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Old 05-15-2021, 01:35 PM   #1
HenryCarl
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Default no advice needed, but I am curious

After 51 years when I turned my Grandfather's '35 off, my wife's cousin examined it, did some repairs (new spark plugs wires, etc.) distributor cleaning and, of course, a new gas tank, and restarted it. And it had been 25 years before that when it was first turned off.

When we had a celebration of the puff of accumulated exhaust dust and mouse living quarters detritus...before it ran and purred...we decided two or three days later to take turns starting it up with the hand crank.

And three of us did.

I wonder how many can claim that.
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Old 05-15-2021, 02:04 PM   #2
tubman
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Default Re: no advice needed, but I am curious

I had a '48 Seagrave open cab pumper with the Pierce-Arrow 468 cubic inch flathead V12. I won a lot of beers betting guys I could start it with the crank. It was kind of unfair, because the engine had dual ignitions, and the more cylinders they have (up to a point) the easier they are to crank start. The easiest starting snowmobile I ever had was a 4 cylinder 2 stroke Yamaha. Twice as many firing impulses per revolution than the standard twin cylinder model.
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Old 05-15-2021, 02:28 PM   #3
51 MERC-CT
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Default Re: no advice needed, but I am curious

My father taught me when I was about 10 years old how to crank start his former '36 police car.
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Old 05-15-2021, 04:54 PM   #4
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Default Re: no advice needed, but I am curious

A couple years ago, while stopped at a small market in hardscrabble Eastern Oregon, I watched as a guy walked out with a sixer of beer, opened the door of a 1940's Chevrolet pickup, pulled out a hand crank, and proceeded to crank it started with only one jerk on the handle. He did this with such nonchalance that I assumed this to be normal for a guy that didn't need no stinkin' starter.
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Old 05-16-2021, 07:12 AM   #5
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Default Re: no advice needed, but I am curious

Fun stuff everyone. I remember my Uncle John crank starting his Case tractor when the battery was too weak to roll it. Fired on the 3rd pull.
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Old 05-16-2021, 07:28 AM   #6
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Default Re: no advice needed, but I am curious

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Not quite the same, but my 24 Model T had been sitting for 56 years and it started (with the starter). We spent 15 min on it one day, decided to replace the carb and with the replacement carb and about 15 min of trying, it started. I had cleaned and re-gapped the old plugs and cleaned the connections on the old wiring, and replaced the battery cables,but that was about it. And changed the oil. :-)
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Old 05-16-2021, 09:19 AM   #7
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Default Re: no advice needed, but I am curious

After some effort to finally get my 59A style V-8 running, which had not run in about 25 years, my friend and I wanted to see if it would start by cranking. We were surprised to see how easily it started. To our amazement it took only about 1/4 of a turn and fired right up!
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Old 05-16-2021, 09:58 AM   #8
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Default Re: no advice needed, but I am curious

When cranking there is no starter taking juice from the ignition. Ignition gets full voltage from the battery
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Old 05-16-2021, 10:24 AM   #9
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Default Re: no advice needed, but I am curious

Quote:
Originally Posted by slowforty View Post
When cranking there is no starter taking juice from the ignition. Ignition gets full voltage from the battery
When my father taught me how to crank his car, it was not for the fun of it but because the battery was dead. Was more likely to get full voltage from the generator.
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Old 05-16-2021, 02:27 PM   #10
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Default Re: no advice needed, but I am curious

I would like to try this but first I need to f nd a crank for my 34 V8
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Old 05-16-2021, 04:04 PM   #11
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Default Re: no advice needed, but I am curious

I look forward to trying this on my '36 Pickup... I'll have to search the classifieds for a crank starter for sale?
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Old 05-16-2021, 07:01 PM   #12
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Default Re: no advice needed, but I am curious

I made two cranks out of electrical ground rods. Two 90 degree bends and a drilled hole in the end for a cross pin and you are done. They are just long enough to clear the bumper.

Last edited by MGG; 05-16-2021 at 09:03 PM. Reason: spelling
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