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Old 10-15-2019, 12:52 PM   #1
37 Coupe
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Default Gemmer or Ford two tooth steering box?

I thought I heard or read somewhere that there were two manufacturers of Ford two tooth steering boxes and the way to i.d them was obvious Gemmer on one and a big "F" on the Ford manufactured ones. Well I have two and one is marked with the "F" no big deal but the other one is cast Gemmer and on the back the big "F" and on the inside a script F. No big deal I just thought it was interesting as I know Ford either copied or bought out the Gemmer dsign,mayby this one was intermediate.
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Old 10-15-2019, 02:12 PM   #2
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Default Re: Gemmer or Ford two tooth steering box?

The Judging Standards indicated 5 different two-tooth steering boxes.

The three styles marked Gemmer go to June 1930 and incorporate the "straight roller" design which was outmoded by those later. Gemmers show a large raised "F" on the engine side. Your "Gemmer-Patented" is from April '29 through Mid-1930.

Beginning with the new Models Ford started a box with NO identification except for A-3550-C on the engine side. And another box with same A-3550-C but with a raised 5/16 or 9/16 "F" on the outer side. These generally have "tapered" rollers and are easier to repair. Both went from Jan 1930 to end.

A script "F" on the inside is not mentioned.

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Old 10-15-2019, 03:51 PM   #3
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Default Re: Gemmer or Ford two tooth steering box?

My car is a 1931 but a lot of the chassis and frame is a 1930,I think someone in the fifties used my '31 roadster body on a low mileage 1930 chassis. The reason I think this is a lot of the components including the engine do not have much wear. The steering box is the Gemmer one and the original sector gear and bushings are not worn at all,the worm gear still has a copper coating on it if that is the original one,bearings look good but I did not know that about straight and tapered. The correct one I have that has the F on it and numbers you listed would be the one to use but it looks to have been "upgraded" with needle bearings and sector gear may be a replacement as teeth thickness are much less than my low mileage earlier one,probably use the end plate with tube replacement on it on my earlier one. Doubt I will wear out either one I go with.
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Old 10-15-2019, 07:46 PM   #4
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Default Re: Gemmer or Ford two tooth steering box?

The original "Gemmer" boxes had the straight rollers on conical seats. Today to rebuild one of these fully requires using the now available later A-3550-C parts including replacement of the worm, likely the sector, and lower bearing and cup, and upper bearing and extended cup (the steering column clamps onto the extension.)

I have an original bearing style Gemmer box in my avatar pickup which took gleaning the parts from TWO Gemmer boxes to bring together something that works.

It is possible to use a lathe and turn the A-3550-C bearing angle onto the Gemmer upper bearing cup/extension. This part is not hardened. This is a pricey bearing cup and doing this saves a bit of money.

Many have done replacement of the sector shaft bearings with needle bearings. Unfortunately the shafts don't appear to be hardened and the bearing is relative "stationary" compared to usual needle bearing application. Consequently the needles "imprint" the shaft which yield to "cogging" of the steering feel. So be aware of that possibility.

Most today simply replace the sector shaft bushings and hone them to fit on a new shaft. Probably the best way.

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