Go Back   The Ford Barn > General Discussion > Model A (1928-31)

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-06-2015, 06:42 PM   #1
BenLeBlanc
Member
 
BenLeBlanc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Chelmsford MA
Posts: 36
Default Model A Emergency brake cross shaft removal

Well, interesting situation here. I have a weird mix of years which is why I did not put it in the title. My frame and engine numbers tell me that my engine and frame were made in April 1930 ish. Trying to take my cross shaft off for cleaning, I realized that it is a 31 style. So, side question, what year is my car?

Main question here: how do you remove the shaft? I believe my brass bearings are pretty much seized to the shaft, and I have not been able to remove the pins yet, although I know I will have to. Any tricks?
__________________
----Benjamin LeBlanc
BenLeBlanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2015, 07:19 PM   #2
rocket1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Midland Park,N.J.
Posts: 955
Default Re: Model A Emergency brake cross shaft removal

the pins are tough to get out,slit the old bushings to remove,check shaft for major wear,if it looks pretty good install split bushings.
rocket1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)
Old 05-06-2015, 11:10 PM   #3
RonC
Senior Member
 
RonC's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 1,841
Default Re: Model A Emergency brake cross shaft removal

You have an April1930 car and should be titled as a 1930 Ford. In May 1930 they started the switch to the last style 30-31 instrument panel. Get a copy of the ford service bulletins for model a and the model a judging standards. Your cross shaft is the correct 30-31 style. The earlier 29 style was phased out by April.

Last edited by RonC; 05-07-2015 at 04:37 AM.
RonC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2015, 05:58 AM   #4
tmiller6
Senior Member
 
tmiller6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Livonia, MI
Posts: 170
Default Re: Model A Emergency brake cross shaft removal

My ’31 also had a bound up emergency brake shaft. I was able to clean it up so it now works beautifully. I removed both bushing retainer plates and sanded the shaft clean inboard of both bushings. I then sprayed the shaft and bushings with penetrating oil. I tapped the shaft sideways so that one bushing now started sliding inboard onto the clean area of the shaft. This also created a gap between the other bushing and the frame rail on the opposite side. I was able to slip an open end wrench into this gap and then I repeated the tapping process on the other side of the shaft.
By patiently working back and forth and inserting more spacers, I was able to drive both bushings onto the cleaned area of the shaft and I cleaned and greased the original bearing surface. After I did this, the bushings slid back in place easily and I didn’t have to resort to removing the levers or rivets.
tmiller6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2015, 07:01 AM   #5
Kevin in NJ
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: South East NJ
Posts: 3,165
Default Re: Model A Emergency brake cross shaft removal

The later style of E brake shaft that goes through the frame have the ends held on by taper pins. They need to be beat out in the correct direction.

Contrary to popular belief, the original bushings were not designed to need lubrication. The ball shape bushings are not designed to be tight tolerance bushings. They are more of something to keep the shaft in place and allow the frame to flex. The steel or pot metal balls have a graphite impregnated brass/ cloth interior surface. They would have fit fairly snug to the shaft. There purpose was to allow the shaft to not bind, keep it in place and not allow for rattles.

The few E brake shafts I have seen do not have wear. My guess is you have rust on the shaft and it is possible the bushings are not bad enough where you need to replace them. But first look at them and see what you have, as I said some are pot metal and the pot metal can be bad. If they are tight on the shaft then I would guess they are not that bad. In my limited experience I found getting the pins out was not so bad once you figured out the narrow end. I would sand the shaft inboard of both bushings and then work them into the sanded area. Then you can sand the shaft to allow removing them nicely.

Remember that both brake shafts use the same bushings. Neither should be lubricated with any type of lubricant that will get hard over time or attract dirt. Keep in mind, contrary to the article, Ford did not forget a grease fitting. I loaded the good originals (I had one NOS too) I used with graphite and put them back in place. The brass ones being sold today will need a lubricant.
__________________
Cabriolet and Technical Hints
Kevin in NJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2015, 04:35 PM   #6
Brent
Senior Member
 
Brent's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Salt Lake City
Posts: 126
Default Re: Model A Emergency brake cross shaft removal

Kevin (or anyone else) can you tell me how to identify the correct direction to drive the pins out? I'm about to delve into that, tonight.
Brent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2015, 09:26 PM   #7
Ed Wendell
Senior Member
 
Ed Wendell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 146
Default Re: Model A Emergency brake cross shaft removal

Brent,
See if you can lightly sand each end of the pin enough to determine which end is smaller. The smaller end is the one you want to tap on with a pin punch.
Ed
Ed Wendell is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Sponsored Links (Register now to hide all advertisements)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:54 AM.