wrote some too. I have a funny ready for tomorrow and I'll write another story in the morning Australian time.
When I am not working, which is frequent these days I can not break the habit of rising at 4am. So I'm at a loss with nothing to do. So I'll write. It's cold by our standards with temp down to 45 degrees on your Fahrenheit scale. that's cold and it's about to get colder. I'm a sook with cold and with wet weather. I'll write a story about that. soon. gary
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Old 06-13-2018, 09:48 AM   #81
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Back around 1963 or '64 I bought a Model A roadster pickup that had been sitting outside forever. We aired up the tires and they all held air so we hooked it up to my friends 3/4 ton w/a tow bar and were towing it to his place about 25 miles away. About 1/2 way there the left rear wheel of the A decided to go AWOL. After pulling off to the side of the road we followed the track the wheel had made in the grass and retrieved the wheel with the attached hub. We found the axle key back on the road but no nut. Needing a nut I scrounged around and found that the nut holding the spare tire bracket to the frame was just what we needed. "liberated" that nut, put the wheel, axle key and nut back on the axle tightened it up, put a nail in to suffice for a cotter pin and we were back in business.
I figure that back in time, back on the farm, somebody had needed that nut for some other application so had just "borrowed" it.
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Old 06-13-2018, 10:50 AM   #82
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I'm sure many stories could be told about that jack you're using! The brand we had on the farm was "Handyman". It was certainly handy, but dangerous! Notice the small base. If whatever you had jacked up moved a little, over it went. Often, when lowering the jack if your hand slipped off the handle it would start ratcheting down by itself. There was no grabbing the handle to stop it, you just let it go. Ours had a short handle with a slot for a wood extension 2 or 3 feet long. If it got to ratcheting, it would fling that wood handle a good distance. Dad drilled it into me to never get under anything supported only by that jack! Seeing the jack tip over and the self ratcheting thing made that an easy lesson to remember.
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Old 06-13-2018, 05:18 PM   #83
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Originally Posted by katy View Post
Back around 1963 or '64 I bought a Model A roadster pickup that had been sitting outside forever. We aired up the tires and they all held air so we hooked it up to my friends 3/4 ton w/a tow bar and were towing it to his place about 25 miles away. About 1/2 way there the left rear wheel of the A decided to go AWOL. After pulling off to the side of the road we followed the track the wheel had made in the grass and retrieved the wheel with the attached hub. We found the axle key back on the road but no nut. Needing a nut I scrounged around and found that the nut holding the spare tire bracket to the frame was just what we needed. "liberated" that nut, put the wheel, axle key and nut back on the axle tightened it up, put a nail in to suffice for a cotter pin and we were back in business.
I figure that back in time, back on the farm, somebody had needed that nut for some other application so had just "borrowed" it.




hi Katy. It feels good to save something worthwhile from decay or demolition doesn't it. Looking at the photo where it is missing the wheel, it seems like the vehicle was in good condition, that is the restoration wasn't that difficult. I take it the vehicle is not the green closed cab one on your home page.
My wife is older than I and she says I married her because I like old things. eg. Al Jolson is one of my favourite vocalists.
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Old 06-13-2018, 06:39 PM   #84
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today I have a funny and a story will follow. here goes, it is from a newspaper many moons ago and I kept it because I thought it difficult to believe at the time until this very unusual explanation was found by admission.

The cow that fell out of the sky and sunk a Japanese fishingboat.


In 1997, the crew of a Japanese fishing boatwas pulled from the Sea of Japan after clinging to the boat's wreckage for several hours. They were immediately arrested, however, after authorities interrogated them about the boat's fate. To a man, they claimed a cow had fallen from the sky, apparently coming from nowhere, and struck the boat amidships, resulting in a huge hole and its rapid sinking.


The crew remained in prison for several weeks until Japanese authorities were contacted by several highly embarrassed Russianair force officials. It turned out that the crew of a Russian cargo plane had stolen a cow that wandered near their Siberian airfield and forced it onto their plane before they took off for a flight home. Once airborne, the cow apparently panicked and starting rampaging through the cargo hold, causing the crew also to panic because it was affecting the plane's stability. They solved the problem by shoving the cow out of the hold while crossing theSea of Japan at 30,000 feet.


Unfortunately, following Rules 5 (Look-out),and 7 (Risk of collision) won't keep you out of trouble when the danger isairborne!


Source: Australian Financial Review, 16 May2000

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Old 06-13-2018, 07:47 PM   #85
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Reprimand from Malaysian military base commander
I was to fly from Jendarata to a plantation airstrip near Ceni insouthern peninsula Malaysia. When I arrived it was necessary for me to go in person and speak with the commander of a military helicopter base nearby.
How did you get there the man enquired. I flew outside controlled airspace (OCTA) I responded. He gave me a dressing down for not having lodged a flight plan. Very dangerous pilot I was. Could have had a midair if no one knew I was around. (Malaysian OCTA movements are about nil but I didn’t tell him that because he knew anyway.)
It was only a few weeks later there was a midair. Two military helicopters, both on radio and right above the control tower. That is, in controlled airspace and in view of the controller.
For the duration of my flying career all midair collisions have been CTA (controlled airspace) or pilots on radio. There is only one exception that I am aware of and that was in a cotton area in Northern NSW. It was a fatal and very sad especially for those of us in the ag business.
Whilst the above was serious and sad there was a humorous comment made by the surviving pilot. His engine had been taken out and the hopper also The most forward part of the aeroplane was his feet.The windscreen was intact but that only kept the bugs off his face. As the aeroplane descended ground wards in a waffling manner the pilot said to himself,‘shit this is going to hurt’. It did indeed. He had many months off work.
I have avoided several close calls by watching out however that doesn’t seem a fashionable thing to do by many pilots. Many of them believe they have discharged their obligation by making a call to “all traffic”.
Not watching where you are going is a story by it’s self and I think I might write one.
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Old 06-14-2018, 11:04 AM   #86
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While following a friend's '30 sedan one day, it suddenly started spewing a huge cloud of smoke. He pulled off to the side and we found the 1/8" pipe plug had come out of the block, the one by the oil pump, and was dumping oil on the exhaust. I found a zerk fitting on his front axle that had a small check-ball in the center, and screwed it into the block. We added a quart of oil and went on our merry way!
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Old 06-14-2018, 06:01 PM   #87
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Airtractor VH-DDT / DDH.




In 1993 I bought anAirtractor from David Baynes, a cotton sprayer in Wee Waa. It was registeredVH-DDT. David needed the capital to expand thus the sale. But he did want toretain the rego. It was unique. I agreed he could keep it and David changed theAirtractor rego to VH-DDH.





Unfortunately David did notreserve the rego and it was taken by an opportunist. A request was made forthis fellow to relinquish it. That was agreed provided David paid him some$5000. David was pretty sour.





In 1995 I sold my businessto Fieldair. That included VH-DDH.


It had been a favourite withDavid and he requested that he get first offer should Fieldair sell it. Theopportunity came and he went halves with Neville Dunn. Should he have left the originalrego he would have the rego VH-DDT back in his possession.


Unfortunately the plane wascrashed in West Australia. A couple of enterprising engineers then took 2wrecks and rebuilt to one. The rego DDH was dropped when the aeroplane wasrebuilt. Now both VH-DDT and VH-DDH wasrego and now was lost.




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Old 06-14-2018, 06:58 PM   #88
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Airtractor spray aeroplaneVH-DDT.

In 1993 I bought anAirtractor from David Baynes, a cotton sprayer in Wee Waa NSW. It was registered VH-DDT. David needed the capital to expand thus the sale. However he did want to retain the rego. It was unique. I agreed he could and David changed the Airtractor rego to VH-DDH.

Unfortunately David did not reserve the rego and it was taken by an opportunist. A request was made for this fellow to relinquish it. The fellow agreed provided David sent him some $5000. David was pretty sour.

In 1995 I sold my business to Fieldair. That included VH-DDH.
It had been a favourite of David's and he requested that he get first offer should Fieldair sell it. The opportunity arose and he went halves with Neville Dunn. Should the rego remained VH-DDT David would have had it back in his possession.

Unfortunately the plane was crashed in West Australia. A couple of enterprising engineers then took 2wrecks and rebuilt to one. The rego DDH was dropped when the aeroplane was rebuilt. Now both VH-DDT and VH-DDH have gone. That is until David posts 5k AUD to the opportunists.


footnote. I paid David some 330,000 for that aeroplane and the new price was 420,000 if my memory is correct. It came, at the time, without GPS without a heater and without aircon. We were supposed to be tough.
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Old 06-15-2018, 08:32 AM   #89
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Quote:
I'm sure many stories could be told about that jack you're using! The brand we had on the farm was "Handyman".
The brand of jack I saw most often back then was "Jackall", that's one in the picture and I still have and use it occasionally

Quote:
hi Katy. It feels good to save something worthwhile from decay or demolition doesn't it. Looking at the photo where it is missing the wheel, it seems like the vehicle was in good condition, that is the restoration wasn't that difficult. I take it the vehicle is not the green closed cab one on your home page.
Hi Gary, back then I wasn't into Model A's although I had owned and driven a few back in the '50s (daily drivers). I had bought this one on a whim, I paid $15 for it, sold it for $150 and thought I was doing good. The fellow that bought it owned what was called a speed shop, I don't know what he did w/it, I suspect he hot-rodded it. I never saw it again.
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Old 06-15-2018, 07:33 PM   #90
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Working withcloud.
The lowest cloud I ever worked in was south of Jerilderie on the property of Stuart Rochford. Spreading urea. Visibility of one or two miles and very little wind. But the cloud was almost on the deck.
I would turn over trees. Very low. Maybe the lower wing had about a 20 foot margin but part of the top wing was literally in the cloud. The job took a little over one hour. I payed strict attention to every thing. Didn’t blink.
I was pleased when I finished and relaxed enroute home.
Another unusual cloud / work job was at Binjor Plateau near Mundubbera Queensland. Spraying peanuts.The crop was grown to the edge of the plateau and cloud formed at that level because of rising air on the northern side. At the end of the run I had to quickly descend about 100 feet, do a 180 turn then climb and make minor adjustment to my track then continue to spray.
I just loved working at Binjor. A tightly knitted farming community and they were fun and laughter and pranks.
It is worth my saying that I used to fly in very low cloud near ground level. With high tension power wires one could fly under if it was that low. Vis had to be good.
Today my attitude and practice has changed. Mobile phone towers have been erected all around the country and it would be certain death to continue the practise.
I did get one surprise. Destination Bankstown NSW. Tuned nav radio into a radio broadcast station.. I did see it a couple of miles off but the surprise was I hadn’t expected it. It was 1500 feet high.
I’ll tell you about fog in another story.
Bankstown, mentioned above was, in the war renamed Yankstown for obvious reasons. There was local resentment to those Americans. They (Americans) were considerably better paid than the locals and with more cash to splash on the local girls plus nylons.The locals found fault with them. Said they were overpaid, oversexed and over here. Other than Bankstown Americans were well received and popular.
Americans servicemen were also at my local town of Tocumwal. There are some funny stories told by my friend Johnny Haynes who was a kid at the time. Maybe I’ll tell themsome time.
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Old 06-15-2018, 08:10 PM   #91
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I happen to be a computer dinosaur. It would please me if someone was to email me and advise how I can put photos with my writings. thankyou. gary
oldcropduster02@bigpond.com


note signiture
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Old 06-16-2018, 08:31 AM   #92
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Try this: In the lower left of the posting, click on “Post Reply”, then click on the paper clip icon (attachments) that is near the top, a small page comes up “Manage attachments”, click on “choose file”, select the file for the picture you want and then click “open”, the file name will appear next to the “choose file”, then click “upload”.
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Old 06-16-2018, 07:58 PM   #93
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Malaysia was a dry state.

Money changes that. We all know Al Capone make his living by wetting people’s throats? Yes? It happens in every place throughout the world, Malaysia too.
In Malaysia we purchased good beer, San Miguel and poor rum, Tanduay. Both Filipino. It always came in hessian bags and was quite cheap. The sand that came with it was complementary. How come you ask?
Well it was a trade conducted by Filipino pirates. They buried it in the sand and our Filipino loader driver foreman was an intermediary. He formally had been a pirate.
Our supply stopped for a while. The trade had been sprung. It wasn’t too long before the trade began again. It turns out the police had intercepted the liquor and now they became the retailers. The margin increased of course. We were still a profitable and reliable market. They, the police were expected to make up their own wages and they did that with great resource. I’ll tell you more about them in a later story.

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Old 06-17-2018, 05:13 PM   #94
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Aeroplane walks overnight.
In Malaysia we have a few crashes. Not Gary I am keen to add. Well there is many airframe and engine components to salvage. This may take several days to get engineers from Australia to the crash site and several days to strip the plane.
Well the local Malays and /or their guest workers started to do this. Not for us but fortheir own inventory. Not all our components would be retrieved but we know who got some of it.
The aeroplanes were all yellow. Yellow roofs would appear on nearby make shift houses. These were the aluminium skins off the wings and panels off the fuselageof course. Nothing was wasted. Resource fullittle fellows.
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Old 06-17-2018, 06:17 PM   #95
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Circle work at Theodore.
Barry Foster is an ag pilot of comparable vintage to myself. Some years back he was operating out of Theodore in Queensland, spraying cotton. His airstrip was in a bit of scrub near town and that’s the strip where this incident occurred.
About sparrows in the morning Barry goes to work. He arrives at his strip and cranks the aeroplane. It takes time for engine to warm up so Barry climbs out to wait. However climbing out he inadvertently kicks open the throttle and she bursts into what’s nearly full power. Barry is blown over then the left side break lets go. Aeroplane is going around in circles. The kids do this in their motor cars and they call it “circle work”.
Barry has to close the throttle but his endeavours fail. He just can’t get to it. Around and around it goes. Wourh, wourh, wourh wourh she goes, around and around and around and around etc etc etc. The towns folk are awakened. The police arrive. The ambulance arrives. Town folk arrive. Every man and his dog was there. Quite a sensation and spectacle Barry has created.
Eventually Barry got control. It ran out of gas. One hour and twenty minutes after Barry hadcranked it.
Isn't it great there are still some oldies like me otherwise these good tales would be forgotten.
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Old 06-18-2018, 06:34 PM   #96
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Model Atractor.
Did you know there was a model A tractor?
Yes, produced by Harry Ferguson and David Brown. The two are still names of tractors today.
Henry Ford produced the Ferguson TE20 tractor under licence. Infact he made some 441 thousand of them. They are virtually the same as we have here in Australia except the front grill and the throttle.
The Ford -Ferguson agreement was widely known as the handshake agreement. This amicable deal didn’t end the same way. It was acrimony. Ferguson claimed patents had been stolen and sort a settlement of 251mil USD. Settlement was reached following a lengthy and expensive legal battle. 9.25mil USD. The most expensive litigation case in history. Another lawyers field day, they never miss out do they.
And Fergusonwent on to manufacture more than half a million “little grey fergies”. I had one and used it to tow my aeroplanes with. Today my son Dennis has it to tow his aeroplane.
History has it. In 1936 the Ferguson-David Brown tractor, the Model A, was introduced.
“The Little Grey Fergie” was manufactured from 1946 to 1956. Half a million of them. Ferguson went public and later bought out by Textron, who also are manufacturers of Bell Helicopters, Cessna and Beechcraft aeroplanes.
David Brown manufactured the “valueless motor car”. Quite a silly name isn’t it. In 1908, the front resembled a T and the passenger compartments resembled an A. (The Model T was introduced in 1908 also). And for a period 1947 to ’72 the Aston Martin. James Bond drove one. Remember the baddie getting ejected from the passenger seat?
ADCO boughtout David Brown and now it is owned by a German company and I believe still manufactured in Canada under the brand name of Massey Ferguson.
Internetpage to Ferguson-Brown Model A tractor.
http://tractors.wikia.com/wiki/Ferguson-Brown
And to speakof odd names. Alldays and Onions, motor car. Named after the founders of the company that built the car. If you don’t believe me just look it up on the internet.





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Old 06-18-2018, 08:26 PM   #97
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Engine failure at Nagambie.
Years ago I was flying a 400hp Fletcher. This aeroplane was designed by a bloke named Thorpe. It was a upgrade from a military machine. Today the Fletcher is still a manufactured and productive machine in New Zealand. Today a small variant is a home made very light plane for enthusiasts.
One afternoonI felt it surging. Not badly but I knew something in the engine was amiss. I flew it to the maintenance engineer and yes there was failure. Metal segments were upsetting the prop governor and the prop pitch was hunting. I don’t recall what was failing, that was 45 years ago.
About 1984 Itook my Airtractor, powered by a Pratt and Whitney radial, to Melbourne for a rebuilt engine. One could not buy a new one for they had been out of production for about 3 decades. It was still a viable engine then and today it is poweredby a turbine and so is the Fletcher I mentioned above.
I had my buddy Peter Menhennit fly me to Melbourne in my Cessna. About 40 minutes into the return flight I felt surging. Yes, the same problem as I had experience inthe Fletcher.
I had an ideal landing strip, being a track running through a paddock. I closed the throttle and landed. Peter was flying close by and saw this but hadn’t figured what was going on. Because it was getting dark he just kept on flying. I watched my Cessna get smaller and smaller. Then disappear. Here I was, in a paddock and it’s getting dark. I didn’t have a dime on me. (To fly to an airport and pickup a plane didn’t need money or a wallet with ID.)
I got to the road. Women drivers ignored me. I couldn’t go to a pub or motel. With no money or ID I could even be seen as an escapee. Then some kindly bloke did pick me up.
I had a client at home by the name of Sleigh who came from this area and his parents still lived here. (The town was Nagambie Victoria.) I had the driver drop me off there. MrsSleigh answered the door. She opened it only about an inch. However I did establish my credentials and they treated me with great hospitality. But she asked me a question. I will never forget it.
“you went toMelbourne without any money?”. “who do you think you are? Royalty?”
Mrs Sleigh did think I should call the police and tell them what had happened. I pointed out that would start a chain of paper work which I didn’t want. She accepted that. End of story.
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Old 06-18-2018, 08:32 PM   #98
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this is the Fletcher in the earlier story. it is from internet and not the one I was flying. sorry there was supposed to be one photo only. I'm not a computer guru. g
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Old 06-18-2018, 08:35 PM   #99
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Mind if I point out a few things? Henry Ford did NOT "produce the Ferguson TE20 under license". The famous "handshake agreement" resulted in the introduction of the 9N "Ford Tractor Ferguson System" (according to a little badge on the grille) in 1939. This was followed by the nearly identical 2N in 1942. Ferguson held the patents on the hydraulic three point hitch system and Ford built the tractor. Henry Ford Sr. died April 7, 1947 and his grandson dissolved the handshake agreement on June30, 1947. Henry ll took over the company in 1945 or 1946 and the TE20 did not exist until late 1946. The TE20 was the first of "the little gray Fergies". In 1948 Ford Company introduced the 8N, which was an updated 9N.
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Old 06-18-2018, 10:11 PM   #100
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Mind if I point out a few things? Henry Ford did NOT "produce the Ferguson TE20 under license". The famous "handshake agreement" resulted in the introduction of the 9N "Ford Tractor Ferguson System" (according to a little badge on the grille) in 1939. This was followed by the nearly identical 2N in 1942. Ferguson held the patents on the hydraulic three point hitch system and Ford built the tractor. Henry Ford Sr. died April 7, 1947 and his grandson dissolved the handshake agreement on June30, 1947. Henry ll took over the company in 1945 or 1946 and the TE20 did not exist until late 1946. The TE20 was the first of "the little gray Fergies". In 1948 Ford Company introduced the 8N, which was an updated 9N.


Hi Deluxe 40.
No, I don't mind if you point out any error or errors I make. Do however look at my signature at the bottom of my writings. No, I don't know everything.
It's been some time since I saw the Ford tractor in question. At the time the differences I noted was the throttle and the grill. the Au fergie has horizontal fins and the Ford has vertical. There no doubt there are other factors I didn't spot. I looked up on the internet and the 9N is just the same as the TE20 with the exception of a few minor things. yes it was the hydraulic system that was the centre of the litigation. and Perhaps the front axil forks??
you can contradict me, it does not offend me and I can learn from it. cheers, gary
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Old 06-18-2018, 10:43 PM   #101
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Hi Deluxe 40.
No, I don't mind if you point out any error or errors I make. Do however look at my signature at the bottom of my writings. No, I don't know everything.
It's been some time since I saw the Ford tractor in question. At the time the differences I noted was the throttle and the grill. the Au fergie has horizontal fins and the Ford has vertical. There no doubt there are other factors I didn't spot. I looked up on the internet and the 9N is just the same as the TE20 with the exception of a few minor things. yes it was the hydraulic system that was the centre of the litigation. and Perhaps the front axil forks??
you can contradict me, it does not offend me and I can learn from it. cheers, gary
The hydraulic systems were nearly identical, with some parts even being interchangeable, as I remember.
The major obvious difference was the engine. The Fergie was overhead valve while the N series Fords were flathead, being basically half of the 239 V8; pistons, valves, lifters and timing gears being the same. Both the Fergie and Ford grille designs were also used here in the States. When I was a kid on the farm the 9, 2, and 8N fords were everywhere, and TE and TO Fergies were common. Dad bought a 1947 TE20 when I was about 10. Put a lot of hours on the seat of that tractor.
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Old 06-19-2018, 03:38 AM   #102
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Hi there, I enjoyed your story. Iíve always thought that cropdusting would be a real hoot, and Iíve never talked with someone who did it as a profession.

I grew up in Oregon in the Pacific northwestern part of the US. There werenít a lot of people in this state back then and we still arenít densely populated. Lots of open land and more than a few cropdusters.

My model A stories start over 60 years ago when I was 13. My first car was a 1931 coupe that I bought for $25. That car didnít have a dent in it, and really didnít need restoration. I took it apart anyway and learned about every nut and bolt in that car. My love of cars really started with that coupe, and Iíll never forget it. That car taught me how to drive in every condition you can think of, and I owe my love of driving to that first coupe.

I consider myself so fortunate that I grew up in a time when model Aís were a dime a dozen. I miss those times when a simple drive could result in finding a model A hidden in a berry patch or sitting in a barn. All those drives were like treasure hunts for me, and man did I find a lot of treasure. My folks allowed me to have one car at a time. So, when one was up and running, Iíd sell it and get another. That love of those old model Aís kept me out of trouble. I donít even want to imagine the trouble I would have gotten into if it hadnít been for those cars.

Give Woofa a pet for me,

Mike

thank you and I did enjoy reading your repose. I will respond in a couple of days. cheers, gay
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Old 06-19-2018, 04:17 AM   #103
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Hi there, I enjoyed your story. Iíve always thought that cropdusting would be a real hoot, and Iíve never talked with someone who did it as a profession.

I grew up in Oregon in the Pacific northwestern part of the US. There werenít a lot of people in this state back then and we still arenít densely populated. Lots of open land and more than a few cropdusters.

My model A stories start over 60 years ago when I was 13. My first car was a 1931 coupe that I bought for $25. That car didnít have a dent in it, and really didnít need restoration. I took it apart anyway and learned about every nut and bolt in that car. My love of cars really started with that coupe, and Iíll never forget it. That car taught me how to drive in every condition you can think of, and I owe my love of driving to that first coupe.

I consider myself so fortunate that I grew up in a time when model Aís were a dime a dozen. I miss those times when a simple drive could result in finding a model A hidden in a berry patch or sitting in a barn. All those drives were like treasure hunts for me, and man did I find a lot of treasure. My folks allowed me to have one car at a time. So, when one was up and running, Iíd sell it and get another. That love of those old model Aís kept me out of trouble. I donít even want to imagine the trouble I would have gotten into if it hadnít been for those cars.

Give Woofa a pet for me,

Mike


Hi Mike, did you read my story about the farmer and his sons who bought the A's from farmers clearing sales? if you didn't email me and I will forward it to you. thankyou for responding to my story. yes it does please me and thankyou. gary
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Old 06-19-2018, 06:23 PM   #104
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The hydraulic systems were nearly identical, with some parts even being interchangeable, as I remember.
The major obvious difference was the engine. The Fergie was overhead valve while the N series Fords were flathead, being basically half of the 239 V8; pistons, valves, lifters and timing gears being the same. Both the Fergie and Ford grille designs were also used here in the States. When I was a kid on the farm the 9, 2, and 8N fords were everywhere, and TE and TO Fergies were common. Dad bought a 1947 TE20 when I was about 10. Put a lot of hours on the seat of that tractor.



When I was a kid we had Farmall A's and a TD6 and a W4. I have only now realised the correct name was a Farmall Model A. Well I suppose it's been more than 50 years since I drove one infact seen one. I spent my weekends and school holidays driving them. I was so young I didn't know how my dad could drive faster than I. I didn't know there was such a thing as gears. In fact I couldn't depress the clutch fully as I was too young. I used to steer it while dad fed hay to the stock from the trailer I was pulling.
I am having difficulty in attaching picture of Farmall Model A so I will close this before I fluff it and try again on new page.

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Old 06-19-2018, 06:25 PM   #105
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farmall Model A
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Old 06-19-2018, 06:44 PM   #106
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Scaredy Cats.
Yesterday avo I offered a Model A admirer my ute (woofa express) to take for a drive. She declined as she was frightened she may damage it. This is a common response I get when offering the vehicle to people.
I tell them it was a heap of shit when I first acquired it and if it is damaged it is not a big deal to repair it. I tell these scaredy cats the “A” was the first motorcar many had ever driven as their previous transport was a horse. Now they, the horses, never had breaks or comfy seats.
About two years ago I took it to a Ford Fairlane rally. Not to enter it as obviously it was not eligible. I knew some of the public spectators and asked them which Fairlane they liked best. They gave me their preference and followed by saying he maroon ute parked across the road that they liked best. I offered the “A”for them to drive and they too declined. Both were farmers (my favourite people) and were familiar with machinery.
You may notice I call the pickup a utility or ute for short. Australian produced utes differ from the American pickups insofar as the tray side panel is acontinuous panel starting directly behind the door. Some call it a slab side. Whereas the American pickup has astand alone tub. To my knowledge the first Australian pickup was made by Ford about 15 years ago were the ute was first made in the mid 1950’s by GeneralMotors Holden. This matter is both contradictory and controversial. Please note my signature at the bottom of this writing. Many vehicles are delivered as a cab-chassis and one gets the tray made to their own specs. I have a Toyota Landcruiser with a steel tray and a wooden floor. A steel floor lets drums and other slide around too easily and dogs find it too hot to stand on.
As for the comparison of pickup verses ute. I think the stand alone tub, the pickup, is preferable because if the floor gets rusted out or it gets damaged too much it’s easy to replace.
Young folk like utes. It’s a cult following that is strong particularly around farming areas. The“first car” for many farm kids was the old farm ute.
The town of Deniliquin, about 35 miles to the west of me has an annual “ute muster”. It’s now a national event. The record number of utes topped out at more than 8,000 and had 25,000 plus visitors. If there has been rain they make mud. With or without the mud they do “circle work”. They all camp on site many just bringing their swags which is a rolled up bed.Some years back my ute (woofa express) was entered by local farmer, BernardClancy and won the best ute at the muster.



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Old 06-19-2018, 07:00 PM   #107
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sorry people. I somehow managed to have the same item submitted twice and have deleted it. The forum won't allow deletion so I have printed this explanation in lieu of. gary


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Old 06-20-2018, 06:40 PM   #108
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Getting Bogged at Dulacca.
An extensive pocket of fertile black soil in the south east of Queensland is known as the Darling Downs. It starts at the top of the Great Dividing Range in the east and runs west through to the town of Roma in the west.
When blacksoil becomes wet it is like plasticine. One cannot drive on it. Even with grass cover vehicles including aeroplanes sink. After 3 days after rain I was working off the Dulacca town strip on the Darling Downs. Dulacca is a town of about 20 or 25 people.And back soil. The strip was doughy. It had a hump near the west end and that obscures the vision from the loading site.
I did a silly thing. I taxied to the west end to takeoff to the east. I stopped for some reason, the aeroplane sank a little and she just would not move. This could not be seen by Adrian and the farmer, Big Col McLennan and his helper, Jacko who had arrived. I walked back to the loading site to get somehelp. I had them come to the aeroplane and push. Adrian on the left wing, Big Col on the right. I didn’t give Jacko a job because he was pissed. I cranked and applied full power. Adrian and big Col pushing. Now Jacko felt a bit left out so he went and pushed on the tail plane. The plane rolled, I applied back pressure on the pole, accelerated, and became airborne.
When I returned for the next load Adrian was in stiches. For what had happened when I had applied back pressure on the pole Jacko had his forefinger jammed between the elevator and horizontal stabiliser. He ran behind until his legs would carry him no longer. He fell. His fore finger continued for the ride. The story got around. And got bigger and better. Big Col had run after the aeroplane and had Big Col not caught him, Jacko would have gone splat on the ground just like a water melon dropped from a great height.
Now with blood gushing everywhere it was decided to get him to the Miles hospital. To get there they needed to pass the Dulacca pub and since Jacko had lost so much blood they had better replenish his body fluid. The publicans wife took to panic and bandaged and mothered him. I don’t know what happened after that but some weeks later I was in the Queensland pub at Miles. I saw this bloke with his finger right up his nose. It looked disgusting. Then I preconised him as Jacko. Infact he had no finger at all. It was only the stump of his forefinger at the base of his nose. Yeh, he was having a go at me. I laughed, he laughed. We drank some cold beer together.
The story got around the farming community and Jacko became a bit of a legend. I bet even today he just loves to tell the story on how he lost his finger
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Old 06-21-2018, 09:46 PM   #109
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Robo asked for it.
John Robertson is an excavator contractor in the NSW town of Finley. Always full of life and cheek too. Well one day I was spraying a rice crop for Jim Casey. Spraying for grass commonly known as barnyard grass. The herbicide was Ordram. It stinks. After spraying this odour will come from the water for 5 days. Whilst it stinks it is not toxic as such.

Each time I turned the aeroplane to do a return run I’d get the fingers. John made sure I saw him by jumping like a clown. With John was the farmer and his name is Paul Sexton. Sexo may have thought Robo’s behaviour was funny but he Sexo, wasn’t endeavouring to offend me. Well I needed to get even with Robo so when I finished the paddock I left about 5 gallons in the aeroplane hopper and flew at them. Robo then presented the fingers from both hands. He didn’t know what was coming. At about 30 yards I opened the dump lever (ie jettison) and they both wore it. Well they were quite wet and very smelly. Both jumped into the irrigation channel in an endeavour to clean up. Robo went home, washed his clothes 3 times then burned them.

Now Paul had a new ute. The windows were wound down. Ordram entered the cab in the right hand side and what was still airborne came out the left hand side. Sexo washed the cab out with a hose. At the time of writing that was at least 30 years ago.Sexo says he can still smell it on a warm day.
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Old 06-22-2018, 02:38 PM   #110
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Death, No Worries.
It must have been about 1998 I was returning to Australia from East Malaysia. The first sector to Darwin is an 11 hour flight. I depart at first light and that gets me to Darwin in daylight hours. This is important because thunderstorms are still active in the tropics. The wet season has started in the tropical north of Australia where thunderstorms start building in early avo. Avoidance is important at any time but more so now as we are very heavy with full fuel. Full tanks and a hopper load is 900 US gallons. 2.7 tons of fuel. Remember cropsprayers have only 1 engine.
We have no refrigeration at our hotel and so I go to the market for breakfast and food to carry enroute. Only chicken is available. This is what I buy. You can guess the rest of the story but I will continue anyway.
2 hours into the flight Sulawesi comes into view. About the same time my tummy rumbles. It didn’t take alot longer before I was chucking up. Then I had the runs. Had to shit in the plastic breakfast bag. Then chuck up again and shit again and again etc etc. It goes on and on and it was on the nose. This continued for another 6 or 7 hours. I started to improve about East Timor which gave me only another 2 hours to Darwin.
On arrival Darwin the customs man decided to be thorough and found a couple of dozen bottles of Phillipino rum. Tanduay. The engineer had stashed it into the rear fuselage. Don’t know why one would want Tanduay rum in Australia. Maybe novel value. because it's poor quality.
Feeling abit better now I went to a restaurant and ordered a steak meal. When it was laid in front of me I nearly chucked again and rushed out without eating. By 2 in the morning I hadn’t improved so took a taxi to the hospital. The doctor gave me some pills and said those alone would cure my problem. I asked if he should give me some charcoal and he thought that was a good idea. But no it wasn’t. I didn’t shit for the next 8 days and that was as bad as the food poisoning.
I showered late in the morning and departed about midday. It was my intention to fly into the night but approaching end of day I decided to stay at a pub in a small outback community of Birdsville. That is very outback in the Simpson Desert. Again I showered and changed clothes. I ate just a little, my appetite still hadn’t returned. I departed about 1 in the morning.
On arrival at my destination which was Leeton NSW I was told they could smell me at 100yards. The smell hadn’t left me. I was still feeling poorly. I did improve for about 2 days then the result of the charcoal (explained earlier) made me progressively worse.
Future flights I purchased food from the town and had the hotel keep it cool in their kitchen fridge. Whilst I was ill, very ill, I could not fly the aeroplane straight or level. I didn’t really know or care which way to point the nose for Australia and infact I didn’t really care. And I wouldn't have cared if I died. Now that's all ridgie didge.
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Old 06-23-2018, 07:07 PM   #111
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Ben hoodwinks the Sudanese Aviation Authority.
Years ago one was required to do a “type endorsement” on each type of aeroplane one was to fly. It’s an old hang-up we had from the days of adopting British law. It was at the time of this incident law in Sudan too. This is a story from Sudan.
Anyway I was to fly a Thrush. An ag plane powered with a Pratt and Whitney 600hp radial. Aviation law in Australia was rewritten to be simpler in some aspects and type endorsement was abolished. I didn’t have Thrush written as a specific type but because I had
1 Tail wheeland
2 Constant speed propeller
I was covered. But this did not suit the Sudanese so I had to do a type endorsement. In the interim I was granted a dispensation. The exam paper was sent from England and arrived about a month later. I was to be driven to Khartoum to sit the paper. This was a long and frightening road trip. Right of way is given to the vehicle with the loudest horn and the brightest flashing headlights. Drivers spent considerable time tuning horns.
I completed the written exam and returned to the farming area to work, commonly known as the Gazera. I was called back to Khartoum in about a month and told I didn’t pass. The reason, that was stated I must check carburettor heat at 1800 rpm, not 1700 as I had written. Or visa versa I don’t recall. It’s not dissimilar to asking whether you wear your undies inside in or inside out. Just as relevant.

They, the Sudanese aviation authority had been assigned poms to oversee their aviation department and it was a pom who corrected my error. Well did I give him a mouthful. He would not have been accustomed to a reprimand from a colonial. Insubordinate bloody colonial! I was granted a type endorsement about 10 days prior to the end of my contract.

Well the best part of this story is about Ben Buckley. Ben an Australian pilot from the high country in Victoria. He had flown the Fletcher and it was a specific type written on Ben’s licence from earlier days. (I had a story and picture of aFletcher a few days back). Well the Fletcher has a designated type ID as a FU24. When the aviation man pointed out he didn’t have a Thrush endorsement Ben responded by saying, “in Australia we call a Thrush a FU24”. Total bull of course. “Ah, that is good then Mr Buckley”. Ben therefore did not have to suffer the hassle that I did.Smart thinking Ben.
This is the radial thrush Ben convinced the Sudanese Authorities was an FU24
The Thrust picture didn't stick. I have much difficulty in posting photos here.





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Old 06-23-2018, 10:37 PM   #112
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that is my further attempt to load a photograph. I have tried and tried. I hate complexities with anything and especially computers.
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Old 06-23-2018, 11:05 PM   #113
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the Fu24 and radial Thrush. You can see the difference is conciderable
GOT IT GOT IT
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Old 06-24-2018, 01:55 AM   #114
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

I wrote a few days ago about International tractor also making a model A but wasn't competent enough to post a picture. Now posting a picture is a newly found talent so here it is. the International Model A
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Old 06-24-2018, 03:47 PM   #115
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Ford’s Airliner.


Yes Henry made an airliner. Firstly he purchased an aviation manufacturer by the name of Stout in1926 and Mr Stout designed the “Ford Tri Motor”. As the name suggests a 3 engine aeroplane. Ideas were taken (stolen) from the German Junkers which used corrugated skins. The corrugation gave rigidity but was heavier than traditional fabric which is still used today on some new aeroplanes. Then the basic design was taken from the Fokker. I believe this resulted in a law suit. Have I spelt suit correctly?

The aeroplane was produced and sold in 1929 and Ford went on to produce 199 of them. Many of today’s modern airlines commenced with them. It was a military machine to. Now some trivia, KLM was one such airline and KLM stands for Koninklijke Luchtvaart Maatschappij meaning ‘royal airline company. Betcha didn’t know that and I betcha you can’t pronounce the name either.

Today 5 remain and I believe, and stand to be corrected, (see signature at base of this article) the last regular public service they provided was at long island doing a milk run,so to speak. One went to Idaho and was used for crop spraying then went onto forest fire bombing.

Engine power started at 200 hp then 300 and mostly ended with the Pratt and Whitney Radial 985 (cubic inch displacement) which was supercharged and delivered 450 hp. I think that one would find today all remaining aeroplanes were R985’s ( I sat behind these R985’s for years on the Agcat). . A few had the rpm increased to 2700 rpm and delivered 525 hp.

I see on the aviation trading journal “trade a plane” one is offered for 2.85 million.

I reckon many readers will have know the above. Many readers to would know the tune, a once popular duet turned to a hit. Do click onto the link and take a listen even if you know it. It’s great. Ada Jones and Billy Murray

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eFZDB6DqAnA

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Old 06-24-2018, 04:04 PM   #116
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

you may perhaps find some of my words run together. sorry.

What happens is I pen the story using the programme "word" then cut and paste. This is where the error occurs. I do edit it however I do miss some too. gary.
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Old 06-25-2018, 06:45 PM   #117
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The Missing Link.
It was said by teachers I would never become a pilot. I was not bright. Well if I can say so I became a leader in aerial agricultural standards. Insurance carriers talk of me in never having a claim outside a total engine failure. Retiring shortly with 30k hours.
Another agpilot by the name of Chris Holden was told the same. He is a successful pilot in NSW with years of good safe experience.
David Link was a farm boy in the agricultural area I serviced. Ridiculed at school and named “the missing link”. When I bought a new (to me) aeroplane David would appear to check it out. He would appear again, shortly after with all the specs of the aeroplane and power plant. He always was interested in aeroplanes.
My son Dennis was in the same school year as David. When school finished and kids are seeking employment 15 of them, Dennis said, had applied to the airforce for a job. I asked who they were. I had not seen a single one on of them on the airfield and not one was accepted to my knowledge.
David goes and gets a job as drilling assistant, a no future job. He saves his money and takes lessons flying helicopters. His successful career takes him to theNorthern Territory mustering cattle. Then various jobs including in Canada. He returns to Australia and takes up an appointment with National Parks. Everything is going well.
The police aviation wing wanted one extra helicopter pilot and had 74 applicants. David got that one job. Today he flys the most interesting jobs in outback and city. Flies around the big buildings at night with night flying goggles. Still a pilot and did not need tobecome a policeman.
I admire David, the farm kid who was ridiculed at school. Like Chris Holden and myself those lampooned can reach high standards and command top jobs. Hats off to you farm boy.

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Old 06-26-2018, 12:08 PM   #118
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The Staff Car.
After making the purchase of my first A I drove it home. It was running very poorly, difficult to drive with front wheel slop. I had paid $2k for this and the farmer who sold it to me thought I was just nuts. He was correct .
When I reached our small town of 2000 I followed a ute (pickup) that had a load of school kids on the tray, all in cricket whites, armed with shin pads and bats and stumps. Everything one uses to play cricket. They were being driven to the sports ground.
Well when they saw me in that car, Jed Clampett’s car couldn’t hold a candle to it, they with outstretched arms gave me the thumbs up. At that very instant, as if it was their signal of command, the car got wheel shimmy. Their outstretched arms and their thumbs up immediately turned to outstretched arms and fore fingers pointing at me, heads held right back and they were roaring with laughter. I think I still had their approval.
Then into our back yard. Didn’t get wife’s approval. Instead got her abuse. What? What will you do with that? We don’t have much money and you’ve just blown a heap ona pile of rusty tin!
Well things remained at a stalemate for quite a while. As I said we had no money. Eventually it was rebuilt and now runs well is nicely painted and named "the staff car". Wife has softened and now enjoys "the staff car".
It was used in my business. For a 3 month period we hire and accommodated an additional 2 pilots for the duration of the rice sowing and spraying season. The first two out in the morning each took a vehicle with a closed cabin and last to leave got the A. because it was cool. However the first to return home in the afternoon or evening took the A because it was warm.

A traditionat the start of every season was to buy new and ridiculous hats. One year Mexican. One particular afternoon we donned these hats and drove 10 miles south to Tocumwal. I well remember, infact would never forget, being overtaken by an expensive Landrover with 3 mature and well dressed ‘Ladies’ on board. As they drew abeam us they all turned and looked left (we drive on the left in Au). At that very instant they broke down with laughter. Difficult to describe the instantaneous and intensity of that very moment but the 3 of us still mention it from time to time. Yes the hats did attract attention. Mainly they were purchased as a new season ritual and perhaps a form of kinship of 3 experienced crop spay pilots.
The three ofus will never forget that very funny incident. I don’t believe the 3 ladies in the Landrover will either.
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Old 06-26-2018, 12:20 PM   #119
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the "staff car" on first arrival at my home in Finley NSW.
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Old 06-26-2018, 10:40 PM   #120
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Originally Posted by woofa.express View Post
The Missing Link.
It was said by teachers I would never become a pilot. I was not bright. Well if I can say so I became a leader in aerial agricultural standards. Insurance carriers talk of me in never having a claim outside a total engine failure. Retiring shortly with 30k hours.
Another agpilot by the name of Chris Holden was told the same. He is a successful pilot in NSW with years of good safe experience.
David Link was a farm boy in the agricultural area I serviced. Ridiculed at school and named ďthe missing linkĒ. When I bought a new (to me) aeroplane David would appear to check it out. He would appear again, shortly after with all the specs of the aeroplane and power plant. He always was interested in aeroplanes.
My son Dennis was in the same school year as David. When school finished and kids are seeking employment 15 of them, Dennis said, had applied to the airforce for a job. I asked who they were. I had not seen a single one on of them on the airfield and not one was accepted to my knowledge.
David goes and gets a job as drilling assistant, a no future job. He saves his money and takes lessons flying helicopters. His successful career takes him to theNorthern Territory mustering cattle. Then various jobs including in Canada. He returns to Australia and takes up an appointment with National Parks. Everything is going well.
The police aviation wing wanted one extra helicopter pilot and had 74 applicants. David got that one job. Today he flys the most interesting jobs in outback and city. Flies around the big buildings at night with night flying goggles. Still a pilot and did not need tobecome a policeman.
I admire David, the farm kid who was ridiculed at school. Like Chris Holden and myself those lampooned can reach high standards and command top jobs. Hats off to you farm boy.

Must be something about pilots, I was told by the school councillor to take auto-motives in high school so when I got kicked out, I could get a job changing oil. Instead headed to the local airport, got a job after school pulling airplanes in and out of the hangar. When not tugging aircraft around was washing, polishing and vacuuming them. By the time I finished high school had my commercial pilots license, never looked back. Heard later the councilor was speechless and most of the teachers were cheering me on.
When my aviation career ended I retired with 22,380 hours, flew the older Boeings including B747s and traveled all around the world. Must be something said for being slow and focused he he he.
I could tell stories about what some real sharp class mates ended up doing, suffice to say I am quite happy with my career choice. God Bless you all.
Gerry Allen, Birch Bay Wa
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Old 06-27-2018, 02:42 AM   #121
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Must be something about pilots, I was told by the school councillor to take auto-motives in high school so when I got kicked out, I could get a job changing oil. Instead headed to the local airport, got a job after school pulling airplanes in and out of the hangar. When not tugging aircraft around was washing, polishing and vacuuming them. By the time I finished high school had my commercial pilots license, never looked back. Heard later the councilor was speechless and most of the teachers were cheering me on.
When my aviation career ended I retired with 22,380 hours, flew the older Boeings including B747s and traveled all around the world. Must be something said for being slow and focused he he he.
I could tell stories about what some real sharp class mates ended up doing, suffice to say I am quite happy with my career choice. God Bless you all.
Gerry Allen, Birch Bay Wa


that was a most pleasing post Allan. I had tomorrows story planned however I will change it to a story of my children. you should relate to it. Do send me your email address and I'll muster up some photogaphs and post in return.
each year I host a morning tea and luncheon for old cropdusters. those of us who sprayed DDT. That was abolished about 81. There was no mark up in this insecticide and manufacturers didn't defend it as they wanted to move new products they had patents on. Bigger markup.
The direction aviation is taking is of concern. More computer controlled aspects to cover unskilled pilots. That's airlines not ag. My kids keep me informed and I see this in accident reports. Ag is becoming more computer , not control but monitoring. ag to me is like riding a bike. I have had 50 years of it this July. but I mess up the computers used for tracking and monitoring. The, look I'll continue in an email, cheers, gary
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Old 06-27-2018, 07:26 PM   #122
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Response to Gerry Allen’s reply to my story of David Link.
I had today’s short story planned but in view of a reply from Gerry Allen I have written a new story. Gerry’s story moved me and his story is similar to mine and many other pilots I know and mix with. The biggest requirements one needs to achieve in aviation is to crawl over 3 miles of broken glass to get there.Nothing else is important. Formal qualifications only massage the ego of the holder and detract future employers attention to applicants knowledge, ability, initiative and work ethic.
This story is about my 2 sons. Whilst I am both pleased and proud of them, their work and determination to achieve, is the point of this story. This is similar to David Link in yesterdays story and to Gerry Allen (fromBirch Bay, Washington state) who is a high time airline pilot and responded to the David Link story yesterday.
My sons are Dennis (Mushy) and Michael (Moo). When they were kids I never asked them to work. I just told them they had to. No misunderstandings there. Part of that work was aeroplane related, washing and loading chemicals, fertilizer or seed.
In their school holidays they worked at a local gliding school (you might call gliders sailplanes). Sweeping, mowing, cleaning and other shitty work. The boss wanted his pound of flesh and that pleased me.
When they finished school they worked for me. No privileges. Drove heavy loading trucks. Big hours, same wages as other employees. They saved sufficient money to pay for their flying licences.
There is a two year age difference. They both towed gliders, same school as mentioned above. Mushy finished with about 700 hours total time and Moo 900. Good experience and good leadership by employer and staff. $60 per week for about 80 hours work. Acceptable by dad.
Mushy found a job in an aeroplane paint shop. Dirty and smelly. Did a short term working for a third level airline then made it to a well known airline.
Moo worked in a furniture manufacturing factory then a third level airline. A well known airline took him too. Today they both are international pilots and have commands on heavy jet airliners.
Why have Itold you this? Not to brag but to demonstrate how determination overcomes the bullshit of ticking boxes and qualifications. Uni graduates in aviation theory and licence issue where it was all provided didn’t do so well. One such kid is the son of a late personal friend. He did however make it to airlines. Today he is a baggage handler.
Today much has changed but there is something that hasn't. Work and determination to succeed is rewarded. Not only in flying but other jobs and professions as well.
There is another subject that is close to my heart. The treatment of farmers by government, media and public. These are the people that toil hard, frequently losing money, even going bankrupt with drought or floods.They grow the food that is placed on our dining table. We all should be gratefulto those people on the land. That story is for another day.
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Old 06-28-2018, 02:00 AM   #123
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Tocumwal hosts Fairlane Meeting.
Tocumwal Ford Fairlane meet. Two people I asked which car they liked the most. The answer was quite predictable. The same vehicle. Both were quick to add their favourite was the maroon ute parked over the road. Utes are a popular cult vehicle especially in farming areas where farm boys inherit their dad's old ute. It's sort of a sports vehicle. One can put the dog and swags on the tray and that seems to hold a lot of status. Two dogs on the back is even more status. these are working dogs not lap creatures.
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Old 06-28-2018, 02:23 AM   #124
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I have 3 Model A's and a G.M. Holden. One each for my 4 kids. Too many for me to look after so my son Dennis gave his to his friend to use. It is better to have them used than sit idle. It lives at Goulburn NSW and the user is an aeroplane engineer. I think Dennis gets a bit of aeroplane servicing done there. All vehicles have names. this is "old chocolate" .
You, reader, will notice I've posted 3 today. Too cold to venture too long outdoors.
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Old 06-28-2018, 02:58 PM   #125
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Mohammad turns green.
I arrived at Sahabit number 9 airstrip, as arranged to find my loader driver waiting but no fertilizer to spread. It wasn’t too much longer before the fertilizer arrives, in 1 ton bags. Well there were no slaves to decant these bags.
Having Mohammad translate I say to the drivers, 3 in all that if I, Mr Gary decants would they help. In one noun, said with explicit clarity the answer was negative. I ask again with emphasis on Mr Gary also decanting. Again an unambiguous response.
“Mohammad tell these drivers they have tiny little balls”. Mohammad’s brown skin changes colour. “Mohammad tell them” and again “Mohammad tell them”. Mohammad is now green and the words come from his mouth slowly and constrained. I spread my thumb and forefinger to about half an inch to illustrate the size I had in mind.
Needless tosay I had extremely offended them. Well that was my intention. They were dark on me.
They made several trips during the day and they lightened up. On their last trip I got a wave and a small smile.
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Old 06-29-2018, 02:31 PM   #126
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The Anyway Brothers.
I was spraying cotton at Wee Waa in central NSW. The aeroplane developed an oil leak from flange where the propeller is bolted to the engine drive shaft. Oil on windscreen obscures vision. An O ring needed replacing. I flew to Moree to the workshop. I had not met the owner / chief engineer. He walked up to the plane and offered his hand. “I’m Campbell anyway”. I took his hand and gave my name. Campbell gave a good firm handshake. I like that.
Another bloke appeared and with a handshake he introduced himself . “I’m Phillip anyway”. Must be Campbell’s brother I figured. Then a third bloke appeared and like the previous two introduced himself “I’m Peter anyway”.
Well Ithought it was great. Three brothers working together in a business. The Anyway brothers.
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Old 07-01-2018, 04:38 PM   #127
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Red Tide.

No, nothing to do with Russian submarines.
I was working in the Malaysian state of Sabah which is located in the north east of Borneo. I had 2 drivers. One Amat and the other Ali. We mostly took 2 when we were working away from our usual base. Company was important to them.
One day Ali was to work but he came to me “Ali very ill today Mr Gary, cannot work”. That’s okay Ali, Amat can work in your place.
Next day Ali came to work again because it was Amat was very ill. Strange. Next day Mr Gary very ill. I flewback to base and saw a Filipino doctor by the name of Dr. Pete. He wanted to send me to hospital in an ambulance. I had never seen an ambulance at our base town and the ambulance probably meant a taxi with the fastest driver. Just didn’t appeal. So I flew to town, Lahad Datu, about a 30 minute flight. You will find it on Google Maps.
A local doctor received me. I asked his name and he said it was so long I’d need to stop for a drink of water before I finished saying it, but the abridged version was Anan.
I had the shits. Badly. After 3 days the doctor was keen to send me to Tawau where they could operate on me. That didn’t appeal greatly either. Then they changed their mind. They intended to discharge me. Probably couldn’t afford an orang putti (White man) death on their hands. About the same time Dr Pete’s wife arrived with several bunches of grapes and a bottle of prune juice. This I consumed then I was discharged.

I called a taxi to take me to the airport where my plane was but on the way I needed a toilet stop badly and had him divert to the Exectitive hotel. The grapes and prune juice had run straight through me. I shit. Large quantity, rapid and runny. Instantly, yes instantly I felt better. The Dr. Pete’s food stuffs had cleaned me out.
Some weekslater the company principle was up from South Australia and we were having dinner at a grubby little cafe about 10 miles out of town. A doctor was there,a mate of Dr Pete’s. He knew about the incident and said I shouldn’t have flown as my blood pressure was down to 70. Then the boss man said “forgot to tell youGary, 7 died at that time”. The poisoning was from “red tide”. That is an algae, pale red in colour. It had grown in the sea out from Tawau. The 3 of us had being poisoned from eating fish. Red tide is not an uncommon occurrence in many parts of the world. They, Ali and Amat were tougher than I and recovered in a day.
I have just looked up Red Tide on the internet and treatment is contradictory. 1. Pumpstomach out and that’s what the grapes and prune juice did. And 2. Give charcoal and that stops diarrhoea.
Did you readabout my charcoal incident in a previous story?
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Old 07-02-2018, 03:25 PM   #128
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Nick Names.

Our kids all have nick names. Many people have nick names. Derived mainly through their personality or habits or habitat or something associated to them. Of course.
I know acontractor who doesn’t really have an ego but got this name, I think, because he has been successful and competing contractors are just a little jealous and resentful.
Have you heard this before. FIGJAM. Well you can guess what the first letter stands for.
F*** I’m Good, Just Ask Me.
Maybe thatname is not uncommon but it always amuses me.
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Old 07-02-2018, 03:31 PM   #129
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OFF LIKE A SHOT OUT OF A CANNON

When I was a young bloke I took a job mustering cattle in the outback Kimberly Range at a station by the name of Dunham River.
Outback stations have some characters and some with an AKA names. Many escaping alimony and some the law. They can be unique people with strong personalities and character.
Dunham River station was purchased by a Texican by the name of Goddard. He purchased a Piper Cub and I flew it and mustered wild cattle in conjunction with a stock camp. The stockmen in outback are known as ringers. I guess this name was because wild cattle would break from a mob and the stockmen would head them back into the mob which would move in a circular motion. Bulls that just could not be mustered were caught individually by Ďbull catchersí. The ground surface would need to be smooth enough to run a vehicle that had built onto the front a Ďbull baríand had steel wrapped around the cab and had the roof and windows removed. Justlike the movie ĎHatarií.
Well one well known bull catcher was TC, short for the cannon. A tough bloke with a soft heart.TC and family lived in a caravan park in the nearby town of Kununurra. Well TC had never submitted a tax return in his life. One day two tax inspectors arrived at TC's campsite and advised that their call was a courtesy call and they would be back in the morning to review TC's books. Well TC had no books. He also had a dislike and perhaps a fear of government. Yes they would return in the morning.
When they returned in the morning TC was gone. He had returned to Dunham River,collected his semi trailer and stock crate plus his Toyota bull catching vehicle. He had passed through Camooweal in Western Queensland some 963 miles east. Canon my name and cannon by function.
Would you believe no matter how intensive the tax men inquired and delved they couldnít find anyone who knew where TC had gone.
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Old 07-02-2018, 03:47 PM   #130
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Record employment in Aerial Ag Industry.
Dalby is a town of 13,000 people on the Darling Downs and is located 130 miles north west of the state capital of Brisbane, Queensland. It’s industries are predominantly agricultural mostly grain and cotton with supporting industries. One of these industries is agricultural spraying services of which there are three. The oldest was formally Les Keys Aviation and sadly Les was killed in a power wire strike in1973. The company remained in the family and rebadged itself as Keyland Aviation. I flew for Keyland from 75 to 79. A good company to work for. I departed to prepare for an airline job but never made it. I was offered an ag aviation business in the Riverina and took that. I was always a little disappointed I never got to fly those big powerful aeroplanes but I did make the best choice. But I am getting away from the point of this story.
Recently retired secretary to Keyland is Sharon Bridle. 52 years in one job. What Sharon didn’t know wouldn’t be worth knowing. She started when she was 22, so you can figure out her age.
She was a good looking chick when she started and only one thing has changed. She is now a good looking middle aged woman.
She will spend quite a bit of her time nursing husband Bob who suffers from spinal arthritis. Despite his handicap, which is severe, he is always smiling and jovial. Don’t think I would be.
Enjoy yourretirement Sharon and I know you enjoy your grandkids. You are fortunate to have a happy bloke to live with.
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Old 07-02-2018, 06:58 PM   #131
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

I don't even know where to begin when it comes to my love affair with the model A. I grew up in Northern Massachusetts, and my parents had a barn full of antique cars. We had forties flatheads, Packard's, a 53 Dodge, and two Model A's. One was an old doodlebug cut down in WWII to be a tractor, dozer, and snow plow. My father had been plowing our driveway with it since the blizzard of 78. The other was a 31 Woody, and she was all original.

When I hit the age of twelve, most of the cars were gone; the woody to boot. But the doodlebug stayed. That was my first restoration. I started it with my father when I was twelve, and finished when I was 16. We rebuilt the engine, pulled what was left of the body off and did all that work as well as the chassis. I loved coming home from school and working on that old truck. she still plows the driveway today, and is my avatar.

Fast forward to me at 24. I graduated from Massachusetts Maritime Academy with a 4.2. my folks were thrilled! my graduation present? a Model A I could drive. I found a barn fresh 30 Tudor that hadn't been started in 60 years. I went and looked at it, bought it, and drove it up on the trailer myself to bring it home. I partially rebuilt the engine, and have kept the car in its original survivor state. Shes not the prettiest thing to look at, but it's my first real A. I have put close to 7500 miles on the car, and met many people in the region who are connected with the car and know it well. In fact, I was at a car show, and the original owners son saw the car and left me a note on the windshield. Come to find out, the first owner of the car was my great uncle.

A's have a funny way of taking hold of people. Im newly thirty, and am getting married next October. My fiance loves the Model A, and beams every time she gets a ride in it. I have nine Fords in my quiver now, all antiques, and she still loves the Tudor the best. So instead of leaving the altar in a fully restored stock 50 shoebox woody, she wants to leave in the A. I couldn't have picked a better car to do it in.
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Old 07-03-2018, 03:46 PM   #132
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

A Remote chance of Good Luck

When I was in business I appointed 2 agents, both farmers in their respective areas. For the Oaklands area it was Peter Kerr who thoroughly enjoyed the job. Organising other farmers and being general assistant to us. He was great to work with.
About midday Peter arrives at the airstrip which was really a paddock of last years stubble just as I was touching down. I pulled up at the loader for the next load and Peter tells me to shut down. I was losing oil.
Now skip back to the previous night. We had changed the oil and the bottom collector tank plug was not tightened. I will explain how the lubrication system works, basically anyway. The engine is a single row 9 cylinders. Always an odd numberfor each row. Thus a 2 row may well be 18 cylinders but each row remains an odd number. Number 1 cylinder is at 12 o’clock and they are numbered in an anti clockwise direction looking from the front. You will notice a small collector tank between numbers 5 and 6. This collects oil from the top of the cylinders which lubricates the valve rockers and valve guides. From this collector tank oil is pumped back to the reservoir which is an airframe component and holds 9 or 10 gallons. To drain the oil one drains the reservoir and this collector tank. The bottom of the collector tank has either a quick release valve or a brass screw. Mine was this brass screw that was not tightened.

Now back to Peter. He had seen the plug fall out on touch down and oil spilling from the collector tank. He also knew where to find the plug which wasn’t difficult anyway. Just follow the oil slick just like Hansel and Gretel followed the rose petals.
We screwed the plug back and checked the oil quantity. Lost very little.
Now what a great coincidence. Plug lost and observed. Lost on landing and not in flight. Saved an expensive engine and potentially the airframe.
I had a R1340 engine pump the entire oil overboard some years previously. That’s another story. The oil loss came to my attention by the odour of heat and I made a landing, did destroy the engine though.
Every farmer asked me how the crank worked. Simple. Maybe I’ll do a story about it. Anotherday. Perhaps tomorrow.
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Old 07-04-2018, 03:44 PM   #133
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Exhilarating and Embarrassing.

You know what teenage kids are like, especially girls. Always embarrassed about their parents. Yes?
We have a daughter named Sarah. But when she was born my wife Patsy and I couldn’t agree on a name. Her birthday was July 14th 1974. Now that just happened Bastille day( 185 years before). The French equivalent to the American 4th July. So being Bastille day she was, in the interim, nick named Fifi. The name never wore off.
Fifi always had plenty of friends visit and the first question they always asked was “Mr M, would you please take us for a ride in your old car”?
Yes, of course I would. They’d all pile in. Up the road we’d go honking and waving at oncoming cars pretending we knew them. One could plainly see the confusion on their faces. The visiting girls getting right in the spirit. Fifi sliding below window level with embarrassment. Then up town. Honking at any boys on the footpath. And waving to of course. Under the seat Fifi would slide.
God, you can be an embarrassment dad.!
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Old 07-05-2018, 05:42 PM   #134
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

The Staff Car.
After making the purchase of my first A I drove it home. It was running very poorly, difficult to drive with front wheel slop. I had paid $2k for this and the farmer who sold it to me thought I was just nuts. He was correct .
When I reached our small town of 2000 I followed a ute (pickup) that had a load of school kids on the tray, all in cricket whites, armed with shin pads and bats and stumps. Everything one uses to play cricket. They were being driven to the sports ground.
Well when they saw me in that car, Jed Clampett’s car couldn’t hold a candle to it, they with outstretched arms gave me the thumbs up. At that very instant, as if it was their signal of command, the car got wheel shimmy. Their outstretched arms and their thumbs up immediately became an outstretched fore finger pointing at me, heads held right back and they were roaring with laughter. I think I still had their approval.
Then into our back yard. Didn’t get wife’s approval. Instead got her abuse. What? What will you do with that? We don’t have much money and you’ve just blown a heap ona pile of rusty tin!
Well marriage remained a bit distant for a while. As I said we had no money.Eventually it was rebuilt and runs well. It is painted desert sand (light) and the marriage improved.
It was used in my business. For a 3 month period we hire and accommodated an additional 2 pilots for the duration of the rice sowing and spraying season. The first two out in the morning each took a vehicle with a closed cabin and last to leave got the A. because it was cool. However the first to return home in the afternoon or evening took the A when it was warm. I call it the “staff car”.
A traditionat the start of every season was to buy new and ridiculous hats. One year Mexican. One particular afternoon we donned these hats and drove 10 miles south to Tocumwal. I well remember, infact would never forget, being overtaken by an expensive Landrover with 3 mature and well dressed ‘Ladies’ on board. As they drew abeam us they all turned and looked left (we drive on the left in Au). At that very instant they broke down with laughter. Difficult to describe the instantaneous and intensity of that very moment but the 3 of us still mention it from time to time. Yes the hats did attract attention. Mainly they were purchased as a new season ritual and perhaps a form of kinship of 3 experienced crop spay pilots.
The three of us will never forget that very short and very funny incident. I don’t believe the 3 ladies in the Landrover will either.
below is a photograph of the Tourer behind the ute and to the right is the "staff car" when I first got it home.
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File Type: jpg staff car first purchased.jpg (20.1 KB, 7 views)
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Old 07-05-2018, 05:55 PM   #135
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Tomorrow I shall have an explanation of how a radial engine works. It is a question many people ask me. Many of you will know but there will be some who don't and are curious.
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File Type: jpg cat2.jpg (28.0 KB, 6 views)
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Old 07-06-2018, 09:26 AM   #136
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Radial engines. How do they work?


My apologies to you. The illustrations were supposed to be with the pertinent explanation but because I am an old fossil or computer dinosaur they ended up down the bottom. I'm sure you will figure it all out. g

To answer the question. How do they work. The question every farmer asked me.
Here is the crank and the conrod conection plus cam.The master rod is number 5 cylinder. If that fails the engine trashes itself. I have had that experience.
The cam is a ring of about 12 inches in diameter. The R985 has gear teeth on the inside of the ring and of course the lobs on the outer.

There is only one crank journal.

This is a supercharger. Piston engines have a centrifugal blower and jets have axial compressors. The PT6 have both.

Note the collector oil sump between numbers 5 and 6. This oil is pumped to the reservoir which is an airframe component. Notice the Pratt and Whitney badge on the sump.Engineers steal that on engine removal when it goes for overhaul. The push rod covers in the engine illustrated above are chromed. This massages the owners ego.
For those inquisitive people you may well find working models on youtube.
Hope you enjoyed reading that.
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File Type: jpg radial crank 1.jpg (13.4 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg Radial crankshaft.jpg (12.4 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg radial conrod system.jpg (6.2 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg crank conrod system R985.jpg (11.6 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg centrifical blower.jpg (4.5 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg cam ring.jpg (10.6 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg r985.jpg (18.5 KB, 2 views)
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Old 07-07-2018, 02:39 AM   #137
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

you have today's story early.

DIFFICULT HARRY.

I was enroute to Darwin and then onwards to Malaysia. The first sector is 11 hours and I decided to stop at Alice Springs and have a lunch break at the airport terminal. I spoke to Darwin tower out of courtesy because I didn’t have a transponder. I got some bloke by the name of Harry. He was most difficult. I may get to Darwin and declined entry he said. I didn’t think that would happen so after lunch I spooled up for Darwin and took off. I didn’t have alot of power.Something was wrong. The engine has just had a hot section inspection. Why would something be wrong unless it was assembled incorrectly. I turned around and returned to Adelaide. Yes a seal had been crushed in reassembly.

I departed 4 days later, again had lunch at Alice then called Darwin tower. What a change. Bloke most helpful and even apologetic about the attitude of Harry. The flight through Darwin and onwards was just how I like it. Uneventful.

To proceed with this story I must explain a service provided by Air Traffic Control (ATC). Weather conditions are recorded and transmitted continuously to all inbound aeroplanes. This is called ATIS meaning "automatic terminal information service."

When I returned home about 2 months later I wrote to the Officer in Charge of the Darwin base.
I suggested to him he promote Harry to PAR. Now that means, in my mind anyway, permanent ATIS reader. Never did get a reply to my letter.

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Old 07-07-2018, 11:39 AM   #138
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Woofa, you forgot to tell us that a radial engine of 9 cylinders has 8 cam lobes, a 7 cylinder 6 lobes, etc. Now, let them figure that out!
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Old 07-07-2018, 03:04 PM   #139
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

I had never counted them but yeh that would be correct. A four stroke engine that requires two revolutions to have each one fire. And they fire alternately and induct alternately.
My name. Woofa is my dog pictured in my logo and Woofa express is his vehicle, so he thinks. My name is gary and I frequently use "oldcropduster". Old? yes this months makes 50 years of it. I want to retire but my boss asks just one more year.
But I don't take offence. cheers, gary
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Old 07-08-2018, 02:41 PM   #140
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

James McGee. #1

I drove from Finley to Wee Waa one day in 1995. It was late morning and I was between the towns of Coonabarabran and Narrabri, a timbered area known as the Pilliga. The country was undulating and there were some steep climbs.
I came across an elderly gentleman pushing his bicycle up the hill and I stopped and invited him to put his cycle on the back of my ute and I would take him the next 70 miles.
In a Texican speech drawl he told me it was his ambition to ride the whole way from Melbourne to Cairns. He was passed 70 yo. He went on to tell me he was adiabetic and did some long rides including Mexico to Canada.
Where do you sleep I asked. Just on the road side he replied. I am tired and have no difficulty.
Is there anything you want I asked? Yes, water please.
What? Didn’t you bring water?
Yes, I did,but I didn’t know it was so far between locations to replenish.
I will be back this evening. Is there anything I can bring you? Yes, more water please.
It will be about dusk. If you are pulled over leave your high vis saddle bag on a guide post for me.
That evening I find the saddle bag, and refilled his water bottles and gave him some nice sandwiches I bought in Narrabri. We conversed some more and I left him on his stony uncomfortable bed.
He called me on the phone from Cairns. He had made it.
We had an interesting conversation back in the Pilliga. One that made me feel ashamed. Het old me he had only 3 months visa in Australia and had to keep moving. Just ask for an extension I suggested. No, he could not. Before this current visa was issued he was required to sign a document to state he would not apply for an extension.
This bloke had fort in the Coral Sea to stop the Japanese fleet from invading Australia and we treated him like that. Do you think it was shameful? If those public servants had a brain they would be lonely. Of course they would blame the government.
We corresponded by mail. He had many tales and he was hospitable. He would drive his campervan to the Oshkosh air show to give he and I accommodation for that big renowned air show. I never did go.

He tells an interesting story and this is revealed in “James Mcgee #2 tomorrow.


Recently I read an account of an elderly American being reprimanded by a French immigration official for not having a visa to enter France. The elderly gentleman retorted by saying the last time he came a visa was not required. The official asked "when was that?".
In 1944 the elderly gentleman said.

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Old 07-09-2018, 06:08 AM   #141
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Wednesday onwards I will show you painted grain silos. I need to know how to blow them up rather than paste tiny ones like you see below. Maybe one of you could contact me and tell me how. g
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Old 07-09-2018, 07:14 PM   #142
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James McGee #2.
James wrote and asked me if I had seen his little town of Vidor on the news. No I hadn’t.
Well James tells me the Feds built some houses in Vidor to provide for the unemployed. Well, those getting out of jail would be unemployed. And many of those getting out of jail were black.
Well Vidor, James goes on to say, is a white town and the bill boards on the entrances to town tell arriving travellers just that.
Well some blacks arrived quickly followed by the KKK. Now that is what James was speaking about. It was a world news item.
The blacks quickly departed Vidor for the adjacent town of Beaufort. One of them sadly was randomly shot in a drive by shooting.
Many of my Australian friends were a little shocked by the notice board as such a public statement in Australia would end the writer in court. Public sentiment and law is against speech that may be offensive. I do feel myself that notice board was distasteful but it is not my intention to tell Americans how they should conduct themselves.
I enjoyedcommunicating with James McGee.

Painted silos tomorrow
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Old 07-10-2018, 01:30 PM   #143
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Yarriambiack Shire.
Most of these silos are in the Yarriambiack Shire which is in the west of the state of Victoria.
Population 6,600 and has a land area of 740,000.sq.km. An agricultural area which is mainly grain growing and thus the silos. Like other places in Australia and indeed around the world, being remote and agricultural means the community is conservative, supportive, loyal to each other and accustomed to drought and other hardships.
The paintings demonstrates the difference in uniforms in war time of today compared to yesteryear.
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Old 07-10-2018, 07:34 PM   #144
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

test test test
will a reader please tell me how to post big pictures. all I manage is thumbnail transfers.
?????????????????????????????????????????????????? ????????????????????????????????
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Old 07-11-2018, 01:52 AM   #145
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

testing again and again.
Trying to get a big picture attached.


Painted Silo at Devenish Victoria.

Depicts war nurses, old uniform and new.
The poppies are from Flanders Fields where soldiers bodies lay.
Here is the first line of the poem.

In Flandersfields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below


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Old 07-11-2018, 05:26 AM   #146
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Silos at Brim.
Yarriambiack Shire. Victoria
Shire population 6,600 and has a land area of 740,000.sq.km. An agricultural area which is mainly grain growing and thus the silos. Like other places in Australia and indeed around the world, being remote and agricultural means the community is conservative, supportive, loyal to each other and accustomed to drought and other hardships.


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Old 07-11-2018, 05:48 AM   #147
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silos at Brim Victoria.
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Old 07-11-2018, 08:25 AM   #148
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