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Old 07-23-2019, 11:24 PM   #61
Chris Haynes
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Default Re: The Terry Burtz 5 main bearing engine blocks are back on track.

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Originally Posted by California Travieso View Post
Hey Chris,

Will it be ready for the San Fernando Valley Model A Swap Meet? It would be nice to see it and hear it run.

At least you should make a YouTube video like Charlie Yapp did for the Cyclone head.

David Serrano
Probably not as it is too damn hot to work on it.
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Old 07-23-2019, 11:28 PM   #62
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Default Re: The Terry Burtz 5 main bearing engine blocks are back on track.

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Originally Posted by johnneilson View Post
Chris,


sounds like it will be a good running motor.

the head was not included in the cost mentioned? right?

curious on the "B" crank mod to fit in "A" block, also is it cross drilled to feed the rods?

thanks, John
I bought the head well over a decade ago. They are now obsolete as Charlie has stopped producing them. I also had he flywheel, harmonic balancer on hand. I know that Joe Sivils built the engine for pressure oiling. I'll have to ask him about the crank.
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Old 07-24-2019, 07:10 AM   #63
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Default Re: The Terry Burtz 5 main bearing engine blocks are back on track.

When I rebuilt my engine and had it bored out .040, the machine shop would not begin the process of boring and honing until they had the new pistons to mic. Would the new engine need to dismantled, bored and honed?
thanks
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Old 07-24-2019, 12:26 PM   #64
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Default Re: The Terry Burtz 5 main bearing engine blocks are back on track.

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When I rebuilt my engine and had it bored out .040, the machine shop would not begin the process of boring and honing until they had the new pistons to mic. Would the new engine need to dismantled, bored and honed?
thanks
He is not making a complete engine. Block, crank, and rods.


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Old 07-24-2019, 12:53 PM   #65
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Default Re: The Terry Burtz 5 main bearing engine blocks are back on track.

"He is not making a complete engine. Block, crank, and rods."

Who's engine are you referring to? This thread has turned away from the original title.

The Terry Burtz engine will have a machined block with a machined crankshaft with machined rods to fit the block.
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Old 07-24-2019, 03:09 PM   #66
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Default Re: The Terry Burtz 5 main bearing engine blocks are back on track.

Again, this is not an update, but I will try to answer some questions.

Many questions ask about price. I cannot answer because I am not involved in negotiations with the factory. All I can say is that the new engine price will be competitive with a rebuilt engine that has inserts, crankshaft counterweights, connecting rods with inserts, and is balanced.




Hi Terry
Glad to see your project is moving again. Do you know Tod Buttermore? He is also just about to start production on his new model a engine. I'm not sure there is enough market to handle 2 new model a engine blocks. You might want to contact him and see if you can work together and build on fantastic new block.
Thanks, Eric


After the project stalled in California due to lack of quality control, inability to follow a procedure, and spiraling cost, I contacted Tod in Jan. 2015 in an attempt to work with him. Although we are competitors, we have no animosity. Pasted below is our Emails.

Tod Buttermore <revc351@yahoo.com>
Fri 1/16/2015 9:57 AM

Terry,

I took a quick look at the pattern pictures and I would have to say that none of the foundries around me could use that tooling as it is. Given the work load I have, I don't think I would have time in the foreseeable future to be of any help to you. I would think there has to be a foundry closer to your home that can do that casting. The only reason my foundry can do anything for me is because I am involved. Sorry for the let down.

Tod

Tod Buttermore <revc351@yahoo.com>
Tue 1/13/2015 4:09 AM
Terry,
Email received. I will look at the pictures and give you my assessment.
Tod

On Tuesday, January 13, 2015 12:20 AM, Terry <terryandgus@hotmail.com> wrote:
Hi Tod,
It was good talking with you about the New Model A Engine Project.
I have been working with Lodi Iron Works. When their only technical person in the office retired, this project shifted to the back burner.
Engineering is based on the original Ford drawings of the cylinder block, crankshaft, and connecting rod.
SolidWorks and rapid-prototyping were used to create "masters". These masters were then used to create the foundry tooling.
The machined castings are documented with SolidWorks.
The tooling has produced several good castings if you don't count foundry screw-ups like failure to dry the water based mold wash, failure to fully engage core prints, interrupting the pour which caused a cold shut, etc. Only one good cylinder block without screw-ups has been cast, and that cannot be repeated because the personnel working on the floor that made the good casting are no longer employed at Lodi Iron Works.
The tooling pictures are located in my skydrive. You can access them from the link below:
http://1drv.ms/1dOxxFe
or
https://onedrive.live.com/redir?resi...=folder%2c.JPG
At Lodi Iron Works, all core boxes were filled with PepSet with the exception of the water jacket core boxes.The water jacket core boxes were blown using IsoCure.
The last picture shows the pattern for the crankshaft and the next to last picture shows the aluminum match-plates for connecting rods and main caps that fit Lodi's automated molding line.
Over the next few days, I will send the core assembly procedure, pictures of assembled cores, pictures of castings, and pictures taken in the foundry.
I hope that we can work together to provide this new product to the Model A hobby.
Please reply so that I know that Email works and that you were able to view the skydrive pictures.
Terry Burtz



Hello Terry
I figured the engine project had stalled, and I'm glad to see you're back at it!
Will the block be cast iron?
Best regards, Carl


Yes, the cylinder block will be a cast iron. On drawing A-6015 Ford specified "A" iron. To keep costs at a minimum, instead of us specifying an antique alloy like "A" iron, the alloy chosen will be one that the factory uses for modern engine cylinder blocks.. The main bearing caps, connecting rods, and crankshaft will be a modern malleable iron, and again, it will be an alloy that the factory uses for modern engines. I have asked for properties of these alloys and will be happy to share them with anyone interested.



Good Morning Terry:
When you can quote either parts or and assembled short block please advise.
I have a “B” engine sitting on my Garage Floor but if this new engine were ready to go I think it would be the “real deal”.
Question
How would you handle Engine Block Numbers?
Thank you, Al


We are working with the factory to get quotes on parts, not a short block. The reason for not providing a short block is that most people want to choose the valve train that they want, choose pistons that they want, choose cam and timing gears that they want, along with other variables. Many people also have a collection of parts on the shelf that is waiting for the next rebuild. Regarding engine block numbers, for quality control purposes, after a cylinder block passes final inspection, a unique sequential serial number will be stamped on the machined surface where the A-6017 "Cylinder timing gear cover side" is mounted. On an assembled engine, this number is hidden, but easily accessible by removing a few bolts. The pad above the water inlet on the side of the cylinder block will be blank unless you request that we stamp it. We have the correct stamps with the different numbers (depending on serial number), and we can stamp it for you.



How about creating a go Fund Me page or a Kickstarter page to fund this?
Anne


Thank you for your suggestion. Money is not the problem. Many people have offered to make a deposit, The problem is to find a competent manufacturing facility that can produce a quality product for an affordable price. The project stalled several years ago due to spiraling costs and lack of quality control.



________________________________________
Hello Terry, great to hear you are back on deck with this project. It must be 5 or 6 years since we visited you from New Zealand and you showed us your projects. I will be thrilled to buy one of your new blocks, and head too if you make that. Will the crankshaft go ahead too, or is it too early to say?
SAJ in NZ


For this project, the crankshaft and connecting rods are included. Any head can be used because all interfaces for attaching parts are exactly as original.





When I rebuilt my engine and had it bored out .040, the machine shop would not begin the process of boring and honing until they had the new pistons to mic. Would the new engine need to dismantled, bored and honed?
thanks


Nothing needs to be dismantled. The "new engine" consists of a fully machined cylinder block, connecting rods and a crankshaft. The Ford drawing for machining the cylinder block calls for the cylinders to be reamed to 3.873 to 3.874 inch diameter, and then rolled to 3.875 to 3.876 inch diameter. Rolling does not produce a very good surface for the rings, so the plan is to have a diameter between 3.875 and 3.876 inch diameter with a honed 45 degree cross-hatched surface finish. See the following for surface finish. https://www.hastingsmfg.com/ServiceT...efinishing.htm
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Old 07-24-2019, 03:14 PM   #67
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Default Re: The Terry Burtz 5 main bearing engine blocks are back on track.

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Originally Posted by denniskliesen View Post
"He is not making a complete engine. Block, crank, and rods."

Who's engine are you referring to? This thread has turned away from the original title.

The Terry Burtz engine will have a machined block with a machined crankshaft with machined rods to fit the block.
The pictures I posted are of Terry's test castings.
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Old 07-24-2019, 04:05 PM   #68
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Default Re: The Terry Burtz 5 main bearing engine blocks are back on track.

Terry,

Thanks for the detailed answers to the questions that have been posed. The clear and concise answers give a non-technical person like me a lot of confidence in your project and the product you will deliver.

David Serrano
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Old 08-19-2019, 01:25 PM   #69
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Default Re: The Terry Burtz 5 main bearing engine blocks are back on track.

I received the following progress update from Terry Burtz today:

-----------------------------------------------------

Hello to All,

19 August 2019


Updates

In case someone gets this Email without seeing the article on the new Model A engine, the article can be found at: http://www.modelaengine.com

If anyone has a question, concern, comment, or suggestion, please let me know at model.a.engine@hotmail.com and I’ll do my best to resolve the issue.


New Engine

This project started in 2007 and stalled in 2015 because of sky-rocketing cost and the lack of quality control at foundries in California.

Previous updates, pictures, and videos can be found at: http://www.modelaengine.com

Also see: https://www.fordbarn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=265782 for additional information.

I use the term "new engine" loosely because the only new parts are the cylinder block, crankshaft, and connecting rods. All interfaces for mating parts are identical to original and have been documented from original Ford drawings.

In the 2 July 2019 update, I was happy to state that the project was resurrected and I would be working with others to have the "new engine" manufactured in China at a factory that manufactures OEM parts for several customers.

The others that I will be working with include John, Bill, and Leonard. John has a company in Hong Kong and Virginia and has over 30 years of experience in having things manufactured in China and imported into the USA. One of John's products is a vintage cast iron 4-cylinder 3-main L-head cylinder block similar to a Model A cylinder block. John will be responsible for manufacturing and quality assurance. Bill will be responsible for accounting and disbursements. Leonard will be responsible for receiving orders and shipping the "new engines" to customers, and maintaining a list that ties customer names to the hidden serial number (part of quality assurance). I am the 4th member of the team and I will be responsible for everything related to engineering.

The 4 of us met at Leonard's home in Santa Ana, CA on the morning of Friday, August 16 to get to know each other and discuss our working relationships, and responsibilities. Leonard and his wife Kay were preparing for an annual meeting where the members of the Orange County Model A club, Southern California Oldsmobile Club and Antique Engine Club get together for a fun and educational meeting on Saturday, August 17.

After meeting with Leonard on Friday, John, Bill, and I retreated to the hotel where we were staying to have a 5-hour technical discussion regarding the new engine project. Many things were discussed including surface finishes, dimensional tolerances to 4 digits in certain areas, casting wall thickness, press and slip fits for dowel pins, hard exhaust valve seats, replaceable camshaft bearings, balancing, different alloys of iron (cast and ductile) that will be used for different parts, small parts that will be included like the dowel pins that locate the flywheel housing to the cylinder block, main bearing studs, and nuts, dowel pins in the crankshaft where the flywheel is attached, woodruff key for crankshaft timing gear, connecting rod wrist pin bushing, connecting rod bolts, and much more. Also discussed is the need for verification of design by third parties before the factory is turned on for production.

We talked about asking for a small quantity (6 sets of parts at most) for evaluation before production. One set of parts will be used for display and shown with pan rail up so people can see the 5 main bearings, crankshaft counterweights on both sides of each connecting rod, bosses for oil passages, rear main seal design, and many other features. The other sets of parts will be built by others for testing and evaluation.

John is a hands-on, grease under the fingernails type of guy who has a passion for detail and we can talk for hours about everything from Chinese culture and their way of doing things to the smallest technical detail.

On Saturday at Leonard's, I gave about an hour-long presentation to the attendees regarding the "new engine" which included features of the new design, history of problems with working with foundries in California, how the project stalled in 2015 because of the lack of quality control and spiraling cost increases, and how the project was resurrected when Leonard put me in contact with John. After I spoke, there was a question and answer discussion where the audience asked technical questions and I was happy to answer them.

The picture attached was taken while I was talking. I am wearing the straw hat by the "no speed limit" sign and John is wearing the white shirt and standing in front of the black toolbox.

John will be traveling to China in early September for technical discussions with the factory. If any questions arise, I am a phone call or email away.

Even with the added tariff on auto parts from China, our goal is to provide a quality product at an affordable price that is competitive with the cost of a rebuilt engine.

A deposit to cover 1/2 of the tooling cost has been made, and tooling is now being designed.


Cylinder Block

As mentioned in the 2 July 2019 update, 2 cylinder blocks were sent to China. One was original and the other was the one good casting made by Lodi Iron Works. In addition, SolidWorks files of the internal cores and machining were sent.

Although existing tooling has made cylinder blocks in 2 different foundries in California, all new tooling will be made in China. The reason for this is because the factory in China needs to assume full responsibility. The factory in China has been told that my SolidWorks files of the interior are for reference and can be modified as needed, however, the SolidWorks file for machining cannot be modified. If the factory in China were to use my tooling and/or interior SolidWorks files as is and had a problem, it could be argued that we gave them direction and that I was responsible for the problem.


Connecting Rod, Main Caps, and Crankshaft

These parts are much simpler than the cylinder block and they will be made of malleable iron. The 1932 Ford V-8 crankshaft was cast malleable iron, and most modern engines use malleable iron crankshafts.

SolidWorks models have been provided and the instructions to the factory in China is to follow the SolidWorks models.

Dimensional and balancing tolerances are being specified to be equal or exceed the tolerances on the Ford drawings.


Next Update

We are hopeful that we will have the first machined samples available by late fall and will send updates including pictures as the project matures.


Terry Burtz, Campbell, Calif.

.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Seminar Picture at Leonards.jpg (128.4 KB, 119 views)

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Old 08-21-2019, 12:19 AM   #70
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Default Re: The Terry Burtz 5 main bearing engine blocks are back on track.

Terry,


Thank you for the very informative update.


It sounds like you have really done your homework.


The Model A hobby is looking forward to having a source for good quality new upgraded engine components.


Chris W.
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Old 08-23-2019, 01:59 PM   #71
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Default Re: The Terry Burtz 5 main bearing engine blocks are back on track.

I want to thank everyone for Emailing encouraging comments and asking questions. Sometimes 2 or more people ask the same question. When this happens, I just pick one question to answer. Questions are unedited with the exception that I remove last names. It takes 2 days to send the updates by Email to contacts on my Email list because my free Hotmail account will only allow me send 500 BCC Emails in a 24 hour period, and I can only send 50 at a time.


Terry,
I see your back on the new engine. I have a few questions, first is what size are the main bearings @ inch like the B?, will it be oil pressurized? will the cam bores be larger than stock, are you going to use the Model B exhaust port design which flows better?
Thanks
Bill


All 9 bearing journals (rods and mains) on the crankshaft are specified to be between 2.0000 and 1.9990 inch diameter with .125 inch fillet radii. The insert chosen is used in GM engines built from 1955 to 2003. Front, center and rear mains use a pair of inserts. Intermediate mains (2 and 4) and connecting rods use a single insert. The insert is Sealed Power #2020CP. Do a Google search and you will find many sources.

Oil pressure will be supplied to all 9 crankshaft bearings. There are 5 camshaft bushings that are replaceable. The front, center, and rear camshaft bushings will have oil pressure supplied to them. The #2 and #4 camshaft bushings will block off the drilled oil passages. The engine builder will leave these passages blocked if using a 3 bearing camshaft. If using a 5 bearing camshaft, the bushings should be drilled to provide oil pressure.

Inside diameter of camshaft bushings is specified to be between 1.5615 and 1.5625 inch diameter which is stock Model A. If you wanted larger camshaft bores in the cylinder block for a higher lift camshaft, just remove the camshaft bushings and let the larger camshaft journals ride on the cast iron cylinder block like a stock Model A.

Exhaust ports are stock except that they have replaceable hard seats (MAHLE 218-7535). Intake ports have a streamlined flow path however they are stock size. Engine builders are usually concerned about intake port flow, not exhaust port flow. Intakes do not have hard seats so they can be enlarged by engine builders for larger valves.

More can be found at http://www.modelaengine.com



Hi Terry,
Great news. I think it’s really going to happen this time it sounds like you connected with the right people.
I attended one of your seminars at your house after one of the castings came back
and saw first hand what your doing.
My comment is that maybe you should also consider a flywheel as the counter weights add some mass that could be taken out of the flywheel and it would also be nice to have it made to take the modern diaphragm clutch people are using.
The flywheel cost would probably be in line with what it costs to lighten and modify
A stock one.
Thanks for getting going again,
Dodge



My fingers are crossed in anticipation that the design will become reality. I believe that we have the right team to pull this off. A much lighter weight flywheel will be our next project. John, our team member that is responsible for manufacturing and quality assurance has flywheels manufactured in China for another application. For some unknown reason to me, Ford cast Model A flywheels in a vertical position instead of horizontal. If you were to lighten a stock flywheel, porosity (on the side that was up while casting) is always opposite to the balance hole. We will cast flywheels horizontally with the ring gear side up so any porosity will be on the ring gear side. Our new flywheel will also have the ring gear support shoulder on the other side of the ring gear so that engagement of the Bendix will not apply forces that want to remove the gear instead of pushing it harder against the shoulder.



Hi Terry, nice to see that you are making progress on the motor. My local foundry have just completed a totally new design for twelve cylinder Ferrari cylinder heads, also new inlet
manifold for six webber ( special short Ferrari type) outstanding job. They are also casting V8 85 twin spark cylinder heads from original patterns.
If you have any further trouble give them a call. Mr Robin Hyhof, Giltec Catings Dunedin.
They have done some complex castings for me in both alloy and bronze.
Cheers,
Ken



That sounds like a very capable foundry in New Zealand. Thank you for the contact information. Unfortunately, Model A people are cheap and cannot afford the same things that Ferrari people throw money at.




Hello Terry

Congratulations on getting your engine project going again. Will the new blocks accommodate five-bearing camshafts like the early 1928 Model As? That would provide better cam support for running overheads.

In the past you mentioned using roll pins to index the bearing caps to the engine block. Are they sufficiently stable compared to dowel pins?

Best regards,--Carl



See the answer to Bill at the beginning where I talked about 5 cam bushings, replaceable cam bushings, oil pressure, removing cam bushings for a higher lift camshaft, etc.

Instead of roll pins, I specified 1/8 inch diameter x 3/8 inch long dowel pins (McMaster Carr 98381A470). The cylinder block will have a press fit and the main cap will have a slip fit.

Roll pins are nice because hole diameters do not need to be as precise.



Terry,
Thank you for the update. I. Appreciate being kept in the loop. Perhaps thus would make a great mate fir our Cyclone A-B Cylinder Head.
Thx
Kevin



All stock interfaces for attached parts have been documented from Ford drawings so any after-market parts will work if they fit a stock Model A engine.



I wouldn't be surprised if someone builds one of these up with a supercharger and electronic fuel injection. A cast steel crank option would be good for that. Gregg


Iron foundries usually pour cast iron and malleable iron alloys. Steel parts are usually poured in a different foundry. It could be done but at a higher cost.





Terry
Will assembly be in China? Or US?
Joe.



The "New Engine" consists of a cylinder block, crankshaft, and 4 connecting rods.
These will be loose parts and the engine builder will have his choice of pistons, rings, camshaft, valve train, timing gears, insert bearings, etc.

The only assembly that will be done in China is wrist pin bushings in the connecting rods, dowel pins at the connecting rod cap interface, camshaft bushings in the cylinder block. 10 dowel pins in the cylinder block for main cap indexing, 2 dowel pins in cylinder block to align flywheel housing, 4 hard seats in the cylinder exhaust ports, 2 dowel pins in the crankshaft for flywheel alignment, and the Woodruff key in the crankshaft.



Is there a real need for camshaft bearings? Will the crank be hardened so it won't wear in the bearing areas? Will the main and rod bearings be available "off the shelf", i.e. small block Chevy or similar, or special made for your engine? Jim



Modern engines have replaceable cam bearings, and that is why we chose to use them. For a stock engine with light valve spring pressure, cam bearings are not needed. If someone wanted to make a new camshaft with higher lift lobes, the camshaft bearings could be removed and the larger camshaft journals on the new camshaft would ride on the cast iron cylinder block.

The crankshaft will have the same material and heat treat as similar crankshafts being made.

Front, center and rear mains use a pair of inserts. Intermediate mains (2 and 4) and connecting rods use a single insert. The insert is Sealed Power #2020CP which is used in many 4,6, and 8 cylinder engines and they were used from 1955 until 2003. The inserts are very common and they were used in small block Chevy's and many other engines. They are available at most any auto parts store and even from Amazon and Ebay.
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Old 08-25-2019, 08:48 PM   #72
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Default Re: The Terry Burtz 5 main bearing engine blocks are back on track.

Dear Terry,
I have extremely limited experience of Chinese made parts but I understand that they can be less than rigorous when it comes to materials to the point where you may get a part that machines like cheese, or glass. I’m very impressed with your persistence and progress so far and as a Model A parts seller and restorer I’m very interested in your blocks.
Best Wishes, Rob


Parts made in China without good quality control can have the problems that you describe. The factory that has been selected specializes in the manufacture of cylinder blocks and other engine components, and they have excellent quality control. John (our team member responsible for manufacturing and quality assurance) will not accept anything unless it meets our requirements.




HI Terry,
Thanks for the update.
I have a question re the new engine, are you intending for it to have a fully pressurized oiling system?
Regards Peter


Yes, all 9 crankshaft bearings and all camshaft bearings will be supplied with oil under pressure. The crankshaft is also drilled to provide oil to the connecting rod bearings.

There are many other changes, and I encourage you to check out
http://www.modelaengine.com





My name is Stephen ,I. Own and drive a 1928 Model A Ford .
Just finishing a long drive Toronto to Nova Scotia about 3000 km .
Wish some how this engine could be made in the USA . I am a aircraft mechanic and
tolerances in my field are close. A lot of the after market parts are made in China
under Fords blessings .Much of it I buy from the. Mac. Snyder’s Burt’s these parts are
terrible /fit / longevity ,now you want them to build an engine I find that a Bit?
Got to be a way to keep the price and Jobs in AMERICA. and not to drive this engine off shore.
After three engine overhauls finally found one In Stokie ‘s that giving me the milage.
But I would like to buy an engine that a do not need to bring a tool chest with me..




I would be happy to have this engine produced in the USA, and tried to work with manufacturers in the USA for several years. When costs started spiraling upwards (from $800 to $2400) for just a raw cylinder block casting and there was no quality assurance to guarantee that the casting would not be full of porosity or have core shift, I put the project on hold in May 2015 because it became unaffordable (unless you want to spend $8000 or more). The project was revived as told in the previous (June) update when the team of John, Bill, Leonard, and myself agreed to revive it and make it affordable. John will be responsible for manufacturing and quality assurance. He has over 30 years of experience manufacturing parts (including iron cylinder blocks and other automobile parts) and is familiar with 4-place dimensional tolerances and quality control requirements.

The industry of casting and forging iron and steel has moved to third world countries, and that is where we had to go.

Ford does not bless and has no control over the terrible fitting aftermarket parts that you mention. For a fee, you can use the trademarked Ford oval and name on your product and packaging. Ford does not approve any design documentation for the part and has no control regarding quality control.





Hi Terry,
Receiving this latest update is very encouraging and exciting as a Model A guy.
Please add me to your email list, I get the emails through a Model A friend.
Have been following your project for several years and tried to find casting guys on the East coast to no avail.

Sounds like the team you've been fortunate to assemble is finally on the trail you had hoped for in you vision of an A engine upgrade.

I'm an electrical Eng by training and a mechanical engineer through my auto passion that has led me to be a manufacturing engineer in my present career.
As such, If at all possible I would love the opportunity to be one of your early Alpha customers to provide feedback on everything from fit/function/ integrity and overall performance.

Sad as it is, It does seem as if china and India are the only places that can do iron castings these days from what I can find out talking to casting source contacts I've made.

Best regards, best of luck in this new and exciting chapter of a modern A engine

Please feel free to ask if there is someway I can help you

Paul



Thanks for the encouraging words. Your observations regarding trying to find foundries on the East coast is the same on the West coast. During WW2 there were many shipyards around San Francisco Bay that were producing Liberty ships and others at a rate that was greater than the Axis powers could sink them. All of these ships required tons of iron castings that were poured and machined locally. Today, all of the shipyards, foundries and large machine shops are all gone.



Good day Terry,
Terry, if there is anything I can do to help, please feel free to ping me. I have been following your project for years.
I am interested in the project, I would love to contribute, I am willing to pre-order and pay for components, build and field test engines and provide field feed-back, I am not looking for anything but to help, I have a love for the hobby and have been running Model A’s for over 40 years. I am an avid car collector/builder and have built cars for museums and individuals, ranging from early Corvettes, vintage Chryslers, Chevys and of course Model A’s, as-well as hot-rods and vintage aircraft, I am a licensed Airframe/Engine tech and Pilot.

I am interested in field testing (I have several Model A’s that I can swap engines into), it’s common for me to tour for hundreds of miles on a single tour with the club that I am charter member of (the Worcester County Model A Club). Therefore it would not take long to begin to see field testing results. I have Model A’s with Mitchel Over-Drives, I could feedback results of performance with and without over-drives. I typically run Model B engines with the 40% bob-weight c-balance crank and 6.5:1 compression and all the Model B accessories. I would build engines at the horsepower you deem necessary for testing, whether it be mild or not, I would think most interested parties would be looking for something around 55/65hp, with an engine that can run at as much as 5000rpm, the Model A would comfortable when cruising at 2000 to 2500rpm, its perfect.

If there is anything I can do to help, please do not hesitate, I manage an ISO 17025 accredited dimensioned measuring laboratory, we hold temperature to 680F +/- 10F, therefore we know a little bit about measuring artifacts to exceedingly tight tolerances, including all sorts of hard dimensional gages, right down to good-old Gageblocks, our measuring capabilities are virtually unlimited, attributes such as; heights, parallel, squareness, bore size, lengths, pin diameter, Etc., Etc., is not a problem, and typically to six decimal places, or more. We also work with force, pressure and electronics, oven surveys, as-well-as others, for the sake of conversation.

Have a good day, and thanks for taking the time to see this project through, and thanks for taking the time to read this note. Ralph



Thank you for commenting. We are looking for independent third-party verification of the design. You have the skill-set that we are looking for.




Thanks Terry,
I hope this goes well for you.
My Son Tony is purchasing the machine shop from me but I am still doing R&D on new performance products. I have something I would like to ask and that would be an off the shelf tappet or lifter seems it’s getting harder to get adjustable lifters the problem is they should have a minimum foot of 1-1/8 or better yet the B lifter size of 1-3/16 that allows for better cam profile designs. I believe on the larger cam bore that will give me more room for profile design also.

Second question is oil pumps, are you bringing the oil out through a filter first with you insert bearing?
Thanks
Bill



All stock interfaces including the lifter bores are the same as an original Model A Ford cylinder block.

We are planning to make other parts in the future and will look at making an adjustable tappet with a larger diameter foot. Right now, we have our hands full with the cylinder block, crankshaft, and connecting rods.

Regarding oil circulation, a new "Oil Pump Drive Bearing" A-6560 will be provided. The new A-6560 is secured with a setscrew and will block off oil.

In the valve chamber, there is a horizontal passage (Full-length oil galley) between lifter bosses and cylinders that feeds oil to all crankshaft and camshaft bearings.

Oil can take one of two paths. For a stock unfiltered engine, there is a horizontal passage behind the 1/8 inch pipe plug on the side of the cylinder block which leads to a vertical passage which connects to the full-length oil galley. For a filtered engine, the horizontal passage behind the 1/8 inch pipe plug is plugged with a setscrew and all oil exits through the 1/8 inch plug. From there, oil goes through a filter and returns to the engine through the lower bolt of the "Cylinder Timing Gear Cover Side" (A-6017) which connects to the full-length oil galley.

Last edited by Terry Burtz, Calif; 08-25-2019 at 09:40 PM.
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