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Old 08-30-2017, 02:17 PM   #1
leo
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Question Cutting and Swedging, the Right Tools Please.

I'm going to remove two bad hub bolts from a rear drum and I've read most of the posts regarding the topic. A couple of questions regarding the tools. It appears that a 9/16 hole saw will do the job of cutting out the swedged part of the bolt to free it from the drum. There are many of these on Amazon or Ebay and I would consider a name like Irwin, Bosch or DeWalt. There are also carbide hole cutters which are more expensive. Preferences on these? Regarding the swedging tool that Brattons or Snyder's sell for less than $10.00, I read some posts saying that they could not take the pressure required to do the job and failed in the process. Your experiences please.
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Old 08-30-2017, 02:38 PM   #2
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Default Re: Cutting and Swedging, the Right Tools Please.

Have a pro shop do it. It takes a huge press to swedge those babies correctly. I can't remember the ton pressure, but it's big, and most guys don't have a press that size. Maybe you do, though.
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Old 08-30-2017, 02:46 PM   #3
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Default Re: Cutting and Swedging, the Right Tools Please.

Hi 700rpm, I plan to have a shop do the swedge as I don't have a 40 ton press. But I'm concerned if I don't provide some support like the right instructions and swedging tool they may "f" it up!
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Old 08-30-2017, 02:50 PM   #4
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Default Re: Cutting and Swedging, the Right Tools Please.

It takes a 5/8" holesaw. A high dollar carbide tipped cutter isn't necessary. The name brand bi-metal ones work well. Taiwan special ones do not. You should remove the pilot drill bit in the hole saw as it is not necessary. The hole saw will pilot on the stud. One only needs to cut down about 1/16" of an inch or so to cut off the upset on the stud. A drill press makes this job easier but a hand drill will work. The studs may still need to be pressed out or persuaded out with a hammer. Be careful to not bend the hub when doing this by backing it up with some material around the stud being removed.

With regard to the tool available from the vendors, it will work for few studs. To replace all four drums, 20 studs, it is not made of a hardened steel for lasting use.

When pressing the stud to upset the shoulder, it takes approximately 22-24 tons of pressure. The stud must be backed up with some support such as a piece of pipe cut to fit. A 20 ton Harbor Freight press will not do the job. It takes a press good for 30 tons or more. Do not exceed the 24 ton limit as you may crack the drum with too much pressure. If too little pressure is used, the stud will be loose in the hub and drum.

If you are replacing the studs in a steel drum, be aware of the fact that most studs available today are for the thicker cast drums and are too long at the shoulder for the thinner steel drums. For the steel drums, you must find the older studs made for the steel drums only.
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Old 08-30-2017, 02:51 PM   #5
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Default Re: Cutting and Swedging, the Right Tools Please.

Need a 30 ton (min) press and a jig. Bratton's tool worked for me.
If going to Hershey there are better-safer options.
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Old 08-30-2017, 03:02 PM   #6
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Default Re: Cutting and Swedging, the Right Tools Please.

A hole saw should only be used if you are removing all five bolts and discarding the old drum with intentions of installing a new drum on the hub. The hole in the drum is cut on a taper / bevel, to allow the expansion of the shoulder of the new bolt. If you are only replacing two bolts, then take it to an automotive machine shop that can do the job.
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Old 08-30-2017, 03:07 PM   #7
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Default Re: Cutting and Swedging, the Right Tools Please.

Hi John, regarding the new studs and older steel drums, I had one of our most learned contributors tell me that the slightly longer shoulder means nothing and that he personally has pressed them on to steel drums with no modification required....
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Old 08-30-2017, 03:07 PM   #8
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Default Re: Cutting and Swedging, the Right Tools Please.

If you are reusing the drum you have to be careful not to cut the drum when
cutting the swage.

Bob
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Old 08-30-2017, 03:08 PM   #9
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Default Re: Cutting and Swedging, the Right Tools Please.

Hi, ccb360, better safer options? Like?
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Old 08-30-2017, 05:18 PM   #10
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Default Re: Cutting and Swedging, the Right Tools Please.

Don, the optimum verbiage..."That can do the job" without making a mess.
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Old 08-30-2017, 05:58 PM   #11
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Default Re: Cutting and Swedging, the Right Tools Please.

A TRUCK repair shop "might" be a possible option, to replace wheel studs.
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