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Old 04-08-2018, 09:59 AM   #1
woofa.express
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Default tell a Model A related story

My computerskill is ordinary and I don’t know how to add to the thread of ‘ Tell a Model A related story’. So here is a new thread on my A story.
I grew up inNew Zealand and left school in 1965. I always looked up to the bigger boys who had left school quite a bit earlier and who drove Model A’s which was the obsolete family car.
In 1967 Imoved to Australia in search of a pilot job and became an agricultural pilot,commonly called a cropduster. ( I retire this year after 50 years ofcropdusting).
One day in1973 I went to spread fertilizer on pasture for a farmer in the New England region of New South Wales. The farmer arrived to give me instructions. He was driving an A. A tourer (phaeton) cut down to a Ute (pickup). I crawled over it,asked many questions and was probably a nuisance. The farmer’s son arrived,also in an A. Then another, again in an A. Well how many do you have? Eleven was the reply. He went on to explain they bought them at clearing sales for about 10 pound each. (Imperial currency was superseded in 1966 with decimal currency).
He showed me one in a shed and the only restoration it required was a new head liner. I had to ask of course, would he sell me one. No he wouldn’t. But I always liked him for what he did. They all were undercover and thus not deteriorating.
Years passed but my love for the A still remained. Well in 1988 one was advertised locally and its condition was appalling. I made the purchase much to the disgust of my wife along with much verbal abuse. All up it cost me 33K AUD to get restored. I am a poor mechanic and don’t enjoy the work so it was all done by hired professional people. It did represent about twice the market value of the vehicle. But I was both pleased and proud. It has a beautiful engine and performs well.
Today I havethat same car plus 2 others as well as the first Australian all made vehicle, a Holden (G.M.) with 23500 miles on the speedo. (One for each of my kids). They have succeeded in keeping me poor but I love them. My wife has learned to tolerate them and the amount of verbal has reduced.
I use the Ute a lot and I’m happy for all and sundry to take any of them for a drive. I’m not protective with them and if people express concern about damaging them I tell them they were resurrected from a damaged pile of junk and can be again.
My log onname to ‘Ford Barn’ is Woofa express. Woofa is the hound in the picture. He is not allowed in the house or our cars with the exception of the A. Woofa considers the A to be his car.
I am a member of our local vintage car club plus the Victorian Model A Club. It is pleasing to get help from the A club and ‘Ford Barn’. There are so many people who are willing to share their knowledge out there. I take this opportunity to say thankyou to those people.

Last edited by woofa.express; 04-08-2018 at 10:21 AM. Reason: spelling error
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Old 04-08-2018, 10:46 AM   #2
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Hi there, I enjoyed your story. Iíve always thought that cropdusting would be a real hoot, and Iíve never talked with someone who did it as a profession.

I grew up in Oregon in the Pacific northwestern part of the US. There werenít a lot of people in this state back then and we still arenít densely populated. Lots of open land and more than a few cropdusters.

My model A stories start over 60 years ago when I was 13. My first car was a 1931 coupe that I bought for $25. That car didnít have a dent in it, and really didnít need restoration. I took it apart anyway and learned about every nut and bolt in that car. My love of cars really started with that coupe, and Iíll never forget it. That car taught me how to drive in every condition you can think of, and I owe my love of driving to that first coupe.

I consider myself so fortunate that I grew up in a time when model Aís were a dime a dozen. I miss those times when a simple drive could result in finding a model A hidden in a berry patch or sitting in a barn. All those drives were like treasure hunts for me, and man did I find a lot of treasure. My folks allowed me to have one car at a time. So, when one was up and running, Iíd sell it and get another. That love of those old model Aís kept me out of trouble. I donít even want to imagine the trouble I would have gotten into if it hadnít been for those cars.

Give Woofa a pet for me,

Mike
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Old 04-08-2018, 01:09 PM   #3
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Hi there, I enjoyed your story. Iíve always thought that cropdusting would be a real hoot, and Iíve never talked with someone who did it as a profession.

I grew up in Oregon in the Pacific northwestern part of the US. There werenít a lot of people in this state back then and we still arenít densely populated. Lots of open land and more than a few cropdusters.

My model A stories start over 60 years ago when I was 13. My first car was a 1931 coupe that I bought for $25. That car didnít have a dent in it, and really didnít need restoration. I took it apart anyway and learned about every nut and bolt in that car. My love of cars really started with that coupe, and Iíll never forget it. That car taught me how to drive in every condition you can think of, and I owe my love of driving to that first coupe.

I consider myself so fortunate that I grew up in a time when model Aís were a dime a dozen. I miss those times when a simple drive could result in finding a model A hidden in a berry patch or sitting in a barn. All those drives were like treasure hunts for me, and man did I find a lot of treasure. My folks allowed me to have one car at a time. So, when one was up and running, Iíd sell it and get another. That love of those old model Aís kept me out of trouble. I donít even want to imagine the trouble I would have gotten into if it hadnít been for those cars.

Give Woofa a pet for me,

Mike

hi Mike. that's a good story too. you were so lucky to get access to such a large amount of A's.
I've been to Klamath Falls in your state. I had a cropdusting mate at Williams Cal who flew me up there and on to Walla Walla. Sadly prostate took him. He survived 2 Viet Nam tours as helicopter pilot and years of cropdusting to be taken out with health issue.


I was impressed at Klamath because the military were able to operate with airliners, light aircraft and cropdusters. The military here think they are above all others and it is below their dignity to mix with other 'lowly' types. shame.


Thanks for your response, cheers, gary
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Old 04-09-2018, 01:06 PM   #4
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Prostate Cancer is an affection us guys have to worry about. After age 65, 75% will have Prostate Cancer, mine appeared at age 65 right on the money. I had it removed and don't regret it for the most part. After the cancer escapes the Prostate it considered incurable and only treatable. Keep a check on your PSA number Guys.
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Old 04-10-2018, 04:52 AM   #5
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Hello Marvin.
yes, it's a problem for all of us. however it seems good news has arrived on the horizon. the injection of steam kills it all. I'm not a medical man but that's what I read in the newspaper.
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Old 04-19-2018, 03:20 PM   #6
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Keep a check on your PSA number Guys.

yes, males have a prostate. Females don't.
Isn't the modern term quite silly. Including girls as guys?
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Old 06-19-2018, 03:38 AM   #7
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Quote:
Originally Posted by wingski View Post
Hi there, I enjoyed your story. Iíve always thought that cropdusting would be a real hoot, and Iíve never talked with someone who did it as a profession.

I grew up in Oregon in the Pacific northwestern part of the US. There werenít a lot of people in this state back then and we still arenít densely populated. Lots of open land and more than a few cropdusters.

My model A stories start over 60 years ago when I was 13. My first car was a 1931 coupe that I bought for $25. That car didnít have a dent in it, and really didnít need restoration. I took it apart anyway and learned about every nut and bolt in that car. My love of cars really started with that coupe, and Iíll never forget it. That car taught me how to drive in every condition you can think of, and I owe my love of driving to that first coupe.

I consider myself so fortunate that I grew up in a time when model Aís were a dime a dozen. I miss those times when a simple drive could result in finding a model A hidden in a berry patch or sitting in a barn. All those drives were like treasure hunts for me, and man did I find a lot of treasure. My folks allowed me to have one car at a time. So, when one was up and running, Iíd sell it and get another. That love of those old model Aís kept me out of trouble. I donít even want to imagine the trouble I would have gotten into if it hadnít been for those cars.

Give Woofa a pet for me,

Mike

thank you and I did enjoy reading your repose. I will respond in a couple of days. cheers, gay
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Old 06-19-2018, 04:17 AM   #8
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Quote:
Originally Posted by wingski View Post
Hi there, I enjoyed your story. Iíve always thought that cropdusting would be a real hoot, and Iíve never talked with someone who did it as a profession.

I grew up in Oregon in the Pacific northwestern part of the US. There werenít a lot of people in this state back then and we still arenít densely populated. Lots of open land and more than a few cropdusters.

My model A stories start over 60 years ago when I was 13. My first car was a 1931 coupe that I bought for $25. That car didnít have a dent in it, and really didnít need restoration. I took it apart anyway and learned about every nut and bolt in that car. My love of cars really started with that coupe, and Iíll never forget it. That car taught me how to drive in every condition you can think of, and I owe my love of driving to that first coupe.

I consider myself so fortunate that I grew up in a time when model Aís were a dime a dozen. I miss those times when a simple drive could result in finding a model A hidden in a berry patch or sitting in a barn. All those drives were like treasure hunts for me, and man did I find a lot of treasure. My folks allowed me to have one car at a time. So, when one was up and running, Iíd sell it and get another. That love of those old model Aís kept me out of trouble. I donít even want to imagine the trouble I would have gotten into if it hadnít been for those cars.

Give Woofa a pet for me,

Mike


Hi Mike, did you read my story about the farmer and his sons who bought the A's from farmers clearing sales? if you didn't email me and I will forward it to you. thankyou for responding to my story. yes it does please me and thankyou. gary
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Old 04-08-2018, 02:42 PM   #9
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

I was parked at a casino and a very, very old, and very grayed haired lady came by and started looking at my car, she started to tear up, told me it brought back many fond memories, she thanked me and left.
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Old 04-09-2018, 03:01 AM   #10
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I was parked at a casino and a very, very old, and very grayed haired lady came by and started looking at my car, she started to tear up, told me it brought back many fond memories, she thanked me and left.
Very similar story, while travelling through Central Australia returning home from the National Model A Meet we had stopped at a trailer park where we had spent two nights. I was taking the opportunity to service the car when I was approached by an older gentleman who showed much interest in the car, he asked all the usual questions and was a very interesting man to talk to. As I had time to spare i asked him if he would like to go for a drive. He readily accepted my offer.
He chatted as we drove down the road but suddenly I detected a change in his voice as he stopped talking. I looked across at him and he had tears streaming down his face. Somewhat embarressed he explained. I had just taken him back to when he was a 13 year old child sitting beside his dad in their Model A on the way to school.
Never under estimate the memories that our cars evoke.
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Old 04-08-2018, 03:34 PM   #11
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Hey WOOFA.EXPRESS, I enjoyed your Model A story. Here is a rather long story about my first Model A. This was published in one of the Model A Magazines a few years ago and I updated it again a couple years ago. Now I have to get it running again so my Grandson and I can drive it 1800 miles to it's new home when he turns 16 in 2019. Really looking forward to that. Enjoy the read and maybe I'll send you another about my original 1931 Station Wagon with wood wheels. Dick Knapp


On the road again after 45 year rest... by Dick Knapp
This is my 1929 Business Coupe that I drove to High School in 1955. It was my Grandpa's only transportation for
many years and I remember riding home in this car to spend the weekend with he and Grandma. My Grandpa bought this car from Ward Winchester in Clintonville, Wisconsin sometime in the late 40's. I got the car in 1954. When sanding the doors to prepare for a new paint job I found a logo on the doors for The Commonwealth Telephone Company. Perhaps that was the telephone company in Clintonville in the late 30's. I kinda restored it ( I think you know what I mean) in 1964. I changed it to a Sport Coupe with a rumble seat. Then it was parked while we raised a family and moved around the country with the US Air Force. About 2008 I got serious about giving this car a good restoration and I decided that it had to go back to a Business Coupe.
Many old cars nuts have an interesting story and I hope that you enjoy this story about me and my 1929 Model A Business Coupe. It starts in the early 1950's. I grew up in a little town called Clintonville, not too far from Iola, Wisconsin. My car experiences started early when my Mom decided I needed something to do to keep me out of trouble over summer school vacations. She took me to the local JCís sign-up for the Soap Box Derby program as soon as I was eligible at age 10. After winning third place that first year I was hooked and went on to compete every year until I was fifteen. I won some races and always finished near the top, but never won the Green Bay regional event for the trip to Akron.
Actually, my experience as a developing gear head and old car nut started even earlier. My Dad had left our family when I was about eight or nine and both of my Grandpasís spent extra time with me, their oldest Grandson. My Grandpa in Clintonville had a full time wrecking business. He lived just across the street and had a small wrecking yard right behind our house. What a great place for a kid to play! My other Grandpa had a part time wrecking business in Bear Creek, so it is no wonder that I was developing a love for old cars.
When Grandpa got a call to pick up an old car, he would call me to go along in the wrecker. Iola,, Big Falls, Symco and Marion were places I remember going to often to haul a Model T, Model A or old Studebaker out of the weeds. If the car didnít have tires, the front end was winched up on to the back of the wrecker. Then the cable was run over the top to the back bumper. The car could be winched up off the ground, but of course the top was crushed with a big crease from the cable. When we would get back from these trips my Grandpa usually gave me a quarter with the advice that I should put it in the bank because I could get three percent interest on it.
Grandpa was anxious for me to learn how to drive that wrecker so I could be more help to him. My legs were not long enough to reach the pedals, so I would sit on his lap and steer while he worked the pedals and his big hand covered mine as he guided me through the gears on that four-speed. I eventually could reach the pedals by sitting on the front edge of the seat. That led to driving the wrecker around the bone yard helping move motors and cars here and there. The wrecker had a winch that was PTO driven. A lever in the floor engaged the winch. The transmission had to be in neutral and you had to let the clutch out to work the winch. I remember one incident very well with this winch. Grandpa unhooked the motor I just hauled and he hooked the loose cable to one of the boom supports. I drove off to pick up another motor not realizing that I had not taken the winch out of gear. The cable was tightening up and pulling the entire boom up and over, coming down soon to crush the cab. Grandpa saw what was happening and stopped me before a real disaster happened. He was not happy and Iím not sure, but I probably did not get my quarter that day.
At fifteen years old I was through racing Soap Box Derby cars, so I went to the local Ford garage to apply for a job. They hired me be to sweep floors, pump gas, wash and grease cars and stock shelves. What I wouldnít give now to go through some of those shelves of new old stock parts. One day someone traded in a 40 Ford convertible with a Columbia overdrive. I really wanted that car. I talked the salesman into letting me take it home to get Mom's approval (and financial support) to buy it. I took my Grandpa from Bear Creek and my Mom for a ride, but they were not too impressed. They didnít think that a 16 year old needed a hot V-8 convertible. So, they came up with a plan. Mom would buy Grandpa a mid 40ís Studebaker and Grandpa would give me his Model A Business coupe. Well, that is what happened and this Model A became my wheels through High School in 1955. It was stored through our early years of marriage and in the mid-60's I restored it as best as I knew how. I put about 1500 miles on it and we decided that a Model A sedan would be better with our three small children. So, this Model A was stored and would not see the road again for 45 years. In 2010, after a two- year restoration, the finished restoration picture was taken on my first test drive. I sent this article and a picture to Old Cars magazine and it made the cover and featured article for that month. This soon became my favorite ride. We took it to my 55th class reunion in Clintonville in September, 2010.
I think my Grandpa would be pleased to know that I plan to continue the tradition and give this car to Preston, my oldest Grandson. He is 14 now and this car will be his if he wants it when he turns sixteen (I am hoping that he does not plan to put a hot V-8 in it). I am also hoping that together we can drive it to California in 2019 and hoping that his Dad will sell some Mustangs to make room for another great car.
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File Type: jpg 29 bus coupe done 001_resized10%.JPG (38.8 KB, 114 views)
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Old 07-30-2018, 02:39 PM   #12
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Quote:
Originally Posted by DKnapp View Post
Hey WOOFA.EXPRESS, I enjoyed your Model A story. Here is a rather long story about my first Model A. This was published in one of the Model A Magazines a few years ago and I updated it again a couple years ago. Now I have to get it running again so my Grandson and I can drive it 1800 miles to it's new home when he turns 16 in 2019. Really looking forward to that. Enjoy the read and maybe I'll send you another about my original 1931 Station Wagon with wood wheels. Dick Knapp


On the road again after 45 year rest... by Dick Knapp
This is my 1929 Business Coupe that I drove to High School in 1955. It was my Grandpa's only transportation for
many years and I remember riding home in this car to spend the weekend with he and Grandma. My Grandpa bought this car from Ward Winchester in Clintonville, Wisconsin sometime in the late 40's. I got the car in 1954. When sanding the doors to prepare for a new paint job I found a logo on the doors for The Commonwealth Telephone Company. Perhaps that was the telephone company in Clintonville in the late 30's. I kinda restored it ( I think you know what I mean) in 1964. I changed it to a Sport Coupe with a rumble seat. Then it was parked while we raised a family and moved around the country with the US Air Force. About 2008 I got serious about giving this car a good restoration and I decided that it had to go back to a Business Coupe.
Many old cars nuts have an interesting story and I hope that you enjoy this story about me and my 1929 Model A Business Coupe. It starts in the early 1950's. I grew up in a little town called Clintonville, not too far from Iola, Wisconsin. My car experiences started early when my Mom decided I needed something to do to keep me out of trouble over summer school vacations. She took me to the local JCís sign-up for the Soap Box Derby program as soon as I was eligible at age 10. After winning third place that first year I was hooked and went on to compete every year until I was fifteen. I won some races and always finished near the top, but never won the Green Bay regional event for the trip to Akron.
Actually, my experience as a developing gear head and old car nut started even earlier. My Dad had left our family when I was about eight or nine and both of my Grandpasís spent extra time with me, their oldest Grandson. My Grandpa in Clintonville had a full time wrecking business. He lived just across the street and had a small wrecking yard right behind our house. What a great place for a kid to play! My other Grandpa had a part time wrecking business in Bear Creek, so it is no wonder that I was developing a love for old cars.
When Grandpa got a call to pick up an old car, he would call me to go along in the wrecker. Iola,, Big Falls, Symco and Marion were places I remember going to often to haul a Model T, Model A or old Studebaker out of the weeds. If the car didnít have tires, the front end was winched up on to the back of the wrecker. Then the cable was run over the top to the back bumper. The car could be winched up off the ground, but of course the top was crushed with a big crease from the cable. When we would get back from these trips my Grandpa usually gave me a quarter with the advice that I should put it in the bank because I could get three percent interest on it.
Grandpa was anxious for me to learn how to drive that wrecker so I could be more help to him. My legs were not long enough to reach the pedals, so I would sit on his lap and steer while he worked the pedals and his big hand covered mine as he guided me through the gears on that four-speed. I eventually could reach the pedals by sitting on the front edge of the seat. That led to driving the wrecker around the bone yard helping move motors and cars here and there. The wrecker had a winch that was PTO driven. A lever in the floor engaged the winch. The transmission had to be in neutral and you had to let the clutch out to work the winch. I remember one incident very well with this winch. Grandpa unhooked the motor I just hauled and he hooked the loose cable to one of the boom supports. I drove off to pick up another motor not realizing that I had not taken the winch out of gear. The cable was tightening up and pulling the entire boom up and over, coming down soon to crush the cab. Grandpa saw what was happening and stopped me before a real disaster happened. He was not happy and Iím not sure, but I probably did not get my quarter that day.
At fifteen years old I was through racing Soap Box Derby cars, so I went to the local Ford garage to apply for a job. They hired me be to sweep floors, pump gas, wash and grease cars and stock shelves. What I wouldnít give now to go through some of those shelves of new old stock parts. One day someone traded in a 40 Ford convertible with a Columbia overdrive. I really wanted that car. I talked the salesman into letting me take it home to get Mom's approval (and financial support) to buy it. I took my Grandpa from Bear Creek and my Mom for a ride, but they were not too impressed. They didnít think that a 16 year old needed a hot V-8 convertible. So, they came up with a plan. Mom would buy Grandpa a mid 40ís Studebaker and Grandpa would give me his Model A Business coupe. Well, that is what happened and this Model A became my wheels through High School in 1955. It was stored through our early years of marriage and in the mid-60's I restored it as best as I knew how. I put about 1500 miles on it and we decided that a Model A sedan would be better with our three small children. So, this Model A was stored and would not see the road again for 45 years. In 2010, after a two- year restoration, the finished restoration picture was taken on my first test drive. I sent this article and a picture to Old Cars magazine and it made the cover and featured article for that month. This soon became my favorite ride. We took it to my 55th class reunion in Clintonville in September, 2010.
I think my Grandpa would be pleased to know that I plan to continue the tradition and give this car to Preston, my oldest Grandson. He is 14 now and this car will be his if he wants it when he turns sixteen (I am hoping that he does not plan to put a hot V-8 in it). I am also hoping that together we can drive it to California in 2019 and hoping that his Dad will sell some Mustangs to make room for another great car.

It's been nearly 4 months since this article was written. I've gone back and re read it. What a wonderful upbringing Mr Knapp had. What a great article Mr Knapp.
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Old 07-30-2018, 03:17 PM   #13
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Engine Failures in Agcat aeroplane.


I had a cat that had gone down several times.Once with Hugh McIntosh who had never had a forced landing before. Then he took off again and in 30 sec she quit again. The rest of us who flew it had been down several times before but not poor Hugh.

There is sometimes confusion in the assembly of an ag cat. The fuel tanks cross to a vent line and if these are assembled incorrectly the vent can be wrongly coupled with the opposite vent and thus the fuel tank to the other fuel tank. In other words, no venting. Well after exhaustive testing I was convinced this was not the case.However in desperation I vented the tanks straight out the top. No more trouble. Lost probably 2 gals of gas each time we refuelled but no more problems. Never did figure out what the problem was but since the trouble stopped it didnít really matter any more.

We had another engine that continually quit. Funny thing. It would give about 20 seconds notice by moving in the mount. The time allowed one to position for the inevitable forced landing. Even more odd was after landing one would taxi to the end of the paddock and takeoff to resume ops again.

Well as you might expect we were all a bit nervous about this engine, so we simply changed it.

Good old reliable Eric Noonan reported pinched mag leads. It looks likely that I had changed the mag (and I was good and quickat doing this) and pinched the leads in clamping up the mag covers. Silly thing was if myself or any other pilot experiencing this had done a mag check, one would have found it flew good on just one. One could have resumed then by switching back to both. You know we all did learn this at flying school years before. I spose at ground level we were most interested in having a successful forced landing.
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Old 04-08-2018, 08:45 PM   #14
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Love Model A stories. My 30 Cabby was redone in the 60's in NY someplace. Smokey has carried me many-a mile with new stories every trip.
We were someplace and an elderly couple came up to her. The purple haired lady was looking longingly in the Rumble seat. I've seen that misty look before so I sez "Did you ever fool around in a rumble seat. Her eyes watered as she blurted out "YES, but not with HIM"!! Then my eyes watered...
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Old 09-09-2018, 10:29 AM   #15
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Love Model A stories. My 30 Cabby was redone in the 60's in NY someplace. Smokey has carried me many-a mile with new stories every trip.
We were someplace and an elderly couple came up to her. The purple haired lady was looking longingly in the Rumble seat. I've seen that misty look before so I sez "Did you ever fool around in a rumble seat. Her eyes watered as she blurted out "YES, but not with HIM"!! Then my eyes watered...
A true examble of a "Jalopy"
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Old 09-09-2018, 10:34 AM   #16
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A true examble of a "Jalopy"


Do not know what happened, was meant for post 189.
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Old 09-10-2018, 05:55 AM   #17
woofa.express
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Bill was both Clever and Cunning.

Bill Riley was an astute and enterprising fellow. He had the Australian agency and distribution rights to sell the popular Blanik glider.
Henry gave his Model T customers a choice of colours. There was black in addition to black etc etc. You know the story. Well Blanik did better. There was black and a cacky coloured pinky-red. It was a bit yuk. Black was popular and the cack red-pink coloured one not.
Now Bill had a problem. He had 3 sold. He had 3 cacky and only 2 black. Well Bill fixed that. He let it be widely known that when they were built and flight tested the ones that exceeded designed performance were painted red.
Well, as you might expect each of the customers insisted they had to have a red one. Problem solved.
No flies on Bill. It is said one needs to be out of bed early to beat a yank. I reckon you need to be out of bed even earlier to beat Bill. And such a likeable bloke.



Tomorrow I have a story on Bill and other local blokes here in Tocumwal. All about enterprise and initiative. The Blanik shot is from the internet.
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Old 09-11-2018, 02:19 PM   #18
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Ingenuity, Initiative, Enterprise and Leadership. Recognise these qualities of people in your community.

I was working out of Ingham in far north Queensland spraying sugar cane. This would have been about ’75. A Cessna 182 arrived towing a glider in accompaniment with an engine powered glider that had departed Tocumwal, some 1500 nautical miles to the south. Pilots Peter Menhennett in the Cessna, Bill Riley in the glider and Bert Persons in the powered glider. Little did I realise I too would end up living and working at Tocumwal in ’78 as an itinerant and being here ever since. The first Christmas eve I asked Peter, the bloke mentioned above, if he could fly me to Tullamarine airport (Melbourne airport). Peter said no not really, but he could run me to Essendon airport which was close by and I could take a cab. Why, what be the difference I asked. Well Peter explained he was familiar with procedures of arrival and departure out of Essendon but not Tullamarine. If he messed up at Tulla and an incident report would be created and the aviation authority, CASA, would find out he had no flying licence. It wasn’t worth the risk. Eventually Peter did get a pilot licence. He flew all my planes but didn’t do ag work in them of course. Not that I know of anyway.

My two sons Dennis and Michael’s first job was working at the Tocumwal gliding school with Peter and Bill Riley doing menial tasks and by saving their wages took lessons in flying gliders. Des Russell, Peter’s father in law, was their instructor. The next year I taught them to fly aeroplanes and they towed gliders under the supervision of Peter.They enjoyed working there and were well supervised by all the above mentioned people who provided not only supervision but leadership as well.
. Footnote.
Peter’s father in law was Des Russell. The gliding instructor and otherwise builder. He and Peter built my house near Tocumwal.
Eldest son Dennis accrued some 700 hours towing and second son Michael some 900 hours. Both have progressed on to fly airliners. . They both got their start from Peter, Des and Bill Riley. In the morning Dennis flies Sydney- Auckland- Brisbane and Michael does Hong Kong-New York.
Des had an aneurism and died near Tamworth, I returned him to Tocumwal. That was his last flight and landing at Tocumwal. Now that was sad. Bill too has passed. Sadly I don’t believe they got the recognition from the community that was deserved. And Peter, he remains our family friend and the boy wonder. You have to admire his courage and initiative don’t you.
Extra footnote.
One day Peter’s wife, Maryanne was flying to Darwin on the airliner and Dennis, just be chance was captain. Her seat was upgraded and she later told Peter that never again was she flying economy.
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Old 04-09-2018, 11:46 AM   #19
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Love the stories.............keep them coming
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Old 04-10-2018, 04:53 AM   #20
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there's 2 more there now Ben
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