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Old 10-22-2019, 09:37 AM   #1
DelPercio
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Default Drain plug

Trying to change transmission fluid on my car that has 3200 miles showing. The fill plug loosened easily but I canít get the drain plug off. Iím afraid to put heat on it because of all the oil underneath. Before I put a pipe wrench with a cheater bar I want to make sure itís left loose and right tight
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Old 10-22-2019, 09:53 AM   #2
Patrick L.
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Default Re: Drain plug

It is right hand thread. If the plug loosened easily then what is happening ? Why won't the plug come out ? I wouldn't be afraid of heating the transmission case or plug.
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Old 10-22-2019, 09:55 AM   #3
DelPercio
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Default Re: Drain plug

The fill plug loosened easily but the drain plug even with some oil dripping off of it won’t loosen.
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Old 10-22-2019, 11:49 AM   #4
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Default Re: Drain plug

Turn left to take out. Someone over tightened nut. Do not use heat. Just use the “right” wrench. Take your time.
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Old 10-22-2019, 12:28 PM   #5
Patrick L.
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Default Re: Drain plug

Oops, my mistake. If its that tight still usually a big ass wrench along with a whack of a bigger hammer or cheater should break it loose.
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Old 10-22-2019, 12:28 PM   #6
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Default Re: Drain plug

sometimes seized components respond better with a sharp tap from a hammer onto the wrench rather than extended leverage
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Old 10-22-2019, 12:47 PM   #7
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Default Re: Drain plug

A little "percussive maintenance" should break it loose.


When in doubt, get a bigger hammer. And if that doesn't work the problem is electrical
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Old 10-22-2019, 03:33 PM   #8
DelPercio
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Default Re: Drain plug

Used a 10 inch adjustable wrench while hitting it with a hammer. I’m surprised it’s so tight because there’s oil dripping off of the plug. I think I’ll wipe it down good heat the plug then try a pipe wrench. Just wanted to make sure it’s a right hand thread.
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Old 10-22-2019, 03:42 PM   #9
Charlie Stephens
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Default Re: Drain plug

Quote:
Originally Posted by DelPercio View Post
Used a 10 inch adjustable wrench while hitting it with a hammer. Iím surprised itís so tight because thereís oil dripping off of the plug. I think Iíll wipe it down good heat the plug then try a pipe wrench. Just wanted to make sure itís a right hand thread.
The oil dripping is probably the clue. The previous person kept tightening it until the leak stoped (which it didn't). You will probably need at least a new plug. Maybe the threads in the plug were cut undersize by mistake. You might get by with thread sealent.

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Old 10-22-2019, 03:59 PM   #10
Don Turley
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Default Re: Drain plug

The drain plug is a right hand pipe thread. Since the pipe thread is tapered, and with the plug over-tightened and still leaking, it is possible that the transmission housing is cracked at the drain hole. Clean it good and check with a thinner liquid (water or mineral spirits) before filling with new oil only to find it is still leaking.
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Old 10-22-2019, 04:00 PM   #11
Patrick L.
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Default Re: Drain plug

Sounds like a bigger wrench and bigger hammer are needed. It usually takes a big sharp rap to get things moving. I also wouldn't be afraid to use big heat on the case around the plug.
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Old 10-22-2019, 08:04 PM   #12
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Default Re: Drain plug

good opportunity to purchase a 12" or 15" adjustable wrench
You probably need to start with a bigger wrench.
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Old 10-22-2019, 08:21 PM   #13
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Default Re: Drain plug

This sounds all too familiar to me. A previous owner had cross-threaded the drain plug and responded to the resulting leak by twisting the plug so tight that he cracked the case, which allowed for even more leakage. I had bought this car as a "barn-find" and soon after found the transmission to be completely empty of oil. I hope your situation is not a bad as mine.
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Old 10-23-2019, 02:38 AM   #14
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Default Re: Drain plug

My first choice would be an 8 point socket to fit the square head of the plug and an impact wrench. Hopefully the square isn't all rounded over from removal attempts. If it is, a pipe wrench is probably your best bet. Likely you'll find it cross threaded and/or a cracked case. Good luck.
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Old 10-23-2019, 07:40 AM   #15
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Default Re: Drain plug

To take drain plugs off, I have a set of square drive sockets that I use where one (can't remember the size) fits perfectly. No rounding it off then.
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Old 10-23-2019, 07:40 AM   #16
Joe K
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Default Re: Drain plug

If the crack does not "extend" - the transmission can be removed, the contents taken out, cleaned and blasted, and either brazed, or simply paint the inside with "Glyptol" which is a red paint-like substance used frequently in electric motor rebuilds.

Formally an "insulating varnish" Glyptol is alcohol based, paints on, and once set is IMPERVIOUS to oil. Many race car internals are painted with Glyptol simply to seal the cast iron case-work against foundry grit coming loose inside the case and ruining an engine or gear train. It keeps the box cleaner in service (cleanliness is next to longevity in machines) and makes service and subsequent cleaning faster and easier.

Glyptol has some inherent flexibility - its used on electrical windings which can move under the magnetic flux of a motor - so when you reinsert the plug and tighten, even though you may spread the crack a bit, the Glyptol will likely bridge it and seal.

Brazing may be a possibility for repair - but like me trying to braze a cracked iron pot, once the crack starts it may be impossible to stop - you may chase that crack all the way up into the bearing recesses - in which case it's junk.

New cases are around. I have at least two extra transmission cases here. You'll pay more for shipping than the case and possibly the entire transmission will sell for at an antique auto flea market.

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Old 10-23-2019, 07:44 AM   #17
Patrick L.
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Default Re: Drain plug

Problem with a crack, stop drill it.
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Old 10-23-2019, 10:38 AM   #18
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Default Re: Drain plug

First, hit the end of the plug a few good blows w/a fair sized hammer, then work on turning it.
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Old 10-23-2019, 01:20 PM   #19
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Default Re: Drain plug

I wouldn't beat on the drain plug too hard .

Cast iron threads don't give like steel threads .

Replacing the transmission case isn't an easy job .

The back end would have to be removed first . .

I would use the pipe wrench .

If the handle of your wrench is too short , slip a longer pipe over the handle for added leverage .

Be careful not to jerk of knock the model A off of the stands while you are under it .

If heat is used , heat the case around the drain plug rather than the plug its self like Patric k L suggests .

If the plug is first heated , expansion from the heat can also cause the drain plug to expand and get tighter .

Last edited by Purdy Swoft; 10-23-2019 at 01:27 PM.
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Old 10-23-2019, 03:09 PM   #20
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Default Re: Drain plug

When in doubt, get a bigger hammer. And if that doesn't work the problem is electrical [/QUOTE]



That's Priceless !!!!!
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