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Old 03-20-2012, 11:48 PM   #1
Tacoma Bob
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Default Shop heater

My three year old Cadet "The Hot One" shop heater took a dump. I'am reluctant to buy another. I have a 500 sq ft well insulated attached garage. I did a searced older posts with so-so results.I already have a dedicated 220 circuit. Any thoughts Guys. Thanks TB
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Old 03-21-2012, 12:11 AM   #2
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Default Re: Shop heater

Check out a FB sister site, garagejournal.com

They have several threads on this subject.
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Old 03-21-2012, 01:24 AM   #3
Craig Lewis
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Default Re: Shop heater

I would not recommend an overhead gas radiant heater.
This is what I've been running in my 1200 sq/ft cement shop for a dozen years and it's not a pleasant feeling heat.
Something about a hot head & cold feet, together with $230xx gas bills, just about has me ready to tear it off the ceiling!
Also, dust builds up on top radiant units ...which burns, stinks & makes headaches.
I think my next choice would be a unit heater hanging in one corner. I'd still use gas, but I think the fan directing the heat in a nice big circle would warm everything evenly...and make good use of less heat.
Less heat = less $$ =
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Old 03-21-2012, 03:49 AM   #4
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Default Re: Shop heater

Check out Modine Hot Dawg heaters. I think they make one that is safe to use in flamable atmospheres
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Old 03-21-2012, 07:01 AM   #5
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Default Re: Shop heater

I agree with Craig, my experience with radiant overhead is that the direct line of sight area and tools are hot, and on the shaded side of any vehicle everything is cold.
Anyone thinking of building a new shop should highly consider in-floor, hot water radiant heat, IMO. We incorporated it into our new 1500 sq. ft. shop, and it's fantastic!
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Old 03-21-2012, 07:06 AM   #6
Barry B./ Ma.
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Default Re: Shop heater

I have a Modine Hot Dawg overhead heater that uses propane gas and outside air for combustion. Very efficient,quick heat and not in the way.
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Old 03-21-2012, 07:47 AM   #7
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Default Re: Shop heater

I have a Lennox "Hot Shot" overhead heater that's been going strong for fourteen years now.
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Old 03-21-2012, 09:21 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Barry B./ Ma. View Post
I have a Modine Hot Dawg overhead heater that uses propane gas and outside air for combustion. Very efficient,quick heat and not in the way.
One of the best heaters I've ever used. Simple installation, and good heat. Initial cost is a little high but once it's in running it won't break you. And it heats the whole shop.
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Old 03-21-2012, 09:22 AM   #9
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Default Re: Shop heater

I bought a Mr. Heater Big Maxx 45,000 BTU natural gas garage unit heater for my shop. It is easy to install and works great!

This also the sold under the brand name Modine.


This unit can also be converted to use propane, by installing a $22 kit. You will need a 100 gallon minimum gas tank for running off propane.


My cost was just under $500 and bought it from Northern Tool
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Old 03-21-2012, 09:41 AM   #10
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Default Re: Shop heater

Like JBill, I also have a 45K BTU Lennox "Hot Shot" overhead heater. I have had it for about 10 years with no problems so far. I use a through the wall vent. My shop walls are 2x6 (2x10 ceiling joices) and well insulated. I works great in my detached 24' x 36' shop. I usually keep the shop at about 60 degrees in the winter.
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Old 03-21-2012, 09:56 AM   #11
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Default Re: Shop heater

The installation real550A has is the same as ours using a proper designed boiler (not just a hot water tank) for heat generation. Only other suggestion I would make is to dig down around the building slab about 18" and install insulation slabs against the foundation, backfill, and tamp hard. This prevents the heat in the floor radiating to the outside cold. Super wonderfull on the feet and to lay on. Even heat throughout the whole shop.
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Old 03-21-2012, 03:05 PM   #12
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Default Re: Shop heater

I have a Toyotomi kerosene heater that is thermostatically controlled, and uses outside air for combustion, and is very cheap to run. It is mounted on an outside wall and heats my 15x30 work area nicely. http://warmth4less.com/toyo.html
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Old 03-21-2012, 04:30 PM   #13
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I think a small ductless heat pump would work
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Old 03-21-2012, 04:35 PM   #14
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Default Re: Shop heater

Quote:
Originally Posted by real550A View Post
I agree with Craig, my experience with radiant overhead is that the direct line of sight area and tools are hot, and on the shaded side of any vehicle everything is cold.
Anyone thinking of building a new shop should highly consider in-floor, hot water radiant heat, IMO. We incorporated it into our new 1500 sq. ft. shop, and it's fantastic!
That in-floor heat has me drooling!
You only have to spend a day on a heated floor to truly realize the difference. Nice job.....
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Old 03-21-2012, 04:45 PM   #15
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Default Re: Shop heater

I have a 180,000 BTU Bryant overhead unit, and it works very well, but if I ever rebuild, it'll be underfloor heat.. When you lay on the concrete, it's nice and warm, and there is not fan blowing dust around..


In 500 sq foot, I'd look at the Hot Dawg low clearance heater.. seems like a good unit

- DIB

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Old 03-21-2012, 04:56 PM   #16
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Default Re: Shop heater

Being you have 220 circuit installed, maybe a couple of small Cadet electric heaters would do it. We use them in our beach house and it keeps it nice. They are made in Vancouver WA.
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:55 PM   #17
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Default Re: Shop heater

Bob, If you would work faster and drink really hot coffee you wouldn't need the heater! LOL
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Old 03-21-2012, 06:05 PM   #18
Barry B./ Ma.
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Default Re: Shop heater

Quote:
Originally Posted by garrisonm89@yahoo.com View Post
One of the best heaters I've ever used. Simple installation, and good heat. Initial cost is a little high but once it's in running it won't break you. And it heats the whole shop.
My Modine overhead heater is 6 years old, is 45,000 BTU and heats my 24x30 work area well, warms the place up in a few minutes and required a 50 gallon propane tank.
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Old 03-22-2012, 09:38 AM   #19
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Default Re: Shop heater

The 45K BTU Mr. Heater, Modine, and Lennox "Hot Shot" are all the same heater. They are made by Mr. Heater and are great zero-clearance, ceiling mount furnaces. Very easy to get parts for.

They also make a 75K BTU unit for the larger shops.

Amazon carries all of them at a good price. If one searches the internet, can find it a little cheaper or free freight.

The Carrier, Mitsubishi, etc split system heat pumps are really nice too. Since they do not have an emergency heat mode, one can get by with a 20 or 30 amp breaker and as low as a 60 amp electrical service panel. They cost on the average of $1300 to $1500 for a basic model that will heat/cool a 750 sq. foot shop. Price goes up as the square footage increases.

You can buy them to run off 120VAC, 240VAC, and 203VAC, three phase. I installed two of these at work, very nice.

I like the natural gas furnaces, cheaper and faster heat.
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Old 03-22-2012, 10:30 AM   #20
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Default Re: Shop heater

Not what most of you want to think about as you want quick heat. In our machine-restoration shop we have used a Jotul wood stove for five years raised up on a dry laid brick and stone platform 2' off of the floor.

We do no painting in the shop during the heating season, nor do we have any open gas or solvents. You would want to clear it w/your insurance co and fire Marshall but done correctly with common sense it is just as safe as any other heating system w/a flame....Gas or an oil burner.

It works well for daily use in northern New England and the shop temp varies from 58 in the morning to 65-70 by mid day. We also have heat when the power goes off w/out using a generator, which is often in the country. Not an option for many but we love it and use it for keeping the coffee hot and we also warm up our lunch on it also.
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Old 03-22-2012, 10:34 AM   #21
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Default Re: Shop heater

"I like the natural gas furnaces, cheaper and faster heat. "

I agree that natural gas is good heat, if you're in an urban setting where it is available, and you're heating a building w/an existing slab. No city gas out here in the woods.
As far as cheaper, that's on a case by case basis. We have a 780 gal. wood fired, outside boiler that heats a home and 2 outbuildings. Due to a tornado last July, the fuel
has been decidedly cheaper than any "store bought" fuel available, and will be for the next 30 years.
I also like the "silent mode" of the slab heat. You literally can hear a pin drop in our shop!
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Old 03-22-2012, 10:43 AM   #22
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Default Re: Shop heater

Quote:
Originally Posted by real550A View Post
"I like the natural gas furnaces, cheaper and faster heat. "

I agree that natural gas is good heat, if you're in an urban setting where it is available, and you're heating a building w/an existing slab. No city gas out here in the woods.
As far as cheaper, that's on a case by case basis. We have a 780 gal. wood fired, outside boiler that heats a home and 2 outbuildings. Due to a tornado last July, the fuel
has been decidedly cheaper than any "store bought" fuel available, and will be for the next 30 years.
I also like the "silent mode" of the slab heat. You literally can hear a pin drop in our shop!

Same thing here in our shop, the stove is going right now and I can hear the clock ticking in the background.

We use 4-5 cords of wood to heat a 30'X40' shop with 10' ceilings and keep it very comfortable. We buy our wood at a cost of $700 a year but it would cost us double that or more plus the cost of the electricity and maintenance.

The main reason we do it though is we really like it and also heat our house w/a wood stove.

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Old 03-22-2012, 10:45 AM   #23
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Default Re: Shop heater

[QUOTE=real550A;391169
I also like the "silent mode" of the slab heat. You literally can hear a pin drop in our shop![/QUOTE]
I sure can agree with that. Originally, I was going with in-floor heat but changed my mind when it required being on all the time as it would take too long to come up to a desired temperature. So, instead I have a typical gas furnace so I could duct into a paint room. Too late to realize these are designed to live in a basement. Heating the shop is not a problem though I agree with others that warm feet is an advantage. The irony is I keep it on all the time to 50 degrees (of course I turn it up when working in there). When the blower kicks on, you can't hear music, etc. If you turn it up then it's too loud when the blower shuts off. I suppose there are worse things to deal with............
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Old 03-22-2012, 11:37 AM   #24
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Default Re: Shop heater

t-head, Nice shop...looks cozy!
I keep our 1500 sq. ft. shop 60F all winter. It's nice to drive the Bobcat w/snowblower in
to dry out and grease, after doing the roads. I have to load the boiler once a day, when it's below zero for extended periods, but ususally once every two days the rest of the winter.
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Old 03-22-2012, 11:47 AM   #25
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t-head, Nice shop...looks cozy!
I keep our 1500 sq. ft. shop 60F all winter. It's nice to drive the Bobcat w/snowblower in
to dry out and grease, after doing the roads. I have to load the boiler once a day, when it's below zero for extended periods, but ususally once every two days the rest of the winter.
A stove is quite a bit more work, I keep the dry wood inside in the right hand bay behind the car trailer (see earlier photos), that bay is not heated but I don't have to go outside to get my wood. I fill the stove with wood at 8pm and get it going again with the left over coals again at 8 am...thru the day I add in wood as needed.

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Old 03-22-2012, 12:56 PM   #26
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Default Re: Shop heater

The thought of having a heater with a flame in a garage where gas fumes are present is frightning.
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Old 03-22-2012, 01:48 PM   #27
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Default Re: Shop heater

Cord wood here on the left coast of Ca is around 250/300 a cord for euc or oak, and I use 2 to 3 cord just for the house, I split my own but have a life and don't feel like splitting another 4 to 5 for the shop, although I would like wood heat, I use a 150,000 mr heater diesel heater to knock the chill down.
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Old 03-23-2012, 01:39 AM   #28
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Default Re: Shop heater

My new garage is getting radiant heat in the floor.
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Old 03-23-2012, 02:51 AM   #29
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Default Re: Shop heater

Quote:
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Same thing here in our shop, the stove is going right now and I can hear the clock ticking in the background.

We use 4-5 cords of wood to heat a 30'X40' shop with 10' ceilings and keep it very comfortable. We buy our wood at a cost of $700 a year but it would cost us double that or more plus the cost of the electricity and maintenance.

The main reason we do it though is we really like it and also heat our house w/a wood stove.

The photo shows the back of the shop where the office is. What you cannot see is the platform the stove is raised up on that I mentioned in the earlier post.

The little room behind the stove with the Elm Garage sign on it holds our big noisy 50 year old 5 hp air compressor. It has a thermostat and a fan that starts up when it gets hot in there and keeps it cool. Before we had to shut the compressor off to use the phone or to talk and had to turn off the furnace to be able to hear who ever was on the phone.

The second photo shows some of our machinery on the other side of the back of the room.
WOW....what a cozy tidy looking shop T-head.
Makes me feel guilty about all the junk piled up in mine.
I can almost feel the heat off that woodstove!

A woodstove does provide the best feeling heat in my opinion...and not as dangerous as some might think given some common sense.
(even though common sense maybe ain't so common)

The body shop I worked at through the 90's used a woodstove. It was a heavy barrel on it's side with a steel door.
Our spray booth, paint and solvents were at the far end. We frequently laid fresh primered parts and motorcycle tanks against the stove to bake. Alot of things you don't want to hear about went through that stove and we never had a problem except for the extraordinary amount of time it consumed to keep it stoked while trying to make a day's pay.
Funny thing...I talked with my old partner today and he still runs it in the shop, although he says the latest insurance lookie-lou was somewhat dissenchanted last week and it might have to go....
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Old 03-23-2012, 07:20 AM   #30
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Default Re: Shop heater

Good point Craig, we actually got our premiums lowered by putting in the outside boiler.
Now, no furnace/flame in the house or outbuildings.
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Old 03-23-2012, 07:59 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig Lewis View Post

A woodstove does provide the best feeling heat in my opinion...and not as dangerous as some might think given some common sense.
(even though common sense maybe ain't so common)
The reality is they are no more dangerous than any garage heater that uses a flame for heat inside, which fed by inside air for combustion. The key is to keep any unit up off of the floor, the higher the better, to keep the burner away from vapors, which being heavier than air tend to stay down near the floor.

Outside wood furnaces also work very well and a number of our neighbors use them, as about 50% of the people here in Northern New England heat with wood.

We are fortunate to be able to by firewood for $175- $200 a cord delivered.
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Old 03-23-2012, 08:03 AM   #32
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Default Re: Shop heater

i have a wastse oil furnace, it works great, but there is usually oil everywhere,
try haveing cieling fans running, it solved out problem
John
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Old 03-23-2012, 09:13 AM   #33
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Default Re: Shop heater

I put in a New Air G73 electric heater in my 2 car garage this winter and love it. Its cheap, small, quiet yet does the job. Its 5000W and I think its 18,000 BTU. Just right for that amount of space.
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Old 03-23-2012, 10:34 AM   #34
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I started my interest in the craft as a finisher. 99% of the better shops I've worked in and visited always had hanging forced air unit heaters. When dealing with anything that can emit fumes, the higher the better for the furnace. Fumes gather on the floor, and ventilation/moving air is prime safety factor. I'm heating 1200sqft with open trusses using an older HD Janitrol 175,000BTU unit heater. Running it all day, keeping the shop at 65 for most of Jan and Feb, my highest gas bill (house included) was $230.00. I'm out there 9-12hrs a day, and I turn it off at night.
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Old 03-23-2012, 12:12 PM   #35
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Default Re: Shop heater

I have a relatively small 12' X 24' garage. When I built it I ran 220 along with the 110 so as to install 6 ft. long baseboard heaters in the center of the long walls and put a thermostat control on the wall. Of course the walls and ceiling are well insulated.

They do a great job and quickly heat up the area to the selected temp.

No fan to blow stuff around, no open flame or glowing elements (fire risk), custom temp. settings, absolutely quiet, a low location to give even heat throughout - even when I'm on my back under the car -, practically flush with the wall taking up minimal space, cheap purchase and installation and reasonable energy useage.
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Old 03-23-2012, 12:24 PM   #36
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Default Re: Shop heater

a nipco works Great too!
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