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Old 07-14-2020, 11:00 PM   #21
DavidG
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Default Re: 1932 "survivoration"

woodiewagon46,

With respect, I recommend that you take a closer look at the next original or correctly restored '32 station wagon that you encounter. The side roof rails have a double compound curve from the B pillar forward (down and in) in addition to having a cove inside running their entire length to accommodate the side curtains that slide up under the roof. Not likely that even the best cabinet maker/carpenter could make them using only a table saw, even the very best table saw. It is error to state that "there are no complex curves to deal with".
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Old 07-14-2020, 11:43 PM   #22
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Default Re: 1932 "survivoration"

all the auto makers had some real wood guys back in those days. the finger joints and nice fits are mind boggling on some cars
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Old 07-15-2020, 04:14 AM   #23
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Default Re: 1932 "survivoration"

Sounds like a Good plan
I made a survivoration on my 33 Roadster.
http://brandow.eu/
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Old 07-15-2020, 04:37 AM   #24
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Default Re: 1932 "survivoration"

It really boils down to how much time is on your clock still. And do you want to see it under your feet? We all like the hunt and challenge. It is hard tracking down parts for the "average" restoration. I know how hard the parts are to find and have owned 6 of these 32 wagons including 1 V8 car. The wood parts in finding usable originals will be the most challenging. God bless you in your quest.
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Old 07-15-2020, 04:47 AM   #25
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Ro...Maybe you remember the song, "Garden Party?" n' see, it's all right now, I learned my lesson well. You see ya can't please everyone, so you got to please yourself."
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Old 07-15-2020, 07:26 AM   #26
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Old 07-15-2020, 08:35 AM   #27
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Default Re: 1932 "survivoration"

David, the roof rail you are talking about is common to most Station Wagons, built in the early '30s, not only Ford's. I have seen and read about it fabricated several different ways, such as two piece's morticed together, two pieces joined with woodworking "biscuits" and even a flat piece of steel bent and hidden in the glue joint. In the May 2020 issue of the Woodie Times an article about a 1930 Franklin discuses the exact part.
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Old 07-15-2020, 08:46 AM   #28
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Default Re: 1932 "survivoration"

"ro" - As many others have said; it's your car, do it your way. In addition, I believe you deserve extra credit for coming up with the term "survivoration".
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Old 07-15-2020, 09:16 AM   #29
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I'm working frantically to trademark that term ��
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Old 07-15-2020, 11:25 AM   #30
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Default Re: 1932 "survivoration"

ro - great project and I really like your openness to ideas. As said, it is your car. If you want to be able to drive the car sooner rather than later, there may be a hybrid approach. Find all of the original parts that you can now and augment with anything needed to get her moving under her own power. Then, over time as you find original parts, you can replace the aftermarket ones with original ones. I realize it is easier to replace some parts than others though, but this would get her rolling.
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Old 07-15-2020, 12:08 PM   #31
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Default Re: 1932 "survivoration"

I continue to appreciate the thoughts being shared. It is a very rare car, so I totally get the notion of making it as nice as possible to honor that. I also subscribe to the idea that there is honor in preserving all of the original elements as possible. I'm excited about this survivoration because I think I'll be able to find a sweet spot in the middle. The paint job in the photo will likely be "improved" to show a little less wear. This was mainly my attempt to see what I could do with creating an aged look. As I mentioned, the project is centered around the original doors. Once they are on the car, I will work to make sure the paint work feels right. The doors are nice, so the final product will be sharp looking, but not brand new. I am also paying keen attention to using the proper wood types, screw types, etc. It will be as accurate as the finest restoration.

And, don't forget to send anyone who might have old parts in my direction! :-)

Thanks again,
rod
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Old 07-15-2020, 12:09 PM   #32
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Default Re: 1932 "survivoration"

Quote:
Originally Posted by ro View Post
I'm working frantically to trademark that term ��
Too late!

Survivoration

Just kidding
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Old 07-15-2020, 12:20 PM   #33
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Quote:
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Too late!

Survivoration

Just kidding
Dang! I should have thought of doing it that way :-)
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Old 07-15-2020, 12:38 PM   #34
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Default Re: 1932 "survivoration"

I also applaud your effort!...yes, it is a very valuable car but, it ain’t just about the money. I honestly believe you will enjoy it more by not investing tens of thousands of dollars and worrying every time somebody walks up to it or leaving it home in the garage because something may happen to it. Consider a build thread and add pics and text when you complete another segment. I know a build thread is a lot of time and effort but I think many would be interested.
GBSISSON built his own “Woodie” using a half-ton pickup. Check out his thread on the build.......Good Luck!!!.......Mark
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Old 07-15-2020, 06:13 PM   #35
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Default Re: 1932 "survivoration"

DD and Robert,


Station wagon bodies were numbered as 'ro' states so it is presumably the eleventh station wagon body built. It would be something of a coincidence if it were the eleventh station wagon produced as that presumes that all '32 station wagons were assembled at a single assembly plant and that plant ruthlessly employed FIFO inventory control. Neither of those presumptions are accurate based on Ford's archival records. The body may be from the eighth or eighteen or eightieth whole station wagon built depending on where that station wagon was assembled and how far away that assembly plant was located compared to the location of where the body was built (there were two sources of the '32 station wagon bodies as Baker-Rauling only made some of them). There are no surviving records of when either numbered bodies or specific engine number engine/transmission assemblies were assembled together into a vehicle, station wagon or otherwise. A more accurate claim would be; "it's an '32 early station wagon and its body was the eleventh one built by Baker-Rauling", assuming it is a Baker-Rauling body. Presumably it has the early version of the header bow and no tool box in the floor in front of the tailgate like the later '32 station wagon bodies.


Some, but perhaps not even a majority of Ford-built '32 passenger car bodies (standard coupes and sedans most notably) had a body number stamped on the #1 steel cross sill usually with a letter prefix (D for Dearborn, T for Twin Cities, etc.) denoting the plant where the body was built. The cabriolets, convertible sedans, deluxe coupes, and some, but not all, Fordor sedans had separate numbered body builder tags riveted to that #1 cross sill.
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Old 07-15-2020, 07:45 PM   #36
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Default Re: 1932 "survivoration"

I love the premise of this '32 build. I rage up and down my gravel road in my home-built woodie wagon. Since the weather got good here in Western Washington mine has been parked in my sunny field getting a little more amber in her brushed on spar varnish. The body's framing is maple, panels birch ply and the roof slats hemlock. The double compound curve longitudinal roof stringers are laminated from 5 lifts of western sugar pine. I have hauled garbage cans to the dump and outboard motors and even a V8 block in the back. All 4 grandkids are visiting the island this week and they always have to go in Grandpa's wooden car. It doesn't get any better. If I ever get caught up with the work in my day job, I could make you some parts that look old. It's what I do for a living. Keep it up!
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Old 07-15-2020, 08:38 PM   #37
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Default Re: 1932 "survivoration"

"grampa's wooden car" great story GB
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Old 07-15-2020, 09:39 PM   #38
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Default Re: 1932 "survivoration"

We all decided to call it that after one of the girls went to school and told the teacher that grandpa showed us his woodie......
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Old 07-16-2020, 06:56 AM   #39
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Default Re: 1932 "survivoration"

Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidG View Post
woodiewagon46,

With respect, I recommend that you take a closer look at the next original or correctly restored '32 station wagon that you encounter. The side roof rails have a double compound curve from the B pillar forward (down and in) in addition to having a cove inside running their entire length to accommodate the side curtains that slide up under the roof. Not likely that even the best cabinet maker/carpenter could make them using only a table saw, even the very best table saw. It is error to state that "there are no complex curves to deal with".
TRUE the side rails have a little shape.. I dont use a table saw.. but I did make these for my 36 (which are very similar in design to the 32)

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Old 07-16-2020, 06:59 AM   #40
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BTW Ro.. I havent forgotten about our phone call.. I did find some pieces that may be of interest.. unfortunately (or fortunately for me) ANOTHER wagon has come into my life.. and I have been somewhat distracted by it..
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