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Old 07-29-2020, 12:03 PM   #1
revenski
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Default Hard Starting - Fuel Line Issues

I have my ’38 Tonner on which I did a Concours level restoration. Therefore, it has a 6-volt electrical system, a mechanical fuel pump and a Stromberg 97 carburetor. Needless to say, it doesn’t get driven a whole lot. When I don’t start it for a while, it is often difficult to start since there may be little if any gas in the carburetor bowl. I have often had to disconnect the gas supply line at the carb and fill the bowl. Although this is not something I prefer to do, this usually works. However, I went to start the truck the other day, and it was a no go even after multiple rounds of priming the carb. The truck would run until the bowl went dry, but that was as far as I could get. I checked all of the lines, changed the gas in the tank, and played with it for quite a while, and everything seemed fine. I did need to recharge the battery in between all of the attempts. I eventually got the truck to run after filling the carb bowl yet once again. I took the truck out for a short ride, and all was well.
I have read much of what is in the Barn forums, and I realize that this kind of starting issue is not entirely uncommon. My question is: short of installing a “secondary” electric fuel pump to get the gas started on its way up to the carburetor, is there something else I could or should be doing?
When I get the truck started, it always runs great. So things work well after the start.
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Old 07-29-2020, 03:17 PM   #2
JayChicago
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Default Re: Hard Starting - Fuel Line Issues

Don’t know if this even applies to your toner, but.....
I’ve read that a common place to “suck air” is at the gasket on the fuel filter bowl.
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Old 07-29-2020, 03:25 PM   #3
JT FORD
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Default Re: Hard Starting - Fuel Line Issues

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Originally Posted by JayChicago View Post
Don’t know if this even applies to your toner, but.....
I’ve read that a common place to “suck air” is at the gasket on the fuel filter bowl.
Right On, if there is a small leak at the bowl gasket it will not pump! The one time you fill the bowl maybe there was a leak and it didn't start. The last time it didn't leak and it runs.......When I prime a 94 holly I just remove the air cleaner and pour gas in the top of the carb.
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Old 07-29-2020, 03:26 PM   #4
revenski
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Default Re: Hard Starting - Fuel Line Issues

Thank you for the input. Everything is appreciated.
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Old 07-29-2020, 03:28 PM   #5
Kube
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Default Re: Hard Starting - Fuel Line Issues

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Originally Posted by revenski View Post
I have my ’38 Tonner on which I did a Concours level restoration. Therefore, it has a 6-volt electrical system, a mechanical fuel pump and a Stromberg 97 carburetor. Needless to say, it doesn’t get driven a whole lot. When I don’t start it for a while, it is often difficult to start since there may be little if any gas in the carburetor bowl. I have often had to disconnect the gas supply line at the carb and fill the bowl. Although this is not something I prefer to do, this usually works. However, I went to start the truck the other day, and it was a no go even after multiple rounds of priming the carb. The truck would run until the bowl went dry, but that was as far as I could get. I checked all of the lines, changed the gas in the tank, and played with it for quite a while, and everything seemed fine. I did need to recharge the battery in between all of the attempts. I eventually got the truck to run after filling the carb bowl yet once again. I took the truck out for a short ride, and all was well.
I have read much of what is in the Barn forums, and I realize that this kind of starting issue is not entirely uncommon. My question is: short of installing a “secondary” electric fuel pump to get the gas started on its way up to the carburetor, is there something else I could or should be doing?
When I get the truck started, it always runs great. So things work well after the start.
As your engine "runs great" as you state, there is most likely little to be done to make it start great. There is ZERO need for an electric pump on a properly built and maintained fuel system.
Places I'd check :
* flex fuel line. Often they look good but suck air through the "body" of the hose. Remove it, put your finger over one end and suck on the other. Put your tongue on that end. The vacuum should hold your tongue in place for a bit. If not, the hose is at least partly an issue to be dealt with.
You don't need one of those flex lines with built in check valves. There are valves in the fuel pump to keep the fuel where you desire it. Those "check valve" hoses are simply band-aids for those not wanting to correct the pump operation.
* fuel pump. The gasket at the top cover of the pump often leaks (vacuum). Finally, the screw that holds the cover on the fuel pump... if it was ever drawn down too tight, that can leak (vacuum).
* fuel pump (revisited) : check valves may not be seated properly. If you don't have the correct tools to do this, I'd suggest you have it done. Charlie Schwendler is my "go to" guy.
* hard fuel line between pump and carb: The ferules at each end were soldered on authentic lines. Ford did this for a reason.
* hard line between tank and pump: Here too, the ferules were soldered. In my opinion, this line is even more important to have soldered ferules that the piece between the carb. and pump.
All of the above can add up to cause issues that I'd rather avoid entirely. Each is easily corrected.
My cars sit for weeks at a time and rarely, I mean rarely, require much more than one or perhaps two pumps of the throttle, pull the choke and within seconds, each starts.
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Old 07-30-2020, 07:30 AM   #6
richard crow
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Default Re: Hard Starting - Fuel Line Issues

a elec. pump with a switch is a good idea when the car sits for a long time . it reduce,s wear on the starter & batt life
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