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Old 02-11-2020, 12:56 AM   #1
trentclark
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Thumbs up Looking for a new job-maybe...

Hey, I've been on this forum for a year or so figuring out my 47 ford truck that I have owned for 40 years and have found everyone to be incredible with their help. This forum and site is worth millions of dollars in old parts which means billions in real dollars.

I am concerned that some in our forum are getting up in the years and I don't want their expertise to be lost with time. What are we going to do when some of these gentlemen decide to hang it up and quit commenting. Many of them still are providing much needed services to keep everyones old cars running. According to Hagerty the younger generation is really getting into the old cars and trucks and they will need old farts like us to ask questions and figure out 90 year old cars and trucks and keep them on the road. how do we keep this going?
I am 54 and built my first car from a pile of parts and didn't know crap about anything. I just asked a few old guys in the neighborhoods and my church what to do and they steered me to the solution. I drove the 47 ford truck till college and still have it today.

Who is going to be able to rebuild an 8BA, load-a-matic dizzy, 94 carb, or tranny and help these olds buckets of bolts on the road?
Just asking the question of how we keep this great passion, hobby and profession alive in the world of cell phones, Tesla's, social media and political BS.

I am looking to the future and want my Grand kids to see Granddads old truck and know how to keep it running when most cars are driving themselves at that point.

Lets pass the knowledge on to a younger generation. I'm 54 and hope to be working on cars at 100 and have told my 4 kids I will die happy when they find me dead hanging over a fender of an old ford truck.

Lets keep this alive. I have the time and financial blessing to visit anyone on this forum and learn from them. I plan to pass this on to the younger men somehow.

I will share more if I find out there is a consensus out there. I am a born leader, live by the Word of God, and ready to do whatever it takes to keep this passion alive. Thanks for listening to my rant. God bless you, the USA (and Britain-Mart) and Ford Flatheads, everywhere.
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Old 02-11-2020, 06:53 AM   #2
Mac VP
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Default Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

I’ve also thought about this question because of the general aging of some of the guys who are experts in various fields of early Ford restoration work. Guys like Dick Spadaro are gone and those still here on this earth are not immortal. My trusty assistant, Will Kimble, could take over doing early Ford 3 speed transmission rebuilding after I hang it up, but he’s pretty clear about not doing the overdrive transmissions. I’m in my later sixties and enjoy doing the overdrives but I don’t plan on doing these for 20 more years.

I’ve thought about offering to do a weekend training session for prospective transmission rebuilding guys but not a localized thing.....something that might involve a small but seriously interested group from around the country. Sort of a “spread the knowledge around” kind of thing so that our expertise won’t just sit in the Ohio area.

This may be just a pipe dream on my part but I’ve kept thinking about it. We hear from customers all over the country that they can’t find anyone in their area to work on their old Ford transmission, especially the overdrive transmissions.

I believe a similar problem is looming in other types of repair.....carburetor repair, distributor rebuilding, rear end work, and other specialties. The guys who have learned all the particulars of these things have, like us, made the mistakes of learning from scratch and became very good at what they now do. Will that knowledge be lost as we age and retire or pass on?
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Old 02-11-2020, 08:01 AM   #3
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Default Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

The major problem is that most doing it is downsizing and semiretired...so not exactly hiring.
And only way for most buisnesses is if a young guy gets 5+ years of aprenticeship and some kind of leasing deal to buy it out.
Young skilled people donīt have a ton of money...the people with a stack of money canīt see any fast gain in buying and lack skils...
So in reality we will probably see operations auctioned off and spread by the wind..
I have 2 good friends back in MN that have ask me to move there every visit...each with a fully running engine rebuilding operation...telling me building with inventory and their workmanship as long as they manage is for sale at bargain price....they struggle on just to not let the customers hanging with nowhere to go...and no one around seems interested in taking over.
Iīm pretty sure most of the people specialized in stuff would love to have a young person around training them but with all rules and regulations today itīs difficult.
And if they should pay them they have to turn up the pace...and not sure the demand is that high.
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Old 02-11-2020, 09:34 AM   #4
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Default Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

Take a quick look at G503.com site with the permanent sticky's and Jeepdraw and how it is laid out where people across North America and around the world post "How To". I had no one around that had any early jeep knowledge when I restored my 42 GPW and this site with all the information at my finger tips guided me through the process. I realize there are way more models of cars and trucks than jeeps and would be an enormous undertaking.

Just thinking out loud may be one way to preserve our hobby......
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Old 02-11-2020, 09:41 AM   #5
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Time will tell...........in the western New York area there are a few guys in the 45 to 55
year old range that are increasingly more involved. These are people who relish metal
working, lathes, milling machines CNC and the traditional type. They dig Flatheads
and making them run. I'll name a few if I may....Chad and Karl Schlifke, Jim and Geoff
Federspeil, Matt Weirtel, Matt Wendling, Dylon Watier and Andy Kolher ( the dropped

axle genius ) now residing in Cogan Station Pa. Another member here on the Barn....
Zach Shur from Grantville Pa. Right up on top is certainly Michael Driskell residing in
Tennesee. Lots more as well.
These guys build cars and run them hard..........
I'm pushing 80 and in the shop most everyday still building fuel, and spark
related parts and probably too many transmissions. I'll find time to finish up a customers 59L and my 286 8BA.........the good Lord willing.
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Old 02-11-2020, 09:44 AM   #6
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Default Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

I'm in the knowledge sharing stage. I do it via my videos. Limited knowledge, admittedly, but some have said that watching me muddle through things has inspired them to have a go.

Mart.
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Old 02-11-2020, 10:15 AM   #7
Seth Swoboda
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Default Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

I'm 39 and have been working on, rebuilding, restoring early Fords since I was 18. I learned a lot buy diving into the work, reading and asking questions of the jobs I needed to perform. There has been a lot of failure along the way but I learned from that. Experience is the best way to learn.

I have Mac VanPelts transmission book. I can successfully rebuild an early Ford 3 speed transmission. I have taken down and rebuilt many flathead V8 engines with success. I have 3 total body off frame restorations under my belt and still going. I can rebuild a carburetor and fuel pump. I have visited with Michael Driskell at Third Gen Automotive and watched him rebuild my banjo rear end. I feel pretty confident in my ability to keep my cars and truck on the road.

The Early Ford V8 Club as been addressing this issue for years now. The big problem is getting young folks involved in the hobby. One of the limiting factors is no doubt money. It takes a good investment in tools, equipment and parts to maintain and restore these great cars and trucks. For some of us this in not a problem. However, I know for a great many young folks they have the skill set but not the ability to make the investment. I have at times thought about all the money I've spent on my cars and how much more I could have put into my IRA. Believe me it's a lot.

Early Fords have a lot of competition for the attention of young people. The internet, the year round participation in sports programs for example. We live in a world of instant self gratification. The early Ford hobby doesn't necessarily fit that mold.

I'm not worried that the hobby and the guys with the skill set to repair them will become extinct. There will just become fewer of us. Eventually guys like Michael Driskell and myself will grab the reins and take over. To pass the knowledge and help other folks with their V8 Fords. Michael has already done so and I have done this locally on a smaller scale. We do need to get folks young and old involved when they show an interest. Get your V8 out on the road and drive it around your community. If your car is too nice to drive, buy another of driver status. Just get out there and be seen. Weather permitting I drive a V8 or Model A so often I'm well known in my community as the "old car guy". People just expect it of me, they stop and ask me questions and I engage.
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Old 02-11-2020, 10:15 AM   #8
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Default Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

I also encourage folks to join the Early Ford V8 Club. The club is a great way to interact with like minded V8 guys, pass along knowledge, tips and connect with folks that can help you maintain your V8 Ford.
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Old 02-11-2020, 11:11 AM   #9
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Default Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

Marts got it.
Archive what you know on video
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Old 02-11-2020, 11:41 AM   #10
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Default Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Terranova View Post
Marts got it.
Archive what you know on video
The problem with YouTube videos is that YouTube is like the Wild West-anything goes! I cringe when I see these ham fisted metal butchers abuse old iron in their ignorance. And then they go on to spout totally false historical information and inaccurate technical data! Wrong information is as bad as or worse than no information! How is a beginner going to sort the good from the bad? The bad seems to dominate!
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Old 02-11-2020, 12:56 PM   #11
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Default Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

Taking it above a hobbiest level is a daunting challenge. Most guys can tinker in their shop at home and maybe make a few bux while at it but very few realize the challenges to make it a legit business. Hats off to those that somehow make a go of it.
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Old 02-11-2020, 07:05 PM   #12
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Default Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

Quote:
Originally Posted by 40 Deluxe View Post
The problem with YouTube videos is that YouTube is like the Wild West-anything goes! I cringe when I see these ham fisted metal butchers abuse old iron in their ignorance. And then they go on to spout totally false historical information and inaccurate technical data! Wrong information is as bad as or worse than no information! How is a beginner going to sort the good from the bad? The bad seems to dominate!
Ah! You've been watching my stuff then..
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Old 02-11-2020, 08:45 PM   #13
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Default Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

I think this is a true concern. I don't think it will go away, but it will be specialized.



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Old 02-12-2020, 02:56 PM   #14
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I am trying to learn Stromberg 97. I am not really trying to make money or start a business, only trying to learn for myself and my friends and to help preserve the hobby. If I can make money down the road that's good, but that is not why I am trying to learn.
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Old 02-12-2020, 04:00 PM   #15
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Default Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

There are several good buggy and wagon rebuilders and parts suppliers out there for a market of maybe a hundred thousand horse drawn wagons and buggies in service. Some peoples just love to do work or hobbies that keep the past alive. Because they are still a viable means of transportation, I think our old Ford hobby will support a robust field of vendors and rebuilders until the Green New Deal crowd gets enough power to ban gasoline altogether. I am guessing about a hundred years, when we get fusion power down to the size of a bread box.
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Old 02-12-2020, 04:04 PM   #16
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Default Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac VP View Post
I’ve also thought about this question because of the general aging of some of the guys who are experts in various fields of early Ford restoration work. Guys like Dick Spadaro are gone and those still here on this earth are not immortal. My trusty assistant, Will Kimble, could take over doing early Ford 3 speed transmission rebuilding after I hang it up, but he’s pretty clear about not doing the overdrive transmissions. I’m in my later sixties and enjoy doing the overdrives but I don’t plan on doing these for 20 more years.

I’ve thought about offering to do a weekend training session for prospective transmission rebuilding guys but not a localized thing.....something that might involve a small but seriously interested group from around the country. Sort of a “spread the knowledge around” kind of thing so that our expertise won’t just sit in the Ohio area.

This may be just a pipe dream on my part but I’ve kept thinking about it. We hear from customers all over the country that they can’t find anyone in their area to work on their old Ford transmission, especially the overdrive transmissions.

I believe a similar problem is looming in other types of repair.....carburetor repair, distributor rebuilding, rear end work, and other specialties. The guys who have learned all the particulars of these things have, like us, made the mistakes of learning from scratch and became very good at what they now do. Will that knowledge be lost as we age and retire or pass on?
Mac. I think your idea of a weekend training session on rebuilding transmissions, or anything else you would want to share, would be great. If you decide to do so, I would like to be there. You've got my email, phone # in your files. Let me know when.

Alan Purvis, Cleveland, TN
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Old 02-12-2020, 06:53 PM   #17
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Count me in also Mac if you decide to take on the task of passing on your expertise, after all Knowledge is power and I have an unquenchable thirst for any thing old ford especially, I found we may know a lot about some things but when taught by a pro sometimes we don't really know as much as we thought we knew or may have forgotten some of the most important things .
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Old 02-12-2020, 08:57 PM   #18
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Default Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

I for one have and will continue to guide any one young or old who has the passion to learn on how to do things related to our old Fords. While the younger generation may not be overflowing with people interested in old Fords theres still a good amount who are so all will not be lost. For some time now I have been teaching my son on how things are done related to this old Ford stuff so i know for certain what i know will be passed on and Im sure he will do the same in the future.Trust me all will not be lost with the passing of time.
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Old 02-13-2020, 01:25 AM   #19
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Default Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

All these guys listed above and so many more .... Who's gonna fill their shoes? This is taking place in SO many parts of our lives. I'm really sorry this isn't about fords but I have a heart for music and ww2 vets and all survivors of the great depression and this could be about aging folks in any walk of life. Who's gonna fill their shoes? Certainly not an IPhone 11.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxHjRqnY7zA
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Old 02-13-2020, 01:34 PM   #20
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Lightbulb Re: Looking for a new job-maybe...

Quote:
Originally Posted by 40 Deluxe View Post
The problem with YouTube videos is that YouTube is like the Wild West-anything goes! I cringe when I see these ham fisted metal butchers abuse old iron in their ignorance. And then they go on to spout totally false historical information and inaccurate technical data! Wrong information is as bad as or worse than no information! How is a beginner going to sort the good from the bad? The bad seems to dominate!
you are absolutely right although there are exceptions.sorting the wheat from the chaff can be a huge problem
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