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Old 06-18-2018, 10:43 PM   #101
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

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Originally Posted by woofa.express View Post
Hi Deluxe 40.
No, I don't mind if you point out any error or errors I make. Do however look at my signature at the bottom of my writings. No, I don't know everything.
It's been some time since I saw the Ford tractor in question. At the time the differences I noted was the throttle and the grill. the Au fergie has horizontal fins and the Ford has vertical. There no doubt there are other factors I didn't spot. I looked up on the internet and the 9N is just the same as the TE20 with the exception of a few minor things. yes it was the hydraulic system that was the centre of the litigation. and Perhaps the front axil forks??
you can contradict me, it does not offend me and I can learn from it. cheers, gary
The hydraulic systems were nearly identical, with some parts even being interchangeable, as I remember.
The major obvious difference was the engine. The Fergie was overhead valve while the N series Fords were flathead, being basically half of the 239 V8; pistons, valves, lifters and timing gears being the same. Both the Fergie and Ford grille designs were also used here in the States. When I was a kid on the farm the 9, 2, and 8N fords were everywhere, and TE and TO Fergies were common. Dad bought a 1947 TE20 when I was about 10. Put a lot of hours on the seat of that tractor.
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Old 06-19-2018, 03:38 AM   #102
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

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Hi there, I enjoyed your story. Iíve always thought that cropdusting would be a real hoot, and Iíve never talked with someone who did it as a profession.

I grew up in Oregon in the Pacific northwestern part of the US. There werenít a lot of people in this state back then and we still arenít densely populated. Lots of open land and more than a few cropdusters.

My model A stories start over 60 years ago when I was 13. My first car was a 1931 coupe that I bought for $25. That car didnít have a dent in it, and really didnít need restoration. I took it apart anyway and learned about every nut and bolt in that car. My love of cars really started with that coupe, and Iíll never forget it. That car taught me how to drive in every condition you can think of, and I owe my love of driving to that first coupe.

I consider myself so fortunate that I grew up in a time when model Aís were a dime a dozen. I miss those times when a simple drive could result in finding a model A hidden in a berry patch or sitting in a barn. All those drives were like treasure hunts for me, and man did I find a lot of treasure. My folks allowed me to have one car at a time. So, when one was up and running, Iíd sell it and get another. That love of those old model Aís kept me out of trouble. I donít even want to imagine the trouble I would have gotten into if it hadnít been for those cars.

Give Woofa a pet for me,

Mike

thank you and I did enjoy reading your repose. I will respond in a couple of days. cheers, gay
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Old 06-19-2018, 04:17 AM   #103
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

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Hi there, I enjoyed your story. Iíve always thought that cropdusting would be a real hoot, and Iíve never talked with someone who did it as a profession.

I grew up in Oregon in the Pacific northwestern part of the US. There werenít a lot of people in this state back then and we still arenít densely populated. Lots of open land and more than a few cropdusters.

My model A stories start over 60 years ago when I was 13. My first car was a 1931 coupe that I bought for $25. That car didnít have a dent in it, and really didnít need restoration. I took it apart anyway and learned about every nut and bolt in that car. My love of cars really started with that coupe, and Iíll never forget it. That car taught me how to drive in every condition you can think of, and I owe my love of driving to that first coupe.

I consider myself so fortunate that I grew up in a time when model Aís were a dime a dozen. I miss those times when a simple drive could result in finding a model A hidden in a berry patch or sitting in a barn. All those drives were like treasure hunts for me, and man did I find a lot of treasure. My folks allowed me to have one car at a time. So, when one was up and running, Iíd sell it and get another. That love of those old model Aís kept me out of trouble. I donít even want to imagine the trouble I would have gotten into if it hadnít been for those cars.

Give Woofa a pet for me,

Mike


Hi Mike, did you read my story about the farmer and his sons who bought the A's from farmers clearing sales? if you didn't email me and I will forward it to you. thankyou for responding to my story. yes it does please me and thankyou. gary
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Old 06-19-2018, 06:23 PM   #104
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

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The hydraulic systems were nearly identical, with some parts even being interchangeable, as I remember.
The major obvious difference was the engine. The Fergie was overhead valve while the N series Fords were flathead, being basically half of the 239 V8; pistons, valves, lifters and timing gears being the same. Both the Fergie and Ford grille designs were also used here in the States. When I was a kid on the farm the 9, 2, and 8N fords were everywhere, and TE and TO Fergies were common. Dad bought a 1947 TE20 when I was about 10. Put a lot of hours on the seat of that tractor.



When I was a kid we had Farmall A's and a TD6 and a W4. I have only now realised the correct name was a Farmall Model A. Well I suppose it's been more than 50 years since I drove one infact seen one. I spent my weekends and school holidays driving them. I was so young I didn't know how my dad could drive faster than I. I didn't know there was such a thing as gears. In fact I couldn't depress the clutch fully as I was too young. I used to steer it while dad fed hay to the stock from the trailer I was pulling.
I am having difficulty in attaching picture of Farmall Model A so I will close this before I fluff it and try again on new page.

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Old 06-19-2018, 06:25 PM   #105
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farmall Model A
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Old 06-19-2018, 06:44 PM   #106
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Scaredy Cats.
Yesterday avo I offered a Model A admirer my ute (woofa express) to take for a drive. She declined as she was frightened she may damage it. This is a common response I get when offering the vehicle to people.
I tell them it was a heap of shit when I first acquired it and if it is damaged it is not a big deal to repair it. I tell these scaredy cats the “A” was the first motorcar many had ever driven as their previous transport was a horse. Now they, the horses, never had breaks or comfy seats.
About two years ago I took it to a Ford Fairlane rally. Not to enter it as obviously it was not eligible. I knew some of the public spectators and asked them which Fairlane they liked best. They gave me their preference and followed by saying he maroon ute parked across the road that they liked best. I offered the “A”for them to drive and they too declined. Both were farmers (my favourite people) and were familiar with machinery.
You may notice I call the pickup a utility or ute for short. Australian produced utes differ from the American pickups insofar as the tray side panel is acontinuous panel starting directly behind the door. Some call it a slab side. Whereas the American pickup has astand alone tub. To my knowledge the first Australian pickup was made by Ford about 15 years ago were the ute was first made in the mid 1950’s by GeneralMotors Holden. This matter is both contradictory and controversial. Please note my signature at the bottom of this writing. Many vehicles are delivered as a cab-chassis and one gets the tray made to their own specs. I have a Toyota Landcruiser with a steel tray and a wooden floor. A steel floor lets drums and other slide around too easily and dogs find it too hot to stand on.
As for the comparison of pickup verses ute. I think the stand alone tub, the pickup, is preferable because if the floor gets rusted out or it gets damaged too much it’s easy to replace.
Young folk like utes. It’s a cult following that is strong particularly around farming areas. The“first car” for many farm kids was the old farm ute.
The town of Deniliquin, about 35 miles to the west of me has an annual “ute muster”. It’s now a national event. The record number of utes topped out at more than 8,000 and had 25,000 plus visitors. If there has been rain they make mud. With or without the mud they do “circle work”. They all camp on site many just bringing their swags which is a rolled up bed.Some years back my ute (woofa express) was entered by local farmer, BernardClancy and won the best ute at the muster.



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Old 06-19-2018, 07:00 PM   #107
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sorry people. I somehow managed to have the same item submitted twice and have deleted it. The forum won't allow deletion so I have printed this explanation in lieu of. gary


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Old 06-20-2018, 06:40 PM   #108
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Getting Bogged at Dulacca.
An extensive pocket of fertile black soil in the south east of Queensland is known as the Darling Downs. It starts at the top of the Great Dividing Range in the east and runs west through to the town of Roma in the west.
When blacksoil becomes wet it is like plasticine. One cannot drive on it. Even with grass cover vehicles including aeroplanes sink. After 3 days after rain I was working off the Dulacca town strip on the Darling Downs. Dulacca is a town of about 20 or 25 people.And back soil. The strip was doughy. It had a hump near the west end and that obscures the vision from the loading site.
I did a silly thing. I taxied to the west end to takeoff to the east. I stopped for some reason, the aeroplane sank a little and she just would not move. This could not be seen by Adrian and the farmer, Big Col McLennan and his helper, Jacko who had arrived. I walked back to the loading site to get somehelp. I had them come to the aeroplane and push. Adrian on the left wing, Big Col on the right. I didn’t give Jacko a job because he was pissed. I cranked and applied full power. Adrian and big Col pushing. Now Jacko felt a bit left out so he went and pushed on the tail plane. The plane rolled, I applied back pressure on the pole, accelerated, and became airborne.
When I returned for the next load Adrian was in stiches. For what had happened when I had applied back pressure on the pole Jacko had his forefinger jammed between the elevator and horizontal stabiliser. He ran behind until his legs would carry him no longer. He fell. His fore finger continued for the ride. The story got around. And got bigger and better. Big Col had run after the aeroplane and had Big Col not caught him, Jacko would have gone splat on the ground just like a water melon dropped from a great height.
Now with blood gushing everywhere it was decided to get him to the Miles hospital. To get there they needed to pass the Dulacca pub and since Jacko had lost so much blood they had better replenish his body fluid. The publicans wife took to panic and bandaged and mothered him. I don’t know what happened after that but some weeks later I was in the Queensland pub at Miles. I saw this bloke with his finger right up his nose. It looked disgusting. Then I preconised him as Jacko. Infact he had no finger at all. It was only the stump of his forefinger at the base of his nose. Yeh, he was having a go at me. I laughed, he laughed. We drank some cold beer together.
The story got around the farming community and Jacko became a bit of a legend. I bet even today he just loves to tell the story on how he lost his finger
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Old 06-21-2018, 09:46 PM   #109
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Robo asked for it.
John Robertson is an excavator contractor in the NSW town of Finley. Always full of life and cheek too. Well one day I was spraying a rice crop for Jim Casey. Spraying for grass commonly known as barnyard grass. The herbicide was Ordram. It stinks. After spraying this odour will come from the water for 5 days. Whilst it stinks it is not toxic as such.

Each time I turned the aeroplane to do a return run I’d get the fingers. John made sure I saw him by jumping like a clown. With John was the farmer and his name is Paul Sexton. Sexo may have thought Robo’s behaviour was funny but he Sexo, wasn’t endeavouring to offend me. Well I needed to get even with Robo so when I finished the paddock I left about 5 gallons in the aeroplane hopper and flew at them. Robo then presented the fingers from both hands. He didn’t know what was coming. At about 30 yards I opened the dump lever (ie jettison) and they both wore it. Well they were quite wet and very smelly. Both jumped into the irrigation channel in an endeavour to clean up. Robo went home, washed his clothes 3 times then burned them.

Now Paul had a new ute. The windows were wound down. Ordram entered the cab in the right hand side and what was still airborne came out the left hand side. Sexo washed the cab out with a hose. At the time of writing that was at least 30 years ago.Sexo says he can still smell it on a warm day.
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Old 06-22-2018, 02:38 PM   #110
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Death, No Worries.
It must have been about 1998 I was returning to Australia from East Malaysia. The first sector to Darwin is an 11 hour flight. I depart at first light and that gets me to Darwin in daylight hours. This is important because thunderstorms are still active in the tropics. The wet season has started in the tropical north of Australia where thunderstorms start building in early avo. Avoidance is important at any time but more so now as we are very heavy with full fuel. Full tanks and a hopper load is 900 US gallons. 2.7 tons of fuel. Remember cropsprayers have only 1 engine.
We have no refrigeration at our hotel and so I go to the market for breakfast and food to carry enroute. Only chicken is available. This is what I buy. You can guess the rest of the story but I will continue anyway.
2 hours into the flight Sulawesi comes into view. About the same time my tummy rumbles. It didn’t take alot longer before I was chucking up. Then I had the runs. Had to shit in the plastic breakfast bag. Then chuck up again and shit again and again etc etc. It goes on and on and it was on the nose. This continued for another 6 or 7 hours. I started to improve about East Timor which gave me only another 2 hours to Darwin.
On arrival Darwin the customs man decided to be thorough and found a couple of dozen bottles of Phillipino rum. Tanduay. The engineer had stashed it into the rear fuselage. Don’t know why one would want Tanduay rum in Australia. Maybe novel value. because it's poor quality.
Feeling abit better now I went to a restaurant and ordered a steak meal. When it was laid in front of me I nearly chucked again and rushed out without eating. By 2 in the morning I hadn’t improved so took a taxi to the hospital. The doctor gave me some pills and said those alone would cure my problem. I asked if he should give me some charcoal and he thought that was a good idea. But no it wasn’t. I didn’t shit for the next 8 days and that was as bad as the food poisoning.
I showered late in the morning and departed about midday. It was my intention to fly into the night but approaching end of day I decided to stay at a pub in a small outback community of Birdsville. That is very outback in the Simpson Desert. Again I showered and changed clothes. I ate just a little, my appetite still hadn’t returned. I departed about 1 in the morning.
On arrival at my destination which was Leeton NSW I was told they could smell me at 100yards. The smell hadn’t left me. I was still feeling poorly. I did improve for about 2 days then the result of the charcoal (explained earlier) made me progressively worse.
Future flights I purchased food from the town and had the hotel keep it cool in their kitchen fridge. Whilst I was ill, very ill, I could not fly the aeroplane straight or level. I didn’t really know or care which way to point the nose for Australia and infact I didn’t really care. And I wouldn't have cared if I died. Now that's all ridgie didge.
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Old 06-23-2018, 07:07 PM   #111
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Ben hoodwinks the Sudanese Aviation Authority.
Years ago one was required to do a “type endorsement” on each type of aeroplane one was to fly. It’s an old hang-up we had from the days of adopting British law. It was at the time of this incident law in Sudan too. This is a story from Sudan.
Anyway I was to fly a Thrush. An ag plane powered with a Pratt and Whitney 600hp radial. Aviation law in Australia was rewritten to be simpler in some aspects and type endorsement was abolished. I didn’t have Thrush written as a specific type but because I had
1 Tail wheeland
2 Constant speed propeller
I was covered. But this did not suit the Sudanese so I had to do a type endorsement. In the interim I was granted a dispensation. The exam paper was sent from England and arrived about a month later. I was to be driven to Khartoum to sit the paper. This was a long and frightening road trip. Right of way is given to the vehicle with the loudest horn and the brightest flashing headlights. Drivers spent considerable time tuning horns.
I completed the written exam and returned to the farming area to work, commonly known as the Gazera. I was called back to Khartoum in about a month and told I didn’t pass. The reason, that was stated I must check carburettor heat at 1800 rpm, not 1700 as I had written. Or visa versa I don’t recall. It’s not dissimilar to asking whether you wear your undies inside in or inside out. Just as relevant.

They, the Sudanese aviation authority had been assigned poms to oversee their aviation department and it was a pom who corrected my error. Well did I give him a mouthful. He would not have been accustomed to a reprimand from a colonial. Insubordinate bloody colonial! I was granted a type endorsement about 10 days prior to the end of my contract.

Well the best part of this story is about Ben Buckley. Ben an Australian pilot from the high country in Victoria. He had flown the Fletcher and it was a specific type written on Ben’s licence from earlier days. (I had a story and picture of aFletcher a few days back). Well the Fletcher has a designated type ID as a FU24. When the aviation man pointed out he didn’t have a Thrush endorsement Ben responded by saying, “in Australia we call a Thrush a FU24”. Total bull of course. “Ah, that is good then Mr Buckley”. Ben therefore did not have to suffer the hassle that I did.Smart thinking Ben.
This is the radial thrush Ben convinced the Sudanese Authorities was an FU24
The Thrust picture didn't stick. I have much difficulty in posting photos here.





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Old 06-23-2018, 10:37 PM   #112
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that is my further attempt to load a photograph. I have tried and tried. I hate complexities with anything and especially computers.
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Old 06-23-2018, 11:05 PM   #113
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the Fu24 and radial Thrush. You can see the difference is conciderable
GOT IT GOT IT
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Old 06-24-2018, 01:55 AM   #114
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I wrote a few days ago about International tractor also making a model A but wasn't competent enough to post a picture. Now posting a picture is a newly found talent so here it is. the International Model A
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Old 06-24-2018, 03:47 PM   #115
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Ford’s Airliner.


Yes Henry made an airliner. Firstly he purchased an aviation manufacturer by the name of Stout in1926 and Mr Stout designed the “Ford Tri Motor”. As the name suggests a 3 engine aeroplane. Ideas were taken (stolen) from the German Junkers which used corrugated skins. The corrugation gave rigidity but was heavier than traditional fabric which is still used today on some new aeroplanes. Then the basic design was taken from the Fokker. I believe this resulted in a law suit. Have I spelt suit correctly?

The aeroplane was produced and sold in 1929 and Ford went on to produce 199 of them. Many of today’s modern airlines commenced with them. It was a military machine to. Now some trivia, KLM was one such airline and KLM stands for Koninklijke Luchtvaart Maatschappij meaning ‘royal airline company. Betcha didn’t know that and I betcha you can’t pronounce the name either.

Today 5 remain and I believe, and stand to be corrected, (see signature at base of this article) the last regular public service they provided was at long island doing a milk run,so to speak. One went to Idaho and was used for crop spraying then went onto forest fire bombing.

Engine power started at 200 hp then 300 and mostly ended with the Pratt and Whitney Radial 985 (cubic inch displacement) which was supercharged and delivered 450 hp. I think that one would find today all remaining aeroplanes were R985’s ( I sat behind these R985’s for years on the Agcat). . A few had the rpm increased to 2700 rpm and delivered 525 hp.

I see on the aviation trading journal “trade a plane” one is offered for 2.85 million.

I reckon many readers will have know the above. Many readers to would know the tune, a once popular duet turned to a hit. Do click onto the link and take a listen even if you know it. It’s great. Ada Jones and Billy Murray

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eFZDB6DqAnA

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Old 06-24-2018, 04:04 PM   #116
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you may perhaps find some of my words run together. sorry.

What happens is I pen the story using the programme "word" then cut and paste. This is where the error occurs. I do edit it however I do miss some too. gary.
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Old 06-25-2018, 06:45 PM   #117
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The Missing Link.
It was said by teachers I would never become a pilot. I was not bright. Well if I can say so I became a leader in aerial agricultural standards. Insurance carriers talk of me in never having a claim outside a total engine failure. Retiring shortly with 30k hours.
Another agpilot by the name of Chris Holden was told the same. He is a successful pilot in NSW with years of good safe experience.
David Link was a farm boy in the agricultural area I serviced. Ridiculed at school and named “the missing link”. When I bought a new (to me) aeroplane David would appear to check it out. He would appear again, shortly after with all the specs of the aeroplane and power plant. He always was interested in aeroplanes.
My son Dennis was in the same school year as David. When school finished and kids are seeking employment 15 of them, Dennis said, had applied to the airforce for a job. I asked who they were. I had not seen a single one on of them on the airfield and not one was accepted to my knowledge.
David goes and gets a job as drilling assistant, a no future job. He saves his money and takes lessons flying helicopters. His successful career takes him to theNorthern Territory mustering cattle. Then various jobs including in Canada. He returns to Australia and takes up an appointment with National Parks. Everything is going well.
The police aviation wing wanted one extra helicopter pilot and had 74 applicants. David got that one job. Today he flys the most interesting jobs in outback and city. Flies around the big buildings at night with night flying goggles. Still a pilot and did not need tobecome a policeman.
I admire David, the farm kid who was ridiculed at school. Like Chris Holden and myself those lampooned can reach high standards and command top jobs. Hats off to you farm boy.

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Old 06-26-2018, 12:08 PM   #118
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The Staff Car.
After making the purchase of my first A I drove it home. It was running very poorly, difficult to drive with front wheel slop. I had paid $2k for this and the farmer who sold it to me thought I was just nuts. He was correct .
When I reached our small town of 2000 I followed a ute (pickup) that had a load of school kids on the tray, all in cricket whites, armed with shin pads and bats and stumps. Everything one uses to play cricket. They were being driven to the sports ground.
Well when they saw me in that car, Jed Clampett’s car couldn’t hold a candle to it, they with outstretched arms gave me the thumbs up. At that very instant, as if it was their signal of command, the car got wheel shimmy. Their outstretched arms and their thumbs up immediately turned to outstretched arms and fore fingers pointing at me, heads held right back and they were roaring with laughter. I think I still had their approval.
Then into our back yard. Didn’t get wife’s approval. Instead got her abuse. What? What will you do with that? We don’t have much money and you’ve just blown a heap ona pile of rusty tin!
Well things remained at a stalemate for quite a while. As I said we had no money. Eventually it was rebuilt and now runs well is nicely painted and named "the staff car". Wife has softened and now enjoys "the staff car".
It was used in my business. For a 3 month period we hire and accommodated an additional 2 pilots for the duration of the rice sowing and spraying season. The first two out in the morning each took a vehicle with a closed cabin and last to leave got the A. because it was cool. However the first to return home in the afternoon or evening took the A because it was warm.

A traditionat the start of every season was to buy new and ridiculous hats. One year Mexican. One particular afternoon we donned these hats and drove 10 miles south to Tocumwal. I well remember, infact would never forget, being overtaken by an expensive Landrover with 3 mature and well dressed ‘Ladies’ on board. As they drew abeam us they all turned and looked left (we drive on the left in Au). At that very instant they broke down with laughter. Difficult to describe the instantaneous and intensity of that very moment but the 3 of us still mention it from time to time. Yes the hats did attract attention. Mainly they were purchased as a new season ritual and perhaps a form of kinship of 3 experienced crop spay pilots.
The three ofus will never forget that very funny incident. I don’t believe the 3 ladies in the Landrover will either.
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Last edited by woofa.express; 06-26-2018 at 12:18 PM.
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Old 06-26-2018, 12:20 PM   #119
woofa.express
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

the "staff car" on first arrival at my home in Finley NSW.
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Old 06-26-2018, 10:40 PM   #120
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Default Re: tell a Model A related story

Quote:
Originally Posted by woofa.express View Post
The Missing Link.
It was said by teachers I would never become a pilot. I was not bright. Well if I can say so I became a leader in aerial agricultural standards. Insurance carriers talk of me in never having a claim outside a total engine failure. Retiring shortly with 30k hours.
Another agpilot by the name of Chris Holden was told the same. He is a successful pilot in NSW with years of good safe experience.
David Link was a farm boy in the agricultural area I serviced. Ridiculed at school and named ďthe missing linkĒ. When I bought a new (to me) aeroplane David would appear to check it out. He would appear again, shortly after with all the specs of the aeroplane and power plant. He always was interested in aeroplanes.
My son Dennis was in the same school year as David. When school finished and kids are seeking employment 15 of them, Dennis said, had applied to the airforce for a job. I asked who they were. I had not seen a single one on of them on the airfield and not one was accepted to my knowledge.
David goes and gets a job as drilling assistant, a no future job. He saves his money and takes lessons flying helicopters. His successful career takes him to theNorthern Territory mustering cattle. Then various jobs including in Canada. He returns to Australia and takes up an appointment with National Parks. Everything is going well.
The police aviation wing wanted one extra helicopter pilot and had 74 applicants. David got that one job. Today he flys the most interesting jobs in outback and city. Flies around the big buildings at night with night flying goggles. Still a pilot and did not need tobecome a policeman.
I admire David, the farm kid who was ridiculed at school. Like Chris Holden and myself those lampooned can reach high standards and command top jobs. Hats off to you farm boy.

Must be something about pilots, I was told by the school councillor to take auto-motives in high school so when I got kicked out, I could get a job changing oil. Instead headed to the local airport, got a job after school pulling airplanes in and out of the hangar. When not tugging aircraft around was washing, polishing and vacuuming them. By the time I finished high school had my commercial pilots license, never looked back. Heard later the councilor was speechless and most of the teachers were cheering me on.
When my aviation career ended I retired with 22,380 hours, flew the older Boeings including B747s and traveled all around the world. Must be something said for being slow and focused he he he.
I could tell stories about what some real sharp class mates ended up doing, suffice to say I am quite happy with my career choice. God Bless you all.
Gerry Allen, Birch Bay Wa
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